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July 13, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-07-13

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THE MICHIGAN bA L.Y

Page Three

THE_ MIHGN.AL.ag he

Kosygin:
Czechs not
worred
HARPSUND, Sweden ()-So-
viet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin
said last night the Czechoslovak
people "were never worried" about
Russian troops and that the West-
ern press had sensationalized re-
ports about the Red army's pro-
longed stay in their country.
"The Czechs were never wor-
ried about it," Kosygin said in
answer to a question when re-
porters caught him outside the
summer residence of Swedish Pre-
mier Tage Erlander. "It's only the
Western press."
Kosygin referred to the cori-
tinued presence of Soviet troops
in Czechoslovakia after Warsaw
Pact war games ended June 30.
The liberal regime into Prague
announced Thursday that Rus-
sians would begin pulling out to-
day.
But concern about the troops
and new Soviet attacks on the
Czechoslovak reform movement
had, in fact, been voiced in Pra-
gue newspaper.
The trade union daily Prace
charged yesterday that criticism
of the democratization process in
Moscow's Pravda "openly sup-
ported" the regime of former
President Antonin Novotny, a
Stalinist hard-liner.
"It is difficult to evaluate the
article otherwise-in connection
with the current attitude of the
Soviet press to Czechoslovakia-
than as a criticism of the present,
apd at the same time open sup-
port of the former leadership of
the Czechoslovak Communist par-
ty and the system which it created
in the party and in the country,"
Prace said..
"The Soviet press in half a year
has not been able to reprint at
least the essentials of the Czecho-
slovak party's action program,"
correspondent Lubomir Subrt
wrote from Moscow.
Here on a state visit, Kosygin
spent most of the day touring the
Swedish provinces.
He told a Swedish manufacturer
that Soviet peas are greener and
Soviet tractors are stronger than
those in Sweden.

Dirksen

defends

LBJ

appointees

-Associated Press
Small distraction
A young admirer tries to climb into John Lindsay's lap as the
New York mayor, campaigning in Milwaukee on behalf of Nelson
Rockefeller, speaks to a group from,the back seat of a convertible.

-Associated Press
Appointee Thornberry talks with Dirksen
SUICIDE SQUAD:
Exipeect Saigon attack.

WASHINGTON (P) - Senate Republican Leader Everett M.
Dirksen of Illinois defended yesterday President Johnson's
right to appoint two old friends to the Supreme Court - and
said Presidents traditionally have named cronies to top jobs.
"You don't go out and look for an enemy to put on the
court," Dirksen said at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing
on the nominations of Justice Abe Fortas to be chief justice
and Judge Homer Thornberry to become an associate justice.
Sen. Robert P. Griffin (R-Mich.), who opposes the
nominations, indicated befpre the committee that he might
lead, a filibuster to delay or '
block the appointments.
"I'm suggesting that the Senate
take a great deal of time" in ex- Waliace
amining/ the two appointments,
Griffin said.
He alided he would try to block
"any effort to push this to a vote N .
within the next few weeks."
Dirksen also defended Johnson's
right to continue making appoint-
ments despite the President's an-
nounced intention to leave, office
in January. He drew a parallel BOSTON (A')-A state-by-state
with nine Senators who are not survey shows George C. Wallace
seeking re-election. "Are they to "has moved quite far towards
abstain from voting?" he asked. helping - and perhaps electing-
The minority leader also de- the Democratic presidential can-
fended Johnson against those who didate," the Christian Science
call him ra "lame duck." ie said Monitor said yesterday.
"I find that term 'lame duck' as The survey, taken by Monitor
applied to the President of the writers, also indicated that Wal-
United States as entirely improper lace's third-party candidacy "has
and an ioffensive term." moved quite far toward throwing
Dirksen spoke after Griffin de- the contest into the House of
livered a lengthy attack on John- Representatives."
son's nominations. ' The, newspaper said Wallace's
"Never before has there been candidacy will hurt the Repub-
such obvious political maneuver- lican nominee' more than the
ing to create a vacancy so that a Democratic candidate in 35 states
'lame duck' President can fill it with 429 electoral votes, but it
and thereby -deny the opportunity is difficult to tell in which states
to a' new President about to be the Wallace impact might be the
elected 'by the people," Griffin difference between a Republican
said. victory and defeat.
He added that "the argument A survey taken last September
has been advanced that if a crony indicated that Wallace would
-nominated because he is a crony damage the chances of victory of
--is qualified, he should be ap- GOP candidates in 14 states with
proved. I reject such a view be- 173 electoral votes.
cause it demeans the Senate and In this po.the paper said it
the Supreme Court." was assumed Vice President Hub.-
Dirksen said a crony is nothing ert *H. Humphrey would be the
.more than an intimate companion Democratic candidate and either
or a friend and added, "President former Vice President Richard
Truman had some rather intimate M. Nixon or Gov. Nelson A.
friends and he sent them to the Rockefeller of New York would
Supreme Court." be the Republican candidate.
NXational news roundup

