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July 03, 1968 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1968-07-03

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Page Sias

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, July 3, 1968

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, July 3, 1968

Amateurs Graebner, Ashe

reach

Wimbledon

semis

WIMBLEDON, England (R) -
American amateurs Arthur Ashe
and Clark Graebner advanced into
the semifinals of Wimbledon's
history-making open lawn tennis
championship yesterday and put
up the best show for Uncle Sam
since 1959.
Ashe and Graebner, the ama-
teur heroes of a world cham-
pionship matching every big name
in tennis, face a couple of pro-
fessionals in the semifinals.
Ashe will meet the top pro in
the world, Australia's Rod Laver,
and Graebner will play another
Australian pro, Tony Roche.
The pairings brig about what
officials of the All England Club
had always hoped for-a confron-
tation between the tennis greats
irrespective of whether they play
for money or fun.
Ashe, seeded 13th from Rich-
mond, Va., defeated Tom Okker,
the Dutch amateur whowas seed-
ed 12th, 7-9, 9-7, 9-7, 6-2 in the
quarter-finals on another sun-
baked day at Wimbledon. The
lithe Army lieutenant served 18
aces to Okker's three.
The unseeded Graebner from
New York used his booming serv-
ice to defeat Ray Moore of South
Africa 6-3, 6-0, 9-7.
Laver, 29-year-old top seed
here, had a five-set battle against
Dennis Ralston of Bakersfield,
Calif. The Aussie finally won 4-6,
6-3, 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. 1
And Roche, the 15th seed from
Australia who knocked out sec-
ond-seeded Ken Rosewall Mon-
day defeatedt10th-seeded Earl
Buchholz of St. Louis, 3-6, 7-5,
6-4, 6-4. Buchholz was handicap-
ped by a groin injury.
The last time the United States
had two men in the semi-finals
was in 1959, the year Peruvian
Alex Olmedo, then playing under
the stars and stripes, defeated
Laver. The other semi-finalist was
Barry MacKay.
The first open Wimbledon, de-
spite rain in the first week, had
fans thrilled with the unexpected.
"I take every match as I find
it," said Graebner after his vic-
tory over Moore. "The seirvice still
is holding up, and I'm feeling as
fit now as I did at the start of the
week."
Graebner defeated 11th-seeded
Fred Stolle of Australia Monday
on his way to the semifinals and
against Moore his service held pup
well. He broke through for an
8-7 lead in the third set and then
calmly served out the match.
Ashe had a serve and volley
duel with Okker, the giant-killing
Dutchmanmany thought would
take the crown, and it was a
fascinating affair for the fans.
The match had the 17,000 spec-
tators on the center court en-
thralled for over two hours.
Ashe paced himself well, and in
the end his service took him into
the .semifinals. The American
Davis Cup player's backhand col-
lected vital points in the late

*

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NFL veterans' vote decisive in favor of strike

ATLANTA (P)-Rankin Smith,'
owner of the Atlanta Falcons and
a member of the National Foot-
ball League's Player Relations
Committee, said yesterday the
players have rejected the owners'
offers aimed at averting a player
strike.
In Knoxville, Tenn., the News-
Sentinel said the players have
voted 377-17 not to report to pre-
season training camps.
In Atlanta, Smith's statement
said the owners had agreed to in-
crease pension funds by 25 per
cent in 1968 and 1969 but said the
owners could not commit them-
selves past 1969 because of the
1970 merger with the American
Football League.
"We regret exceedingly that the
players have rejected the ,nego-
tiations," his statement said. "We
think the players may not have
understood our position."
He said the owners felt agree-
ment had been reached at Detroit
except on the matter of pensions.
The Knoxville paper did not
agree.
"There figures to be a strike
unless the NFL club owners and

'the players association come to,
.an agreement this week," the
News-Sentinel added.
Club owners and players repre-
sentatives met in Detroit last week
to discuss ,demands of Nthe NFL
Players' Association. '
The News-Sentinel said the
owners offered at the sessions to
pay an additional $14,000 per
club into the players' pension
fund and $350 for each exhibition

game for players with five) years
experience and $300 for those with
four years experience.
The newspaper said it learned
that players on several teams, in-
cluding the champion Green Bay
Packers and Baltimore Colts,
voted unanimously to strike.
Rookies are scheduled to begin
reporting for practice next week.
Veterans will report later. Re-
porting dates vary for each club.

