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July 16, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-07-16

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t

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, July 16. 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FIRED HIS SHARE:
Baseball man Lane explains dismissals of managers

.
. ....

MIAMI, Fla. (R)-It's inflexibili-
ty-not inability-that costs ma-
jor league baseball managers their
jobs, says Fran Lane, a man who
once took part in the simultane-
ous firing of two field bosses.
Lane said the manager's role is
overrated anyway.
"A manager gets too much
credit when he wins and too much
hell when he loses," Lane said.
"Anyway you look at it, a lot
of money'is involved and attend-
ance falls off when a team's not
winning," Lane said. "A major
league manager knows he's hired
to be fired some day."
"The No. 1 reason why man-
agers are fired is their failure to
adjust to a changing situation or
to adjust their style of play to the
material they have," Lane said
in an interview published in yes-
terday's Miami News.
Lane was in Miami on business
in his current role as special as-
sistant to personnel director Har-
ry Dalton of the Baltimore Ori-

oles, a club whch recently dropped
Hank Bauer.
Gene Mauch of Philadelphia,
Houston's Gray Hatton and Ed-
die Stanky of the Chicago White
Sox are other managers recently
unemployed.
"Stanky lost sight of the kind
of team he can win with-pitching,
defense and speed," Lane said.
"With Stanky's kind of team he
led the American League most of
last season and lost out in the last
series of the season. During the
off-season he traded away speed
dail1
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

for older, slower fellows with po-
tentially stronger bats. He broke
up the kind of team he could win
with."
As for Bauer, Lane said the fir-
ing was another example of fail-
ure to adjust.
"When a manager begins losing
with a formerly good hitting team
that has a batting slump, he can't
just sit back, continue to employ
the same tactics of attack and ex-
cuse himself by using that cliche,
'you can't hit for 'em.' He should
adjust to the situation. He should
bunt, hit-and-run and try for one
run more."
As general manager of the
White Sox, Cleveland, St. Louis
Cardinals and Kansas City, Lane
hired and fired his share of man-,
agers.
He was involved in the only in-
stance of two managers being
hired and fired simultaneously-
when as Cleveland general man-
ager in 1959 he swapped Joe Gor-
don to Detroit for Jimmy Dykes.
Lane says certain managers are

ready-made for certain teams and
cited Gordon at Kansas City.
"Gordon did a bad job for me
in 1959 at Cleveland," Lane said.
"We should have won the pen-
nant. Then I inherited him at
Kansas City in 1961 and we fin-
ished a bad last, but he did a fine
job as manager."
"We had, fringe major league
ballplayers and he got the maxi-
mum out of them by keeping them
loose and not fearful they might
be shipped out to the minors the
next day. Bauer would do a good
job with a young expansion club
from which nothing Js expected
and I think he'll wind up with
one."
He referred to Leo Durocher as
a manager he said is successful
with good teams that are expected
to win.
"They say Durocher is a good
manager of a good team but a
bad manager of a bad team,"
Lane said. "But who can manage
a bad team?"

215 S. State
-2 1 5 S .,S at e-NA M E T H E B U IL D IN G,
Submit a name during the,fair
The winner wi I I receive a $50
gift certificate to be used
anywhere in the building.
THE
PRIME MOVER

4

HANK BAUER

S

Lions open camp following settlement

4'

BLOOMFIELD, HILLS, Mich.,
)P -hWith most veterans in
camp, the Detroit Lions opened
preseason workouts yesterday at
Cranbrook School north of De-
troit.
Coach Joe Schmidt put the
squad through a light, one hour
workout in 93-degree heat.
Schmidt said "it won't be long
before the other veterans will be
in camp. They got caught on
short notice because of this pen-"
sion thing."
National Football League own-
ers and the players association,
headed by Lions' guard John
Gordy, agreed to a $3 million in-
crease in pension benefits over
the next two years in a New
York meeting Sunday.
Gordy was one of some 15
veterans who failed to arrive in
time for Monday's workout.
"John called Joe and told him
he would be late in arriving be-
cause he had to sign papers and
wind up details of the negotia-
tions in New York," a club
spokesman said. "He should be
in camp Tuesday."
The spokesman said four of
the 15 absentees arrived during
the workout and most of the rest
were expected in camp by night-
fall.
Veteran fullback Amos Marsh
and offensive tackle Roger
Shoals are expected tomorrow be-
cause of long motor trips from
the West Coast.
The team is to hold its annual

-Associated Press
ST. LOUIS CARDINAL rookies begin workouts under the watchful eye of coach Charlie Winner
following the settlement of a new pension agreement between owners and the NFL players' as-
sociation. The player to the far left in the picture is Rocky Rosema, a standout linebacker and
defensive end for three years at Michigan.

press day today before getting open the exhibition season Aug..
down to serious work tomorrow. 5 against the American Football
The Lions, who wound up with League Bills in Buffalo. The
a 4-7-2 nark in Schmidt's first regular season begins Sept. 15
year as head coach last season, against the Cowboys at Dallas.