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
and DEPARTMENT OF ART
Present Mozart's Comic Opera
"THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO"
(Performances in English)
TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY
THURSDAY, Aug. 1 and Sat., Aug. 5
8:00 p.m. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

SAIGON (RP)-Extra guards were
posted in Saigon yesterday after
officials reported Viet Cong sui-
cide squads may strike inside the
capital this weekend. Some
thought this might be a prelude to
an offensive by strong enemy
forces waiting outside the city.
Shortly after security was tight-
ened, a U.S. soldier was shot to
death in populous district in down-
town Saigon. Police said he was
slain by two men and they found
two enemy shells believed to be
from AK47 assault rifles, the
standard weapon of the enemy.
Extra guards were placed
around the U.S. Embassy, the
presidential palace where Presi-
dent Nguyen Van Thieu has his
offices, and other major instal-
lations and buildings.
A U.S. mission spokesman said
the beefed up security guard were
i

"to provide extra safety in case
the attack does come off this
weekend."
Police and paramilitary police
units were placed on 100 per cent
alert. More were sent to guard
bridges leading into the city and
to checkpoints on the outskirts.
U.S. authorities believe a new
attack on Saigon will be designed
to show the government cannot
defend its own capital and to
bolster North Vietnam's position
at the Paris peace talks with the
United States.
About 1,000 Viet Cong have in-
filtrated Saigon recently, highly
placed Vietnamese sources said.
The sources said government
authorities "do not feel the in-
filtrators will do anything until
they get outside support."
This was taken to mean the
Viet -Cong who have come in were
terrorists, demolition experts,
commandos and guides who would
not go into action until assaults
were launched from areas sur-
rounding Saigon.
Intelligence reports have in-
dicated enemy movement was
going on outside Saigon and that
ground assaults will be linked with
rocket and mortar attacks. These
reports have said enemy forces
would make a more determined

effort in a new attack to create
chaos with suicide-type squads in
the center of Saigon.
Earlier attacks in the lunar new.
year at the end of January and,
early in May concentrated in out-
lying city areas and in Cholon,
the largely Chinese quarter, al-
though in February suicide squads
assaulted the U.S. Embassy,
Enemy forces within easy strik-
ing distance of Saigon are be-
lieved to total about 11,000 men,
Vietnamese intelligence sources
say, with perhaps 10,000 more
spread farther out around the
capital.
The exact number of allied
troops assigned to the defense
of Saigon is secret, but there are
more than two divisions of U.S.
and South Vietnamese troops on
the city perimeter and another
six divisions in positions farther
out.
Another citywide defense drill
was scheduled for noon today, fol-
lowing the first two weeks ago. In
these alerts, sirens are sounded,
all traffic is halted and people are
required to take shelter.
Security measures in the al-
ready tense capital will be height-
ened over the weekend for the
visit of Defense Secretary Clark
M. Clifford. '

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ALL SEATS $3.00-BOX OFFICE OPENS JULY 9

Daily Classifieds Get Results.