The Players Association has
been seeking. a minimum salary
rsimilar to that of baseball's major
leagues. NFL players now get an
alowance of $10 a day when in
training or playing an exhibition
game. They want $500 for each
exhibition game.
Management of- the 16 clubs
have contended the demands are
excessive, not commensurate with
the clubs' receipts. The Players
Association has asked to be shown

which team profit margins can-
not support the additional pay-
ments.
In. Atlanta, Falcons' defensive
end Sam Williams said about 80
per cent of the NFL players had
been contacted and that player
representatives hoped to contact
the rest of them by today.
An authoritative source in At-
lanta said about 97 per cent of
the players contacted were not
satisfied with the owners' offers,

SHUN CEREMONIES:
Black athletes plan new Olympic protests

.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-A Negro
newspaper man said yesterday all
black athletes who qualify will
participate for the United States
in the Mexico City Olympics -
but will show their discontent by
shunning the victory stand and
possibly the opening ceremonies
parade.
The newspaperman said the de-

cision was made at last weekend's
Olympic trials at Los Angeles,
which he attended.
The newsman, who requested
anonymity, said "I couldn't name
one black athlete who will not go
to the Olympics if he qualifies.
"But they decided there are
other ways to demonstrate their
disgust with their situation."

Canham tackles new job with ideas;
physical plant, staff changes, result

-Associated Press
ARTHUR ASHE, American Davis cup star, displays a powerful
forehand in yesterday's quarterfinals of the All England Tennis
Championships at Wimbledon. Both Ashe and Cup teammate
Clark Graebner reached the semifinals, giving the U.S. its finest

I Wimbledon showing since 1959,
MacKay was a semifinalist.
stages and then he sent over a
screaming service that Okker
could not return. t
Buchholz was troubled by the
groin injury that has plagued him
throughout a Wimbledon cham-
pionship that started in rain and,
gusty winds and changed into
torrid heat in the second week.
The winner of the men's singles.
if he is a pro will collect $4,800,
with the runner-up getting $3,120.
The losing semifinalists get $1,800
each.
Ashe and Graebner are playing
solely for expenses. Layer and
Roche are shooting for the prize
money.
If Ashe and Graebner should
get through to the final, the
Wimbledongorganizers will save
$7,920.
Okker, as a beaten quarter-fi-,
nalist, collected $960. He is a ra-
gistered player, a classification
somewhere in between an amateur
and a full pro. He is under the
jurisdiction of the Dutch Na-
tional Tennis Association but is
allowed to accept prize money.

when ex-Michigan star Barry
daily
spor-ets
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN
Major Lea ge
Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet.

Twins' Carew benched after
missing pre-game warmups

MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. (P-All-
Star second baseman Rod Carew
was benched last night by Min-
nesota Twins Manager Cal Ermer
after Carew disappeared from the
team hotel and showed up just
before the game with the Cleve-
land Indians.
The Minneapolis Tribune re-
ported in today's edition that
Carew piled his luggage intoha
taxicab in front of the Cleveland
Hotel at 4:25 p.m. EDT and re-
portedly headed for the airport.
"I don't have to talk to you or
to the manager or to the owner,
and that's all I'm going to say,"
DwayneNetland, Tribune base-
ball writer, quoted Carew as say-
ing in a dispatch from Cleveland.
Netlandsaid Carew, 22, told his
roommate, Tony Oliva, that he'
might jump the club when they
returned to the hotel Monday
night after a 4-1 Twins' loss to
the Indians.
Ermer was told that Carew was
gone when he arrived at Muni-
cipal Stadium. He instructed coach
John Goryl to go to the airport;
to find the player.
Netland said Carew appeared
in the clubhouse at 6:50 p.m., EDT
as the, Twins were coming in from
batting practice. Ermer ordered
the room cleared for a team meet-
ing.