Major League
Standings

: '":+i:" ## til~sEie i~ii:"r}}::ti.,".;{WE~ : ; 'r;> ":v:.}'r:.oif i
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
4. The Graduate School Board of
Inquiry wili schedule a hearing of the
charges. The Dean will provide staff
support. The student may have an
adviser present such as a member of
the faculty, friend, rative, or an at-
torney. The hearing will be confiden-
tial, but it may be declared open by
the Council on the written request of
the student.
5. The Graduate School Board of In-
quiry will report its findings' and rec-
ommendations to the Executive Board
of the Graduate School, with copies to
the student and his department.
6. Both the student and his depart-
ment will be given a period of not
more than 30 days to comment on the
findings and recommendations of the
Board of Inquiry.
7. The Executive Board will then act
on the matter.
Violations of rules established by in-
dividual departments or programs will
be handled procedurally by the same
unit, which shall recommend appro-
priate action to the Graduate School.
Each department or program is ex-
pected to provide the student with a
formal statement of charges, the op-
portunity for a hearing at which the
student may have an adviser present
and may present evidence in his own
behalf and the right of appeal to the
Executive Board of the Graduate
School.
The Graduate School reserves the
right to delegate authority for enforce-
ment of any of its rules of conduct
to appropriate other bodies established
within its framework. The standards
of conduct and the procedures for en-
forcing them set by the Graduate
ISchool are subject to review by the
'oard of Regents and may not be in
conflict with any general university
rules nad procedures set by the Board
of Regents.
Placement
BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS
3200 SAB
GENERAL DIVISION
Announcement:
Peace Corps Week, July 22-26, Ar-
rangements and information to be an-
nounced.
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and
phone, please call 754-7460 for further
information.
Anderson Fine Arts Center. Ander-
son, Indiana - Executive Director, man
with some museum .work, pref. MA,
ability to work with cultural grpups
in community and teach Art Apprecia-
tion courses. Center emphasizes ex-
hibits and educational programs.
State of Wisconsin - Systems Ana-
lyst, degree and 18 mo. exper. in in-
formation activities, MBA and no exper.
acceptable, for Winnebago State Hos-
pital. Director of Community Services
for Dept. of Local Affairs and Div., de-
gree and min. 3 years in local gov., or
rel. areas, public administration duties.
Gardner-Denver Company, Grand Ha-
ven, Mich. - Design and Dev. Engrs.
(2). in area of new product dev. in in-
dust. or pheumatic tool indust. BSME
aid 0-5 yrs. in design. One position
prefers MS or MBA in addition to
BSME and 3 years in des. & dev.
State of Washington -- Education
Program Specialist, MA in ed. plus 3
years teaching, or one yr. grad, study
and 2 years supv. exper. in ed. fld.
Other positions in Educ. Specialties
with more years exper. also,

Custom Leatherwork
Astrology Charts

Hair Styling
Bell Bottoms

playing live through the Fair
PARAPHERNALIA
Now opening in Ann Arbor
New York's most exciting Fashion Boutique.
will present
AN EXCITING FASHION SHOW
Everything to be found.

4:

Antique Jewelry

BACK TO BROOKLYN:
Yanks give Colavito new home

BALTIMORE W--Rocky Cola-
Vito, a Bronx boy who found fame
in Cleveland and Detroit, finally
became a New York Yankee yes-
terday in his 18th year of profes-
sional baseball.
The Yankees signed Colavito as
a free agent after he had been cut
loose by the Los Angeles Dodgers
who bought him from the Chica-
go White Sox last March.
In all, Rocky played with four

different American League teams
and in the National before his
latest step.
To get a Yankee contract, the
34-year-old slugger volunteered
to help out the Yankees' bullpen
as a part time relief pitcher as
well as an outfielder and pinch-
hitter.;
He was hitting only .204 when
the Dodgers cut him loose last
week. However, he has hit 369

