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June 27, 1968 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-27

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, June 27,' 1968

v i s ,.

Baseball

execs call for

NEW YORK (P) - Baseball's
executive council, heeding Com-
niissioner William D. Eckert's call
for a "united front,'' has recom-
mended uniform scheduling and
division play next year when the
major leagues expand to 12 teams
apiece.
Following a eeting in New
Yorc yesterday he five-man ex-
ecutive council, headed by the
commissioner, unanimously rec-

ommendea that the National The two leagues will act on the nounced it will go to two division
League adopt a two-division set- recommendations in Houston July of six teams each and will cut it
up and the American League re- 10, the day after the All-Star schedule to 156 games followe
tain the present 162-game sched- Game in the Astrodome. by a play-off between division
ule. The American League has an- champions, with the winner ad
FIVE REPEATERS
Freehan, Horton Aall-star picks

TheTexas WdgC
By DREW BdGEMAE
One of the most interesting aspects of the game of golf
is its infinite capacity to confuise, coerce, frustrate, inhibit,
,and deflate the participant. After a punishing four hours atE
the sport, the normal amount of time required to play eighteen
holes, the "Sunday-sprayer" or the "touring pro" may vow t
never to return to the game.
Yet, invariably, the magnetism of a possible "hole-in-
one", a "birdie", an "eagle", or a 'sub-par" round, which golff
holds as its main attractions, will bring even the most deter- E
mined individual back to the first tee.t
No 'matter where the ball is hit, what course one plays 1
on (be it Oakland Hills or Dry Gulch Valley), what club j
one uses, what part of the green the pin is located on, each e
shot presents to the participant an entirely new and unique t
experience.
Many in the past have commented upon the infinite 1
stupidity of hitting a little white ball into a hole some two,1
three, four, or five hundred yards away.
In the future, however, it is not entirely unlikely that our .
descendants will regard the game as the intellectual test oft
the 20th \century. It is a serious game to millions, and today,
it is regarded more as an extension of concentration and E
tension than an opportunity for relaxation.
This is not because the game presents an intellectual
challenge in choosing alternative strategies. One's strategies
are fairly well defined before he tees up his ball on the first
tee. His aim may be the "sub-par" round or a par on a 135-k
yard par 3; defeat of his opponent in match play, regardless 1
of his score, or the lowest score in the field in medal play.t
His conscious tactics vary according to his ability. If his E
handicap is under five, he will probably seek to control the l
speed of his backswing, the movement of his hips, the speed
of the clubhead, the juxtaposition of his feet in his stance, ors
the never-ending temptation of exerting too much force in the E
grip with his right hand.,
If Rhs handicap is over five, the participant will probably I
seek to establish a traditional pattern of striking the ball,
regardless of form, as long as the outcome conforms to t
previous expectations.t
However, the dilemma of the golfer is defined by the
choice of tactics. He may have "skyed" his drive off the ninth c
tee at the 'U' course and attempt the miraculous feat of hitting E
a two or three wood over the large and hostile pond that sep- t
arates the golfer from the green, for the exubeating effect
of a birdie; or he may hit a five iron for position in order
to garner an easy par.
He may have pulled his iron shot on the fifth hole into
one of the large and dangerous sand traps that encircle the
horseshoe-shaped green. Should he attempt to "blast" the ball
onto the green with his "sand wedge", "baby" the ball out
of the trap with a half-swing, or use his "Texas wedge" (his
putter) to rap the ball with all "deliberate speed."
The tactics one uses to implement his goals vary according
to a whole host of factors, such as the lie of the ball, the
confidence the player has with the club in question, the degree
of urgency defined by the player's performance in his match
(or if playing alone, with his expectations), the distance of the
player from the green, the weather conditions, and the con-
dition of the course.
The game presents an intellectual challenge to the knowl-
edgeable and experienced participant because it comes to grips
with a basic human dilemma; each shot presents the golfer,
regardless of talent, with a subconscious decision: that of play-
ing for position (the rational choice) or of playing for dis-
tance (the illusionary tragedy).
Every golfer remembers the sensuous delight following the
really spectacular shot - the shot that may seem common-
place for a Nicklaus, Palmer, or a Trevino. Nevertheless, a
250-yard drive, or a seventy-five foot putt, or a sand shot
that manages to fall into the hole, brings any golfer a thrill
unique to human experience; it instantly inflates his ego and
forces him to constantly seek to duplicate "the shot."
This pressure works two ways: it may, on one hand, force
him into making .quick and hasty decisions that have dis-
astrous consequences to his form, or, on the other hand, the
truly spectacular shot brings the incentive for returning an-
other afternoon to the links.
However, as the performance of Ben Hogan (the game's
greatest shotmaker) or Arnold Palmer over the past few years
indicates, no matter how much practice, how much ability, or
how many lessons, no golfer will ever master the game. The
game will remain equally frustrating to the touring profes-
sional as to the "Sunday-sprayer."