Carew, the American League
All-Star second baseman a year
ago when he won the Rookie of
the Year award, had been picked
off second base in the ninth in-
ning Monday night.
"That was a cardinal sin," said
Ermer, "A cardinal sin. I was:
going to mention it to him at the
time but thought better of it.
I'll bring it up later."
In Minneapolis, Twins President
Calvin Griffith said he would
withhold details of any disciplin-
ary action until he had talked with
Carew.
"'This isn't the first time Rod-
ney has done this," said Griffith.
"He jumped minor league clubs in
Wilson, N.C., and Orlando, Fla."

Detroit 50 27 .6-19
Clev elad 43i 37 .538
Baltimore 38 38 ,5211
'Wnnesota 39 36, .520
Oakland 38 38 .5001
California 37 39 .487
nostfon 36 38 .4861
New York 33 40 .4521
Chicago :2 40 .4441
Washing~lt 28 44 .3891
s Iesterday's Results
,Detroit 3, California I
Minnesota 6. Cleveland 0
Boston 4, Oakland 3
New York at Washington, rain
Chicago at Baltimore, rain
Today'"S Games
California at Detroit, night
Minnesota at Cleveland, night
Neiw York Mt Washington, night
Chicago at Baltimore, night
Oakland at Boston, night
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
xSt. Louis 47 30 .610
xAtlanta 40 36 .526
xSan Francisco 40 38 .513
Pittsburgh 37 36 .507
:Los :Angeles 40 39 -506
Cincinnati 38 38 .500
New York 36 39 .480
Philadelphia 34 37 .4791
Chicago 34 42 .4471
1Il1uston 33 44 .4291
x-Late game not included
Yesterda's Results
Chicago 5, Philadelphia 3
Pittsburgh 2, New York I
Houston 2, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis at Los Angeles uic.
Atlanta ateSanI rancisco, inc.
Today's Games
Pittsburgh at New York
P'hiladelphia at Chicago
Atlanta at San Franicisco
Cincinnati at Houston, night
St. Louis at Los Angeles, night

1
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GB
10
10
11 if
1
15'
15'
19 ,

(Continued from Page 1)
"I've narrowed down the field
to three candidates for the recre-
ation associate," Canham said
yesterday. "The problems with in-
tramurals will become urgent
when students return in the fall
so I'll probably make my decision
by the end of August."
Canham is postponing his ap-
pointment for the other position.
"The associate director of inter-
collegiate athletics is a new job
and I won't be able to select a
man to fill it until I've set up his
specific duties," Canham said.
"Another position, administrative
assistant, is also vacant and I
want to get that situation settled
first."I
Canham's appointment of Ken
track coach was a first for the
Burnley, a Negro, as assistant
athletic department. "I wanted
Ken because he was qualified and
could help us. That's the way I'm
going to make all my appoint-
ments and that's probably the only
reason any black coach would
want to come here," Canhan de-
clared.
teams have a record of over 80
coach was a first for the athletic
department. "I wanted Ken be-
cause he was qualified and could
help us. That's the way I'm going
to make all my appointments and
that's probably the only reason
any black coach would want to
come here," Canham declared.
Canham met with University
President Robben Fleming and
several black students following
last April's lock-in inside the Ad-
ministration Bldg. He also met
privately with two black student
representatives and came to a
"profitable mutual understanding"
with them about the hiring of
black coaches.
The blacks had demanded the
immediate hiring of more black
coaches to the athletic staff.
Canham's record as a track
coach has been impressive. In his
19 years as Michigan track coach,
his teams have won 12 Big Ten
track championships, indoor and
outdoor, and have placed second
14 times.
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Pressed for specifics,' he said'
they have decided not to appear
on the victors' stand, where the
first three in each event receive
their gold, silver or bronze medals.
What else? Very probably, he
said, they will not march in the
opening parade of athletes of all
participating nations, and perhaps
not in the closing parade,either.
The-newsman said there is no
chance that Lee Evans, Tommie
Smith, John Carlos, Bob Beaman
or Jim Hines -- to name five Ne-
gro stars - would pass up the
Olympics, although they havel
been outspoken in favor of some
type of boycott action.
"I believe all blacks support the
boycott," he said of the Negro
masses. He added:
"You should have seen the re-
action at the Los Angeles trial.
They had a big spectacle to open
the program both days. It was
aimed at the blacks.
"They had movie and TV stars
saying such corny things as
"you're not only athletes, but you
represent a free country . , . a
country that practices fair play
for all."
He also said that all Negroes -I
athletes and fans - observed!
dead silence when Jesse Owens,
the only track star ever to win
four gold medals in one Olympics
(1936) pleaded for.l 00 per cent
cooperation of everyone to give
Olympic hero
Owens on A. L.
publicity, Staff
BOSTON (RP)-Jesse Owens,
winner of four gold medals in
track at the 1936 Olympics, has
,been added to the American
+League's public relations staff, the
league announced yesterday.
League president Joseph E.
Cronin said Owens will do public
relations and promotion work.
"Jesse is a man of wide experi-
ence in many fields and he will
be of great value to us," Cronin,
said.
The 55-year-old Owens now
operates his own public relations
firm in Chicago. The league said'
he will continue to reside there.I