Russ Gibbs Production

Presents

THIS WEEK ONLY
University
Players'

of

At the

5th Dimension

216 W. Huron, Ann Arbor
Direct from England

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The United
States is donating 5,000 tons of
food worth $1.3 million for Niger-
ian civil war victims ,the State
Department said yesterday.
However, a spokesman ac-
knowledged there are no assur-
ances the food will be allowed' to
reach the starving thousands in
Biafra, the breakaway eastern
province of Nigeria.
WASHINGTON -;John Ed-
ward Ingersoll, Justice Depart-
ment official and a former Char-
lotte, N.C., police chief was
named yesterday to 'head the
Justice Department's new Bureau
of Narcotics and Dangerous
Drugs.
Ingersoll would be the first
director of the bureau established
April 8 by the merger of the
Treasury Department's Bureau of
Narcotics and the Welfare De-
partment's Bureau of Drug Abuse
Control.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The House
voted yesterday to create a spe-
cial joint congressional commit-
tee to investigate crime.

l
-;
ti
r," ;
.
w
1
'_
1

THE PINK FLOYD

It sent to the Senate by roll-
call vote of 318 to 12 a resolution
to set u a committee of seven
representatives and seven sena-
tors, with instructions to cope
up with some recommendations
by next January, when it would
cease to exist.
* * *
WASHINGTON - Sen. Stephen
M. Young predicted yesterday
North Korea will release the USS
Pueblo and its' crewm~n next
month in return for a U.S. apol-
ogy and large indemnity pay-
ment. The State Department dis-
puted the forecast.
Young ,an Ohio Democrat and
a member of the Armed Services
Committee, said in a statement,
"The ship and crew will be re-
leased. The incident will be
closed."
'* * *
NEW YORK - U.S. customs
officials said yesterday they found
$4 million in pure heroin taped
to the bodies of a pretty school-
teacher and her hairdresser c6m-
panion when they landed at Ken-
nedy Airport on a flight from
Brazil.
Authorities said the two Ar-
gentine women were "undoubted-
ly couriers" for perhaps the larg-
est heroin smuggling ring in the
world.
NEW YORK -A manhunt
through the congested slums and
the busy streets of New York
failed yesterday to uncover any
trace of a Bronx sniper who shot
three men to death, then melted
away as police lay siege to his
tenement building. He was be-
lieved armed, and capable of kill-
ing again.

RATIONALS

THYME

I

Saturday and Sunday,
JULY 13th and 14th
7-11 P.M.

NO AGE LIMIT
Admission $2.50

TONIGHT-7:O0 & 9:05--INEMA GUILD
THE SILENT WORLD
COLOR, 1956. Jacques Cousteau's award-winning
documentary on life under the sea". . . rich! . .'-
Short: "Night Owls" with Laurel & Hardy.
Architecture Auditorium-75c cheap

I

TONIGHT--7.34 P.M.
Rm. 3-RS Michigan Union
A Program of
MOVEMENT
FILMS
50 min., includes
Chicago demonstration
Draft resistance organizing
New York City's U.W.M.
DONATION REQUESTED
SPONSORED BY VOICE-SDS

" Y
s ~ .
Air-Conditioned

m

UNDERGROUND at

I I

A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PROGRAM OF EXPERIMENTAL, PSYCHEDELIC, ANIMATED, DOCUMEN-
TARY, OLD-TIME COMEDY, AND OTHER OUT-OF-THE-ORDINARY FILMS IS PRESENTED EACH WEEK
END-
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING-11:00 P.M. & 1:00 A.M.-SATURDAY MATINEES 3:00 & 5:00
NOTICE: the difficulty experienced with the sound last week has been fixed
PROGRAM FOR FRI. and SAT., JULY 12 and 13
UNDERGROUND PROGRAM-JULY 12 & 13

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4

A SYMPOSIUM

on

EASTERN EUROPE AND
EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

"Communist Theories of United Europe"
GERDA ZELLENTIN
Institute for Political and European Studies
The University of Cologne'
"East European AttitudesToward
West Europedn Integration"
'W/rfllIrCH MOR~AWIECKI

..a l

ACID CAMP-Ben Van Meter
A hip New American Cinema comedy combining slapstick, sex,
and psychedelica.

Dylan. A candid documentary depicting the October, 1967 non-
violent anti-draft demonstration at the Oakland induction cen-
ter that led to the arrest of Joan Baez and 120 pacifists.

I

Lyd is

A

J

W WWI-% 2 a "Ps 1 104, A %P

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