The Detroit Tigers placed two
men on the 1968 American League
All-Star team announced yester-
day by Baseball Commissioner
William Eckert.,
Both Bill kFreehan and 'Willie
Horton were voted spots in the
starting lineup for the game
against the National League's best
in Houston's Astrodome on, July
ninth.
Freehan, the Tiger catcher, was
a near-unanimous choice, getting
248 of, a. possible 251 votes for5
the starting job. Boston's Carl
Yastrzemski received 246 votes'}to
lead balloting for Outfielders.
Horton was third in the voting
for outfielders behind Yastrzemski
and Frank Howard of Washing-
ton. Howard. and Horton are the'
league's leading home run hitters'
with 24 and 18, respectively.
Oddly enough, all three fielders
elected to start play in left for
their own clubs. A recent rules
change allows for outfielders to
be chosen "at' large" instead' of
by their regular positions.
-Joining Freehan and Yastrzein-
ski in the junior circuit lineup}
will be three other repeaters from
the 1967 squad.
Harmon Killebrew (first base)
and Rod Carew (second) will rep-
resent Minnesota for the second
straight year, while Boog Powell of
Baltimore will be a repeat starter
at third.
The final infield position will}
be, covered by California's Jim
Fregosi, the shortstop who played
the final 11 innings of the Nation-
al League's 15-inning, 2-1 win
last year.
The pitchers for the 25-man
American League team will be
selected later this week by Man-
ager Dick Williams of Boston, as
will the back-up men at all other
positions.
Through Monday night, Yas-
trzemski was the only member of
the eight-man starting team with
a batting average above .300,with
a .320 mark. The 1967, triple-
crown winner has socked 11 hom-
ers and knocked in 29 runs after
slumping badly early in the sea-
son.
ALL-STAR VOTING
FIRST BASE - Killebrew (Minn),
116; Powell (Balt), 106; .Horton
(Cleve), 32; :Mantle (NY), 1:,;
McCraw (Chi), 5; Harrelson (Bost).
2; Howard (Wash) and Webster and
Cater (Oak), 1.
SECOND BASE B--Carew (Min),
184; Johnson (Bait), 54; McAuliffe
(Det), 36; Knoop (Cal), 6; Andrews
(Bost), 1.
THIRD BASE - Robinson (Bait),
176; Alvis (Cleve), 51; Wert (Det),
32; McMullen (Wash), 15; Bando
(Oak), 3; Foy (Bost), 2.
SHORTSTOP - Fregosi (Cal),
173; Aparicio (Chi), 52; Campan-
eris (Oak), 27; Petrocelli (Bost), 20;
Tovar (Minn), 8.
OUTFIELD - Yastrzemski (Bost),
246; Howard (Wash),' 238; Hlorton
(Det), 193; Oliva (Minn), 48; liar-
relson (Bost), 47; Monday (Oak),
43; Pepitone (NY), 7; Robinson
(Bait) and White (NY), 4; Kalne
(Bet), 3; Stanley (Det) and Car-
denal (Cleve), 1.
CATCHER - Freehan (Det), 248;
Azcue (Cleve), 10; Howard (Bost),
7; Josephson (Chi), 6; Sims (Cleve)
4; Roseboro (Minn), 3; Gibbs (NY)
and Casanova (Wash), 1.