the United States its best possible
team.
Owens, a Negro, has opposed
the boycott from the start.
The newsman said the Negroes,
went to Los Angeles determined
to shut out the whites, as nearly
as possible, in the trials.
"That was their. goal," he re-
ported, "to shut the whites out
of the first four places in the pre-
liminary heats. They didn't care
about times, or setting records."
That, he , conceded. may have
been one reason no #orld and
only one American record was set.
He said "black athletes got eight
of ten places in-the 100 yard dash,
the top four in the 400, and were
best in the long jump, triple jump,
200 and hurdles."
193 ah letes
invi~ted for
ITahoe cam
LOS ANGELES (Pi-A, huge
squad of 193 has been invited to
the United States men's Olympic
Track and Field high altitude
training camp as the threat of a
boycott by Negro athletes con-
tinues.
The Olympic Track and Field,
Committee. announced its selec-
tions Monday, the same day that
boycott architect Harry Edwards
told newsmen in San F rancisco
that plans had been approved but
refused to reveal what they were.
In announcing the squad, the
committee named as many as ten
athletes to some events. Officially,
the committee said this was to in-
sure sufficient competion at South
Lake Tahoe during the training.
Some, however, saw the big
squad as a method of having
enough white athletes in training
in the event a boycott drama-
tizing racial unrest becomes a
reality.
For instance, all eight finalists
in the 100-meter dash of the
Olympic trials on Saturday were
Negroes. Added to the squad were
two Caucasions, Jerry Bright of
Arizona State and Larry Questad,
former NCAA champion from
I Stanford.

ill
4
4

-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
DON CANHAM, new Michigan Athletic y Director, responds to
one of numberless phone calls that demand his attention daily.
The ex-Wolverine track coach has completed only two days in
his new office, but has already been responsible for the de-
velopment of plans for improved intramural and intercollegiate
athletic facilities.

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123:4.
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Volunteer for McCarthy
PETITION DRIVE
Workers Needed Through Summer
Call: 769-1173 or 971-4183
STUDENTS for McCARTHY

VINS do FRANCE
Last Chance Jet Flight fo London
JULY 28- AUGUST 31

Few seats left

Financing available

I

Phone 761-4146 or 663-3969

L

c;

FRIDAY, JULY 5
DINNER--DISCUSSION

6 P.M.

41

Mlaises Hamburger 6"on an Oversized Toasted Roll

"IS AMERICA MORE VIOLENT
THAN OTHER NATIONS ?"
MRS. LE THI ANN,
Vietnamese Writer and Philosopher

I

'I

Ecumenical Campus Center
Dinner (50c) Reservations:

921 Church
662-5529

SANDALs
For Quality and Good T aste

If It's Good Food Y'want-Go to Blaises at the Sheraton Ann Arbor Inn

I

J

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