Iilaria overall winner in '68
'Pt. Huron-Mackinac sail race

home runs in the majors, three of
them this season.
The Rock, a handsome dark-
haired athlete who is known for
exaggerated muscle - stretching
antics before he steps into the
batter's box, now lives in Temple,
Pa. His family still lives in New
York.
Among the high spots of his
career was the feat of hitting four
homers in one game for Cleveland,
June 10, 1959. He also hit four for
Detroit in a 1961 doubleheader. In
1959 he tied Harmon Killebrew
for the American League homer
title with 42 and in 1965 he fed
the league with 108 RBI for
Cleveland.
The Yanks also made another
player change, sending pitcher Al
Downing to their Binghamton
N.Y. farm club of the Eastern
League on option.
They indicated he would be
back in a week or two after get-
ting a chance to do some pitching
in the minors.
Downing, 14-10, last year but
D-1 this season, has been handi-
capped by arm trouble, now ap-
parently cured

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.
xDetroit 56 31 .644
Baltimore 48 37 .565
Cleveland 50 41 .549
Boston 45 40 .529
Oakland 42 45 .483
Minnesota 41 45 .477
xCalifornia 41 45 .477
New York 39 45 .464
Chicago 37 47 .440
Washington 30 53 .361
x-Late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 3, Washington 2
Cleveland 4, Minnesota 2
Oakland 12, Boston 5
Baltimore 8, New York 2
Detroit at California, inc.
Today's Games
Detroit at Oakland, night
Cleveland at California, night
Boston at Minnesota, night
Baltimore at Chicago, night
Washington at New York, 2,
twi-night
NATIONAL LEAGUE

GB
7
10
14
14th
141,..
15
171.
24

Hair Pieces
Frosting
Shading
Curls, Curls

Boots

Capes
Sandals
Custom Clothing

Incense
Posters
Pipes
Candles

Clothing and fabrics from around the world.

Books on:

Yoga Magic Astrology

Zen Tarot

Carvings
Hookahs,
B rasswork
Bottles

MACKINAC ISLAND, Mich. OP)
-The Class A yawl Hilaria, ownedj
and sailed by Hugh Schaddelle of
the Detroit Yacht Club, was de-
clared the over-all winner yester-
day, of the 44th annual Port
Huron-to-Mackinac Yacht Race.
The big white yawl won with a
corrected time of 29 hours, 40
minutes, 29 seconds. Hilaria's
elapsed time for the 205-nautical
mile course was 32:38:53.
Winners, both over-all and in
classes, are determined by cor-
rected times, which are computed
using a complex handicapping
formula.
The over-all finish also gave
Hilaria top honors in Class A,
made up of the largest boats in
the race. The NY32 sloop Sap-
phire, owned by Harry Neesley of
the Detroit Yacht Club, was sec-
ond in Class A with a corrected
time of 29:59:39. The ,12-meter
sloop Norsaga took third in the
class with a time of 30:03:14.
Norsaga, the first boat across
the finish line Sunday night had
ATTENTION
FRESHMEN
,Reserve your

the lowest elapsed time of any
boat in the race, 30:04:00.
Norsaga became the race's un-
official scratch boat when the
newer 12-meter sloop American
Eagle was prevented from reach-
ing the Port Huron starting line
because of the St. Lawrence Sea-
way strike.

St. Louis
Atlanta
Philadelphia
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
New York
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
H~ou ston

W
58
48
45
45
42
43
41
40
41
318

L
31
40
40
45
24
47
48
47
49
52

Pet.
.652
.545
.524
.546
.488
.478
.461
.459
.456
.427

GB
11
13
14i/
15
17
17'
720

The annual
sponsored by
Yacht Club.

sailing classic was
Detroit's Bayview

Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 5, New York 3
Chicago 2, Pittsburgh 1
Atlanta 4, San Francisco 2
St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 2
Houston at Cincinnati, rain

Middle eastern, Indian & African Art pieces
Complete selection of Imported Tarot Cards-
Clothing, shawls, hats from the twenties.
Six unique shops in one building
Paraphernalia
Middle Earth'
Little Things
x ~Salon Renissance
I n I

0

Michigan Faculty Members-
Have you made use of your football Ticket
Benefits? If not; here's a reminder that Your a
preference for location at Michigan's six Home
Football games expires Aug. 1.
If you are faculty, an administrative officer and retired
from faculty' staff,' but still retain faculty privileges, you
can:
ts _ __ _._ ._ __ J!_ 1 . _. " i _ ... 1 _ t . _ ._ _. _.r .. _. ...! _.;:: C4".{1 .. ::,-::: ;:

*4

A..

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