100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 18, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-07-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday July 18, 1068

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Miree

Thu rsday July18, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Military coup overthrows
.Aref government in Iraq

President Bakr Ex-president Aref
The Gilbert & Sullivan Society
With Ann Arbor Junior Light Opera,
Present
*
Jhe Smash Hit Musikal
look, Music and Lyrics by LIONEL BARy
"ip*dw.gkoa -'wr *wi
Wednesday thru Saturday
July 17-20 8 P.M.,
Special Saturday Matinee - 2 p.m. - Children $1.00
Trueblood Theatre
All Seats Reserved! Price $2.00 ea.
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY-- 12:30 P.M.

BEIRUT, Lebanon (A') - Iraq's
third military coup in the last
decade has supplanted President
Abdel Rahman Aref's leftist gov-
ernment with a Revolutionary
Command Council headed by Maj.
Gen. Ahmed Hassa~t Bakr, Radio
Baghdad announced yesterday.
Ordered into exile, Aref flew to
Istanbul on his way to London in
an Iraqi airlines plane.
Iraqi fighter squadrons cris-
crossed over Baghdad during the
night. The radio assured the
city's people the fighters sup-
ported the coup, however.
Iraq's borders, ports, airfields
and railroad services were shut
down and a 12-hour curfew-6
a.m. to 6 p.m.-was proclaimed
across the country.
While Radio Baghdad described
the governmental switch as blood-
less, the Tehran newspaper Ette-
4laat said there were clashes in
Baghdad, Basra and other cities,
including Khorramshahr ap d
Khosrovi near the Iraqi border
with Iran.
Quoting its field correspondents
and travelers, Ettelaat said heavy
explosions sounded on the Iraqi
side of the Shatt al Arab, a border
river, and at least two battalions
of Iraqi troops were resisting the
coup in the northeastern region
of Iraq.
Bakr, who was elected presi-
dent, was premier in 1963, when
the Baath Socialist party ruled
Iraq. Though a moderate, he was
dismissed when Aref's brother, the
late President Abdel Salam Aref,
purged all Baathists from the
government.
The new president belongs to a
Baathist wing bitterly opposed to
the radical leftist faction of the
party now ruling neighboring
Syria and seeking to spread its
influence throughout the Middle
East.
His relations with Egypt while
he was premier were uneasy. That
could mean a switch later since
ties between Cairo and Baghdad
during the Aref regime were close.

-Associated Press

Rocky meets South Chicago

Tito, Ceausescu
to visit Czechs,
display support
PRAGUE (R) - President Tito of Yugoslavia and Roman-
ian Communist leader Nicolae Ceausescu were reported pre-
paring last night to come to Prague in a dramatic show of
support for Czechoslovakia's liberal leaders in their fight
against Moscow and the orthodox Communists of Eastern
Europe.
Word of the expected visits coincided with release of a
letter by the Soviet-line countries warning the Prague lead-
ership that current developments in Czechoslovakia endan-
ger the basis of the Commun-
ist system. I

Rocky cites Harriman
approval of peace plan

CARY GRANT

FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Gull,
The highpoint of American
situation comedies!
Story
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
7:00 and 9:05
75c

CHICAGO CA() - Gov. Nelson
A. Rockefeller reported yesterday
that his Vietnam peace plan had
drawn a "very enthusiastic" re-
action from the American dele-
gation at the Paris peace talks.
The New York governor told
reporters a "friend" in the dele-
gation-it quickly became known
he referred to chief negotiator W.
Averell Harriman-had contacted
him and told him the plan was
"very helpful."
Rockefeller spoke of this with
obvious pleasure while answering
questions at a news conference
during a campaign visit to Chi-
cago in his quest for the Republi-
can presidential nomination.
Shortly afterwards, he took his
campaign onto the streets of Chi-
cago's South Side neighborhoods,
heavily populated with Negroes,
and wqs warmly received during
a short walking tour.
On his walk in the South Side
neighborhood, Rockefeller stopped
at the headquarters of the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference. He talked for about
20 minutes with the Rev. Jesse

World news roundup

Jackson, head of Operation
Breadbasket, the economic arm of
the SCLC.
Rockefeller went into the South
Side before flying on to Mil-
waukee for a private meeting
with the state's 30-member dele-
gation to the GOP national con-
vention. The -delegation is pledged
to Richard M. Nixon on the first
ballot because of Nixon's victory
in the Wisconsin primary.
At the Chicago news confer-

ence, Rockefeller also maintained
he had been gaining delegate sup-
port during the last 10 days,
while Nixon had been suffering
a "slow leakage."
Rockefeller maintained t h a t
Nixon would fall far short of
the 677 votes needed to win the
nomination, not only on the first
ballot but on the second ballot
also. He claimed he will win it
himself on the fourth or fifth
ballot.