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

irnity
s vancing to the World Series.
s Last month, the National,
d League granted 1969 franchises'
n to Montreal and San Diego, then
- later announced it would stay
with one division and a 162-game
schedule.
"I have always advocated that
the two leagues move forward
jointly and present a united front
with the common aim - what is
best'for the baseball public," Eck-
ert said in calling for an end to
inter-league differences over ex-
pansion.
Fears had been expressed that
the excitement created by an
American League pennant playoff
between division champs would
detract from the prestige of a
National League pennant race in
September.
Unanimous approval of the Na-
tional League club owners is
necessary for a switch to two
divisions.
Under the American League's
divisional split Kansas City and
Seattle, the new clubs, will play
in the Western Division along
with Chicago, Minnesota, Califor-
nia and Oakland. Boston, New
York, Washington, Baltimore,
Cleveland and Detroit will be in
the Eastern Division.

The Daily Official Bulletinn isan 9
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibllity. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3528 L. S. & A. Bldg., be-
before 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear only once.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information cal 764-9270.
THURSDAY, JUNE 27
day Calendar
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business-"Instructional Design Work-
shop": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m. to
5:00 p.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Semi-,
nar-"New Frontiers in Management"
Statier Hilton Inn, 8:45 a.m. to 9:00
p.m.
I.E.E.E. Joint Automatic 'Control
Conference-First Session, Lecture Hall,
Rackham Building, 9:00 a.m.
Audio-Visual Education Center Sum-
mer Previews-Beethoven: Ordeal and
Triumph: Multipurpose Room, Under-
graduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Department of Speech; University
Players-William Shakespeare's "Troil-
us and Cressida": Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music Degree- Recital
John Peterson, Organ: Hill Auditorium,
8:00 p.m.t
University Musical Society-Alicia de
Larrocha, Pianist: Auditorium, Rack-
ham Building, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Special Notice to' Ushers for Sum-
mer Piano Concert Series-The first
concert in the Summer Piano Series,
which was scheduled for Thursday,
June 27th, in Rackham, has been post-
poned to July 31. A, replacement will
be announced later. Please report July
10th.
Regents' Meeting:'July 19. Commun-
ications for consideration at this meet-
ing must be in the President's hands
no later than July 3.
"Educational Testing Service French
and German Test. The Educational
Testing Service Test in French and
German administered by the Graduate
School for doctoral candidates is
scheduled for Thursday night, August
1, at 7 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hail. ALL students planning to take
the test must register by 4 p.m. Thurs-
day. August 1, at the Information
Desk in the lobby of the Rackham
Building. The fee is $6.00. For further
information call the Information Desk,
764-4415.
Doctoral
Examinations
Doctoral Examination for: Ki-Suck
Chung, Education, Dissertation: "A

BILL FREEHAN

I

r, , ti'''.F .F:{.r}.r. .K"~>Ki, . {'?rt'?l . K'.. , K m .~' K "d"F~ ~. . r *fl%.tJA' ? *"'v...,.. ... ... .st.S:;w " i1
DAILY OFFICIAL, BULLETI N

Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Detroit
Baltimore
Cleveland
Minnesota
?'Oaklan d
"California
Boston
New York
C hicago
Washington

w
46
:36
39
36
35
34
33
31
26

L
26
32
35
33
34
35
35
:17
38
41

Pet.
.639
.529
.527
.522
.507
.493
.485
.456
.441
.388

GB
8
8
8'.
13
14
17 '

Fifth straight
shutout can't~
faze Gibson
ST. LOUIS UP) - Bob Gibson,
who has everybody thinking about
shutouts, is trying to keep the
goose eggs off his mind.
"First you think about wins,"
said Gibson. who stretched his
scoreless -inning string to 47 with
his fifth straight! shutout, beating
Pittsburgh 3-0 in the first game
of a twi-night doubleheader yes-
terday.,
"Shutouts are secondary. Get
yourself preoccupied with shut-
outs and pretty soon you're be-
hind," said Gibson. "I'm not look-
ing forward to a shutout, I'm
looking forward to a win."
Gibson's string has him zeroing
in on the record of 58 2-3 score-
less innings established earlier this
season by Don Drysdale of Los
Angeles, scheduled to be Gibson's
opponent in his next scheduled
start Monday.
"Macht nichts" said Gibson of
the confrontation, slipping into
German to explain that Drysdale
as an opponent would make no
difference to him.'
Gibson said he felt particular-
ly strong against the Pirates and
stayed with mostly fastballs.
"I had six days rest since my
last start because of the rainout
Monday," said Gibson. "The
weather was cool and I felt good.
When you're not so strong, you
compensate with curves in the late
inings but I stayed with fastballs
today.'
Gibson said his control has been
better all year than it was last
year when he helped the Card nals
to the National League pennant
and then won three games in the
World Series.
' Could the improved control lead
him to the shutout record?
"I really don't care about it but
everybody talks about it," said
Gibson. "If I set a record
fine. I really don't care."

Study of Management Styles in Edu-
cational Organizations," on Thursday,
June 27 at 12:30 p.m. in Room 3206
University High School, Chairman: L.
W. Anderson.
Doctoral Examination for: LaMarr
Perry Miller, Education, Dissertation:
"An Investigation of Non-Intellectual
Factors in the Education of Selected
Negro High Schoor Students," on
Thursday, June 27 at 2:30 in Room
4018, University High School, Chair-
man: S. E. Dimond.
Doctoral Examination for: Patricia
Ruth Stocking Brown, Zoology, Dis-
sertation: "Growth Responses of Larval
and Postmetamorphic Rana pipiens to
Prolactine and Growth Hormone," on
Thursday, June 27 at 3 p.m. in Room
2111 Natural Science, Chairman: B. E.
Frye.
Doctoral Examination for: Harold
Edward Gascoigne, Engineering Me-
chanics, Dissertation: "T r a n s i e n t
Stresses in a Layered Thermoelastic
Media Generated by Impulsive Energy
Deposition," on Thursday, June 27 at,
3 p.m. in Room 219 West Engineering,'
Chairman: I. K. McIvor. .S
Doctoral Examination for: Robert
Roy Wilson, Education, Dissertation:'
"The Effects of Selected Program-
ming-Analog Techniques and Voice-
ContactonCompletion Behavior in
Correspondence Education," on Thurs-
day, June 27, at 4 p.m. in Room 3014
UHS, Acting Chairman: W. C. Trow.
Placement
August Graduates, placement serv-
ices in the summer at General Division
do not include interviews, however, we
receive position openings, listed in this
Daly Official Bulletin, n a current
Iopenngs notebook, and in a monthly
bulletin. Literature pertaining to com-
panies, opportunities in various fields
of study, and government employment
s open for browsing. Hours -- 8:30-12
and 1:30-4:30 Mon-Fri. Please inform
the Bureau of youir current address,
and any changes in your data if yo
are registered. Register for placement
services now if you have not already;
done so. Please report any jobs taken,
or offers, for statistical purposes used
in counseling.-
Peace Corps Week -- July 22-26, ar-
rangements to be announced later.
Vista Week - July 9-12, watch for
further announcements.
Current Position Openings received
by General Division by mail and
phone, please call 764-7460 for further
information:
Graphic Controls Corporation, Buf-
falo, N.Y.-New position working at all
levels of corporate management and
outside clients in training, and mgmt.
dev. Degree in Bus. Ad. Lib. Arts, Math
or other areas. Promote marketing of
Training and Development Services,
ie. 'contacts with outside clients, pre-
paration of promotional materials,
mktg. res., and pubi. relations.
Kelsey-Hayer Company, Romulus,
Mich.-New Product Planning BSME or
IL, good comnmunicati1on abilities, exper
WELCOME
STUDENTS.!
9 DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING for Men-
And Women-
OPEN 6 DAYS
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

