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July 12, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-07-12

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Friday, July 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Artn re a

__ i
,.

raei nre

a.

Joint Chiefs endorse,
arms treaty in Senate

Clifford to

fly

to

Vietnam for

WASHINGTON (F)-The De-
fense Department endorsed the
nuclear nonproliferation treaty
yesterday as "an important step
forward toward new forms of sec-
urity" and said it gives cautious
encouragement to prospects for
further U.S.-Soviet disarmament
deals. '
Gen. Earle G. Wheeler, chair-
man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,
told the Senate Foreign Relations
committee the Joint Chiefs sup-
port the treaty's aims-to outlaw

the spread of atomic arms-and
view the pact as "not inimical to
U.S. security interests."
Few objections were heard as
the committee under acting
Chairman John J. Sparkman, (D-
Ala), moved through its second
day of hearings on the treaty
which President Johnson wants
ratified by the Senate before its
Aug. 3 adjournment target date.
Besides barring the nuclear
powers from giving atomic wea-
pons to nonnuclear nations and

prohibiting the have-not states-
from acquiring such arms, the
treaty also calls for good-faith
negotiations soon on restraining
the nuclear race and on general
disarmament.
The senators showed special in-
terest in this provision because
they have voted to begin a multi-
billion-dollar antiballistic missile
defense system.
Sen. Stuart Symington (D-Mo)
onetime secretary of the Air Force,
led those arguing against starting
a U.S. ABM system now.
With the new drive on for
agreements with the Soviets on
curbing the expensive missile com-
petition, Symington said, "it seems
to me directly contrary to the
spirit if not the letter of detente
easing relations" to launch a U.S.
antimissile system at this time.
But Paul Nitze, Deputy Defense
Secretary, maintained "it 'would
be a mistake to hold up the de-
velopment of the ABM."
Until there is an agreement with
the Russians, he said, America
should not "suspend taking actions
in its own defense."
Nitze said the Defense Depart-
ment "is under no illusion that we
need no longer worry about the
proliferation of nuclear weapons."
He and Wheeler both reported
that the U.S. military had a voice
in negotiating the treaty which is
"fully compatible with our secur-
ity requirements."
The defense spokesmen stated
also the United States should not
undertake one-sided disarmament,
and should have verification in
any future arm reduction accords.

strateg tak
WASHINGTON (R) - Secretary of Defense Clark M. Clifford
is going to Vietnam tomorrow for battlefield talks in advance of an
expected new enemy offensive.
It will be his first trip to the war area as defense chief.
Clifford said yesterday Gen. Earle G. Wheeler, chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff, and other high officials will accompany him
for a war appraisal from the new commander, Gen. Creighton W.
Abrams.
Clifford told a news conference that intelligence reports the
North Vietnamese and Viet Cong have built up their strength to
eight divisions of more, just below
Ithe Demilitarized Zone, as well as
increased activity around Saigon.
"So I believe we must anticipate
.the possibility of a new offensive
on the part of enemy forces in -
July or possibly August and Gen. inceases
Wheeler and I will wish to talk
this out in great detail with Gen.
Abrams and his chief commanders
in the field," he said.
Clifford said the level of com-
bat has dropped' somte in the past

,1

-Associated Press
Clearing out the enemy
CLARK TESTIMONY:
Fortas,,selection le gal1

I

WASHINGTON (P)-Atty. Gen.
Ramsey Clark yesterday defend-
ed the legality of President John-
son's appointment of Abe Fortas
to replace Earl Warren as chief
justice of the Supreme Court.
Testifying before the Senate
Judiciary Committee, the nation's
top law officer said scores of new
federal judges have been nom-
inated while the judges they were
to replace were still sitting.

-Associated Press

Wheeler and Nitze

UNDERGROUND at

I
1 " * 1

A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT PROGRAM OF EXPERIMENTAL, PSYCHEDELIC, ANIMATED, DOCUMEN-
TARY, OLD-TIME COMEDY, AND OTHER OUT-OF-THE-ORDINARY FILMS IS PRESENTED EACH WEEK
END -
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENING-11:00 P.M. & 1:00 A.M.-SATURDAY MATINEES 3:00 & 5:00
NOTICE: the difficulty experienced with the sound lost week has been fixed
PROGRAM FOR FRI.-cnd SAT., JULY 12 and 13
UNDERGROUND PROGRAM -JULY 12 & 13,