The letter, drafted by Commun-
ist party leaders from the Soviet
Union, East Germany, Poland,
Hungary and Bulgaria at a just-
concluded conference in Warsaw,
was distributed yesterday by the
Hungarian news agency MTI.
Reliable sources in Belgrade dis-
closed Tito's plans and also said
Ceausescu would come to Prague.
Tito, first of the rebels against
Kremlin control, has been chart-
ing an independent course since
his break with Stalin in 1948.
Ceausescu also has been increas-
ingly defiant.
As Europe's Communists chose
sides in the Czechoslovak crisis,
there were these other develop-
ments:
--In Moscow, the Central Com-
mittee of the Soviet Communist
party held a special meeting on
Czechoslovakia, the official So-
viet news agency Tass reported.
Summoning of the Central Com-
mittee underlined the seriousness
the Kremlin attaches to the sit-
uation. The Soviet press has com-
pared developments to the Hun-
garian crisis of 1956 when Soviet
troops intervened to put down a
revolution against the Budapest
Communist regime.
-In Prague, a Czechoslovak
army statement said Soviet troops
who lingered after the end of
Warsaw Pact maneuvers last
month were moving out "accord-
ing to schedule." The army said
"all Soviet troops" - part of an
original unit of 18,500 men -
would leave the country but gave
no date.
The Warsaw letter of the So-
viet-liners, addressed to the Cen-
tral Committee of the Czechoslo-
vak Communist party, said: "We
will never admit that imperialism
-- whether by peaceful or un-
peaceful means, whether from in-
side or outside - can.create a rift
within the Socialist - Communist
system and change in their fa-
vor the power balance in Europe.""
The letter urged Czechoslovak
reformist leadership to re-estab-
lish firm party control over lib-
erals and the press.
In plain language, this means
the letter demanded the restora-
tion of press censorship and a re-
versal of the liberalization drive
that has been sweeping the coun-
try since January.
A public opinion poll published
in Prague yesterday showed the
population overwhelmingly behind
party chief Alexander Dubcek and
91 per cent of those queried ask-
ing that Russian troops withdraw
as soon as possible.

MIAMI, Fla.-A DC8 jetliner
forced to Cuba by a daring young
hijacker with a grenade and a gun
returned to Miami yesterday af-
ternoon but its 57 passengers were
left behind in Havana. It was the
second airliner this month forced
to return to the United States
with only its crew.
The four-engine National Air-
lines jet touched down at Miami
International Airport at 5:11 p.m.
GEORGE WEIN PRESENTS
one great niaht

EDT, completing a flight it began
earlier yesterday in Los Angeles.
The return was a replay of a
hijacking July 1 when a North-
west Orient Airlines DC8 jet was
forced to Cuba and made to re-
turn without its 86 passengers,
who were brought back several
hours later in an aircraft charter-
ed by the U.S. Government.
* * *
LONDON - James Earl Ray's
Alabama lawyer protested vigor-
ously yesterday against plans to
fly the accused assassin of the
Rev. Dr. aMrtin Luther King Jr.
to Memphis, Tenn., without his
own legal counsel aboard the
plane.
Addressing newsmen after visit-
ing Ray in a Wandsworth Prison
for 45 minutes, Arthur J. Hanes,
former mayor of Birmingham,
said Ray had asked him to fly
back with him but that U.S. au-
thorities had turned down the re-
quest.
Ray decided Tuesday not to ap-
peal against extradition any
longer.