ATTENTI9N
]FRESHMEN
Reserve your
textbooks NOW

in manuf. or engrg., leading to Sales
Business or Acctg. Managers. Sales
F&orecasting and Analysis, Bus Ad. or 0
Math degree, good grades in math and
acctg., courses in stat, helpful, future
in mktg. and other areas.
Heinz H. Schwartz, M.D., for newly
formed center in Flint, Mich.-Psy-
chiatric Social Workers for family
counseling,, MSW required.
Mental Ilealth Association of Mont-
gomery County, Inc., Dayton Ohio -A
Executive Director, Open Jan. 1, 69.
PhD. or MA in educ., psych., soc. wk.,
or soc. and 5 years as an agency exe-
cutive or community organizer.
State of Washingtok-Personnel As-
sistant, BA in bus., personnel.,.or publ.
admin., or social sciences. Medical So-
cial Work Consultant, two levels, co-
ordinates casework planning, MSW re-
quired for both, 3-4 years exper, high-
er levels requires one year min, in
supv. or consultative work. Delinquen-
cy Prevention Consultant, Bach. level
in soc. wk., soc., psych. and 4 years
exper in Juv. Del., or clinical or couns.
work with maladjusted children, one
year supv. work, or Graduate work in
these areas and two years.
Little, Brown and Company, College
Division, Boston, Mass. - College Re-
presentatives (3), call on professors
and promote use of their texts, 3 ter-
ri, open., Mich.-Ohio, Ill.-Ind., and
Wis.-Minn. Recent grad or alum, man,
lib. arts bckrnd,
ORGANiZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available i
in room 1011 SAB.
s s *
June 26, 1968
The Bach :Club will meet again on
Thursday, June 27, 1968, 8:00 p.m., at
the Guild House, 802 Monroe. All lovers
of any kind of music are ,invited to
join an informal. evening of music-
listening, talk, and jell donuts. For in-
formation call ,769-2922, 161-1688, 769-
1605, or '663-6361.
Christian Science Organizational Tes-
timony Meeting, Thursday, 7:30 p.m.
Room 3445 SAB.

Pick them up when you
return for fall classes.
NO CASH REQUIRED-all
advance orders guaranteed.
Save up to 13 on
Folletts used books.

1

*Late game not included.
Yesterday's Resdlts
Washington 8, Cleveland2
Baltimore 6, Boston 2
Oakland at California, inc.
Only games scheduled.
Today's Games
Minnesota at Baltimore, night
Cleveland at Boston, night
Only ,games scheduled.

Join
The Daily
Sports ,Staff

Drop in or maiil
your reservation card to
FOLLETTS
322 S. State St.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104

NATIONAL LEAGUE

St. Louis
San Francisco
Atlanta
Philadelphia
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
New York
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston

w
45
:9
37
37
3,5
34
33
30

L
28
34
34
32
37
36
36
36
40
41

Pet.
.616
.334
.521
.508
.500
.493
.486
.478
.437
.423

GB
6
8
sh
9
"'4
10
131
14

Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 3, Atlanta 2, 11 innings
Los Angeles 2, San Francisco 1
Cincinnati 7, New York 6
Houston 2, Chicago I
St. Louis 3-1, Pittsburgh 0-3
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Atlanta, night.
Los Angeles at San Francisco
New York at Houston, night
Only games scheduled.

"Kubrick provides the viewer with the
closest equivalent to psychedelic experience
this side of hallucinogens.1"~Mzne"A fan-s
Itastic movie about man's future!l An
unprjpcedented psychedelic roller coaster of
an experience ~Magazine Kubrick's '2001' is
the ultimate trip " -ChristaScienca'

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