"It is vital for the President and
Congresss to keep the judiciary
full so it can perform its service,"
Clark said of Earl Warren's deci-
sion to stay on as chief justice
until Fortas is confirmed.
Beyond that, Clark rejected as
the product of "a conspiratorial
view of life". the notion that War-
ren tried to influence the choice
of Fortas as his successor.
Still, Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr. (D-
NC), and a group of committee
Republicans appeared intent on at
least trying to stall Fortas' con-
firmation.
After the two-hour session with
Clark broke up; Ervin told report-
ers he would question Fortas
about the "judicial philosophy" at'
a committee session Tuesday.
Since Fortas already is a Su-
preme Court justice and may be
reluctant to reply to such ques-
TONIGHT & TOMORROW
THE
SILENT
WORLD
COLOR. 1956. Jacques
Cousteau's award-winning
documentary on life
under the sea.
Short: "NIGHT OWLS"
with Laurel & Hardy
7:00 & 8:05-Architecture Aud.
75c

tions, the confronta'tion is likely
to be sticky.
Ervin said the committee has
questioned many court nominees
about their philosophy, but he
did not respond directly when
asked by a reporter if such ques-
tions had been put to a sitting
justice.
The Republicans who bore in
on Clark were Sens. Roman L.
Hruska of Nebraska, Hiram L.
Fong of Hawaii and Strom Thur-
mond of South Carolina.
Hruska suggested a "constitu-
tionalcrisis" could develop from
the way he said Warren made his
retirement conditional on ap-
proval of a successor.
For example, Hruska said, one
could occur if Fortas is turned
down by the Senate, the new pres-
ident who takes over in January
makes Warren's retirement effec-
tive immediately and the chief
Justice refuse to step down.
Clark said questions like these
are irrtlevant. He insisted the
Senate'sprincipal jop is to pass
on Fortas' qualifications to be
chief justice and those of Homer
TIhornberry of the U.S. Circuit
Court, in New Orleans to be an
associate justice.

few weeks and, "Some would look
at this as possibly a hopeful sign."
Clifford said he believes "we
must face the reality" of stepped-
up enemy activity and the poten-
tial for new attacks.
lie was less optimistic .than
South Vietnam President Nguyen
Van Thieu, who said earlier in the
week it might be possible to with-
draw some U.S. troops from Viet-
nam late next year. .
"In the absence of some develop-
ment in Paris that would affect
the presence or withdrawal of
Americans in South Vietnam,' I
would be unwilling at this time
to predict the withdrawal of any
American troops in 1969," Clifford
said.
"I believe we must proceed on
the assumption that if the enemy
chooses to fight that we must re-
main there."
After spending "a celtain time"
in Saigon. and South' Vietnam,
the Clifford team will go to Hono
lulu for President Johnson's sched-
uled conference with Thieu.
The Clifford group will include
William Bundy, assistant secretary
of state for East Asian and Pacific
affairs; PaulW Warnke, assistant
secretary of defense for Interna-
tional security affairs and others.

ACID CAMP-Ben Van Meter
A hip New American Cinema comedy combining slapstick, sex/
and psychedelica.
FAT FEET-Red Grooms r
A humorous, exotic documentary on city life, using both anima-
tion and pixillation techniques to express the mystery and fan-
tasy of city dwellers.
CONCERTO EROTICA-Jannik Hostrup
the award-winning Danish cartoon film about mountain climbdrs
exploring what turns out to be the nude body of a giant woman,.
PEACE PICKETS ARRESTED-Leonard Henny
Singing, clapping, speak-out by Joan Baez; songtext by Bob

Dylan. A candid documentary depicting the October, 1967 non-
violent anti-draft demonstration at the Oakland induction cen-
ter that led to the arrest of Joan Baez and 120 pacifists.
THE EIGHTH DAY-Charles F. Gagnon
The controversial film highlighting the Christian Exhibition at
Montreal's Expo '67; similar, in content to Bruce Conner's A
MOV IE.
7362-Patrick O'Neill
Abstract sound score by Joseph Byrd a Michael Moore. The
most highly acclaimed psychedelic abstract film since LAPIS! A
combination of innumerable optical techniques, this film hints at
the schizophrenic condition of our 20th Century mechanical-
conformist society, using, in part, Rorschach tests in motion and
schizoid distortions of the nude female form.

i,

New York

to creat

slow

.

C4R1lOL WRl~I
M1AINS
STARDOM IN

I

more summer jobs,
NEW YORK OIP)-Mayor John $18,000-a-year executived
V. Lindsay announced yesterday of- the city's Neighborhood
that the city will commit at least Corps and a leader of th
$3 million extra to create 10,000 Hai demonstration, joined
more summer jobs for city youths. in the plea for more func
The announcement came a day Javits said the City H
after a rally of 1,500 young people order was "only going t
demanding more summer jobs and drag on our efforts to get
protesting federal cuts in Neigh- . . . It is my duty to tell y
borhood Youth Corps antipoverty it takes the heart out ofc
funds erupted in violence at City forts . . . Society cannott
Hall. . ' rioting."
The extra city money would City Councilman Josep
be added to an additional $1 mil- dugno, whose auto was w
lion in Youth Corps funds that Sec- by the rampaging demons
retary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz demanded Mayor John V.)
said Wednesday night the city fire Smith for initiating th
would get. Previous allocations will that led to the disorder.
pay for 25,000 summer jobs. highly reprehensible, to s
In another development, Sen. least, that taxpayers' funds
Jacob K. Javits and city Job Corps be used to subsidize violen
leaders, called on President John- lessnes and rebellion," he
son for emergency measures that Lindsay.
would help get 67,000 summer jobs Smith said he was con
for New York City youths. about the outbreak. He s
The New York Republican sen- was inside City Hall when'
ator said'' that money could be curred and could note
appropriated by Congress "with- leadership.
in 24 hours." The city will have eve
Paul O'Dwyer, Javits' Demo- money than it expectedi
cratic opponent in the November summer job program, L
election, and Willie J., Smith, learned Wednesday.

director
Youth
he City
Javits,
ds.
all dis-
o be a
money,
ou that
our ef--
tolerate
h Mo-
wrecked
trators,
Lindsayl
he rally
"It is
say the
sshould
ce, law-
wrote
ncerned
aid he
n it oc-
exercise
en less
for its
Lindsay

SAIGON ())-The rising tempo
of U.S. air blows at storage areas
and communications in North
Vietnam's southern panhandle has
apparently lured MIG jets out to
battle, U.S. sources said yester-
day.
They pointed to two MIGs shot
down in dogfights Tuesday' and
Wednesday in the panhandle;
where no enemy planes once
dared to appear.
Most of North Vietnam's 75 or
so MIGs were based in China to
escape air power until President
Johnson on March 31 declared
most of North Vietnam off limits
to bombers.
One U.S. source said there has
been "an increase in' the number
of Communist MIGs deployed in
North Vietnam."
There have been previous re-
ports that some of the MIGs had
been flown to bases around Hanoi,
the cap ital," and Haiphong, the
principal port, since Johnson is-
sued hids order.
Now apparently some of the
North 'Vietnamese planes have
been flown to bases south of Hanoi
to meet U.S. planes blasting away
at North Vietnam's men, weapons
and supplies moving southward
into South Vietnam.
Intelligence reports have told
of increased.North. Vietnamese in-
filtration into Souith Vietnam for
weeks, and U.S. planes/have been
making a concentrated drive to
disrupt it.
Intensive ground sweeps went
on around Saigon to break up an
expected new enemy drive on the
capital. U.S. 25th Infantry Divi-
sion troops reported they killed
23 enemy soldiers in a 7%2-hour
battle Wednesday 32 miles'north-
west of Saigon.
South Vietnamese troops found
four weapons caches yesterday 15
miles northwest of Saigon. The
caches include automatic weapons
and ,ammunition.
U.S. Air Force B52 bombers
dropped ,their huge bomb loads
early yesterday in three provinces
around Saigon. The Stratofortress
targets were suspected troop con-
centrations, camps and supply
bases. The big bombers have been
playing a leading role in the at-
tempt to disrupt an enemy attack
on Saigon.
Reflecting the comparative lull
in fighting in recent 'weeks, U.S.
headquarters reported 198 Amer-
ncans killed and 1,248 wounded
last week, the second lowest casu-
alty toll this year.
This raised total U.S. casualties
since Jan. 1, 1961 to 25,752 killed
and 160,691 wounded. There were
46 non-combat deaths last week,
bringing that total tto 4,188.'

(cow,
IJ
A FEMININE ALFIE'!
Carol White emerges as a
rival of Julie Christie
& Faye Dunaway,
A STAR IS BORN!"
-Wanda Hale. N.Y. Daily News
'ONE OF THE YEAR'S //.F4
5 BEST! The sizzling
diary of a girl whose
life swings like a
pendulum between r
two men!"
-Robert SalmaggiWINS Radio.
if you are squeamish, may we recommend' ,
that you do not watch the first five minutes s
of 'Poor Cow" during which an actual t
birth scene is vividly and graphically 1 '" /
portrayed on the screen.
-The Management,
National General Pictures presents
A Joseph Janni Production
Terence Stamp
as Dave
Carol'White in ' '
POOR 00w"
Technicolor*
Screenplay by Nell Dunn and Kenneth Loach4
1G ,,.. , 4.. ,z, ..n .1 n ". . h(* li.*,''r ... ..,,r

-tt

Areents'
DAVID BAR-ILLAN

Israeli Pianist
TUES., JULY 16
at 8:30 P.M.
in Rackham Auditorium
(appearing in the Summer Concert Series)
PROGRAM
Feux d'artifice .... Debussy
Gavotte and Variations ...:.. ... .. . .. Raieau
"Eroica" Variations, Op. 35 .Beethoven
Pieces for Piano, Op. 34 . ... .. ..... Paul Ben-Haim
Nocturne in D-flat, Op. 27, No. 2,....>.........Chopin
Nocturne in F, Op. 15, No. 1 ........... . ..... Chopin
Scherzo No. 3 in C-sharp minor . ..... ...... Chopin

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