.enemy
readies
new attack
SAIGON (A) - The enemy Is
gathering forces for an all-out of-
fensive against Saigon and else-
where sometime between July and
September to try to influence the
Paris peace talks, Defense Secre-
tary Clark M. Clifford declared
yesterday.
President Nguyen Van Thieu
agreed, saying the Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese are gathering
all their resources and "reserving
their most elite troops for the
coming attacks against Saigon
and other cities."
Both the visiting U.S. defense
secretary and Thieu predicted
victory in the coming battles. Clif-
ford said he based his predictions
on briefings he received from
military commanders in Saigon
and in the north.
The present absence of signi-
ficant fighting anywhere in South
Vietnam is only "the lull before
the storm," he added.
"We proceed on the assumption
that enemy combat plans at this
time are coupled with their desire
to make an impression on the con-
ferees in Paris, that if they might
be able to bring off some spec-
tacular accomplishment this could
affect the negotiations," Clifford
said.
* * *
Hanoi to free
3 u.S. airmen
In Paris, North Vietnam dis-
closed at the peace talks yester.
day the names of three U.S. air.
men it has promised to release
and American officials hope they
may start the flight home to-
morrow.
The meeting lasted nearly 41/%
hours, the longest of the 13 ses-
sions held thus far, but U.S. Am-
bassador W. Averell Harriman
said afterward: "Nothing was
achieved in that time. There was
no progress whatsoever."
* **
LBJ prepares
to meet Theu
President Johnson conferred
with his No. 2 peace negotiator
and other top aides yesterday as
he prepared for his weekend sum-
mit meeting in Honolulu with
South Vietnam's president, Nguy-
en Van Thieu.
Cyrus R. Vance, deputy to Har-
riman at the talks in Paris, brief-
ed Johnson after breakfast after
flying in from the French capital.
Vance intends to return there to-
morrow.
The Honolulu sessions are
scheduled for Friday and Satur-
day.
Clifford, now on an inspection
tour of South Vietnam, and Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk, who
plans to leave Washington today
are in the high-ranking contin-
gent joining Johnson in Honolulu.
Thieu is expected to seek John-
son's assurance for a continued
U.S. commitment to South Viet-
nam, more U.S. aid and a major
role in peace negotiations at such
time as they get into serious bar-
gaining.
It was anticipated that John-
son would press Thieu for ener-
getic South Vietnamese efforts.

KATHERINE HEPBURN

JAMES STEWART

SHOW TIMES
Mon. thru Sat. 7 and 9
Sunday 3-5-7-10:45
"Sneak" at 9:00 Sun.

mmw
v -a &am

-w

.4

CAROL WhIE ArMNS
STADOM INT'OOR. COW'
A FEMININE ALFIE!'
Carol White emerges as
a rival of Julie Christie
& Faye Dunaway,;
A STAR IS BORN!"
--Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
5 BEST! The sizzling
diary of a girl whose r
life swings like a
pendulum between
two men!"
-Robert Saimagg4,
WINS Radio v
If you are squeamish, may we
recommend that you do not.
"Poor Cow during which an actual birth scene is
vividly and graphically portrayed on the screen.
-The Management
National General Pctures presents
A Joseph Janni Production
Terence Stamp -
as Dave « '
CarolWhtein F
' POOR OOW

VELVEETA STATE OPERA COMPANY
Presents:
WEDNESDAY - SATURDAY
CANTERBURY HOUSE, Maynard Street
9-12 P.M.
Dance, Films, Roller Skating, Fans,
Electric Music, Audience Participation
ADMISSION: 50c per nite
ULTRA-VIOLET HANDSTAMPS

UNDERGROUND at

A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PROGRAM OF UNUSUAL, PSYCHEDELIC, ANIMATED, DOCUMENTARY,
OLD-TIME COMEDY, AND OTHER UNUSUAL FILMS IS PRESENTED EACH WEEKEND.
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING-11.00 P.M. & 1:00 A.M.-SATURDAY MATINEES 3:00 & 5:00
U NDERGROUND FILM PROGRAM - Friday and Saturday, July 19-20

SUNDAY NIGHT
FILM SERIES
Sunday, July 21
.9:00 P.M. only
NEWMAN CENTER
Thompson and William St
(Not Architecture Aud.)
KANA
Andrej Wojda 1956
(the director of ASHES
AND D fIAMONDr~S

COMING DOWN-! ! WORLD PREMIERE1!!
FIRST SHOWING ANYWHERE of this film by Pat O'neill. A cre-
ative filming of the U.S. of A. singing and playing that song from
their new Columbia album, filmed in the style of 7362.
BLOTTO-Laurel and Hardy
One of their classic comedies, featuring an hilarious drunk scene.

MAINSTREAM-Jerry Abrams
A moment of sexual desire, stretched in time, which pauses mid-
way in its lyrical journey to poke fun at itself.
MOTORCYCLE-James Beatman
A New American cinemapoem on cycles and sex.
.rrr .nr s*wti ~r ~ tn I wtt lAE :

i

i

I

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan