100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 26, 1968 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, June 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, June 26, 1968 ThE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUIMMERS SON
UEphil1brown
Trinity University used to be a garbage dump.
But then Trinity used to be a lot of things, including
somewhere else.
Now Trinity is a beautiful little school on the north side
of San Antonio, Texas, where its 41 (count 'em) buildings
lie along a ridge known locally as Trinity Hill..
Possibly the only thing that Trinity really needs and
doesn't have is tradition, but that is not about to stop the,
Tigers. You see, Trinity is going to be 100 years old next year,
but the school has been moved so often that traditions have
sort of fallen by the wayside.
However, as you have probably already noticed, there is
something in the works that will soon have good old Trinity
right up there with the big ones tradition-wise.
Terms like "Trinity Hill" and "University in the Sun" are
pouring steadily out of the school's publicity office. Among
others included in a description of the school published re-
cently are "Skyline Campus" (there aren't many hills in San
Antonio) and "Trinity red", which describes the brick used
In all campus buildings.
The lasting touch to Trinity's "instant tradition" program,
however, is Trinity Tower, a
landmark which lends a focal
point to the campus. Every
school has a landmarc, of
course, and it is this which will
no doubt symbolize the school
to its graduates as distinctive-
ly as the Diag symbolizes Mich-
,igan .
It is probably unfair to say .
that Trinity has no tradition,
because any institution has
some sort of heritage, be it
ever so modest. A new campus
takes time to break in, like a
baseball glove or a new car,
so it is not surprising that
Trinity is pushing for recog-
nition as an established school.
If Trinity does have tradi-
tion, as every school must (es-
pecially one a century old), it
is in athletics.
A small school (2500 stu- TRINITY TOWER
dents) Trinity does things in a big way. The Tiger basketball
team finished third in the NCAA college-division tournament
this year, while the Trinity tennis program has few peers.
Tennis is big time for this school, and to prove it Trinity
last week hosted the NCAA tennis championships. Under the
guiding hand of Clarence Mabry, the school's tennis coach,
San Antonio welcomed more than 250 tennis players from 80
colleges.
It was a big week for Trinity, and gave visitors a chance to
see exactly how important tennis is to this school.
Trinity has been a tennis power for quite a while, and
doesn't intend for that to change in the near future. The school
issues between six and ten athletic scholarships for its netters,
and provides superlative facilities for the team's use.
Trinity's tennis stadium was built in the late fifties, a four-
court unit that seats 600 in shaded comfort. But that was not
enough for a school that thrives on the net game, so this year
Trinity went and built another, bigger tennis facility.
Through the generosity of a local real estate developer
(and with the idea of holding the NCAA's in mind) Trinity
last week dedicated the new George W. Delavan Tennis Sta-
dium, the finest collegiate tennis plant in the country.
But, getting back to the subject of campus tradition -
we must accept the fact that for any school to have tradition
it must first make local citizens aware of its presence, and it
is this chore which Trinity faces now.
When I first arrived in San Antonio I sought out the
limousine that would take me to the campus.
"Trinity?" responded the driver. "You know, I've heard of
that place, but I sure don't know where it is."
"It's somewhere over by Alamo Stadium, I think," offered
another driver. "Just turn right on Stadium Boulevard on
the way down St. Mary's. It's over there somewhere."
Sure enough, we found the school without much trouble,
and the driver didn't even mind going out of his way (San
Antonians are notoriously friendly).
"I always knew this place was here," he said. "They had
a pretty good basketball team, didn't they?"
So two of us discovered Trinity University. From now on
I won't be able to look at a list of football or basketball scores
without searching subconsciously for the Tiger score. I'll recall
Trinity Hill and the graceful Trinity Tower.
And there will be pleasant memories of the University in

the Sun.

Ryun
SACREMENTO, Calif. (IP) -
President David A. Matlin of the
Amateur Athletic Union agreed
Thursday, June 20, to sign the
world record application for Jim
Ryun's 2-year-old one-half mile
mark.
Originally, the application for
international approval of' the
1:44.9 time for the mark was turn-
ed down by the International
Amateur Athletic Federation be-
cause Ryun set it in an unsanc-
tioned meet.
Matlin yielded to demands by
the AAU Men's Track and Field1
Committee that Ryun's record
be given approval immediately.
T h e committee Wednesday
night instructed Matlin and Col..

record half

mile
Olympic track coach, as well
others insisted the application
forwarded without sanction.

Donald Hull, executive director
of the AAU, to sign the reappli-
cation. The two refused Thurs-
day morning, saying a sanction
of the meet, held in June, 1966,
in Terre Haute, Ind., would be
necessary.
That meet was sponsored by
the U.S. Track and Field Feder-
ation, which is engaged in a
struggle for the control of ama-
teur track with the AAU.
After the refusal of Matlin and
Hull to sign the application, the
pair was requested to attend a
rmeeting Thursday of the execu-
tive committee of the men's com-
mittee, which is supposedly auto-
nomous in the sport.
At first Matlin and Hull held

out for requiring a sanction of
the Terre Haute meet but execu-
tive committee members Bob
Giegengack, Yale track coach,
and Payton Jordan. Stanford
track coach and head American
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

as
bed

Although no threat by the track
and. field committee to revolt
openly against the :AAU was is-
sued by the executive committee,
such a revolt was a possibility and
was thought to have been the
reason for his change of mind.'
The track and field committee
issued a press release saying Mat-
lin "will certify reapplication for
the record based upon and with
reference to the committee's reso-
lution. Mr. Matlin will arrange
for AAU Secretary Richard E.
Harkins of Kansas City to add his
signature to the reapplication for
the record."s
Matlin and Hull signed the
press release. The action came
on the eve of the AAU's two-day
annual track and field chain-
pionships, at Sacramento's Sta-
dium.
Ryun, the Kansas star whol
holds world records in the mile
and 1,500 meters wasn't on
hand. He suffered monoucleo-

ets A
sis this spring and hasn't re-
turned to active competition.
The rack and field committee,
which includes many college
coaches, declared in its resolu-
tion that it ."does hereby unani-
mously reconfirm its approval of
Jim Ryun's 880-yard world record
and it does further certify
that all necessary requirements
of the IAAF have been met and
does instruct the president and
secretary of the AAU to sign, re-
submit and request approval of
said record by the IAAF and that
this resolution be attached to the
aforementioned application."'
Ryun's mark was originally
submitted to the IAAF after .af-
firmative votes by various AAU
committees.
But the application wasn't
signed by AAU administrative
officials. The mark was, however,
approved as an American ,record.
AAU officials have always
maintained that they'had no rea-
son to doubt the conditions under
which the record was set and that,
indeed, some AAU officials had.
helped conduct the meet in Terre
Haute JIM'

ok

NUMEROUS STOPS:
Course set for Olympic torch

ATHENS (A) - The Olympic
Flame signifying another Olym-
pic year will be lit at the birth-
place of the Games on Aug. 23
and its trip to Mexico City will
coincide with celebrations along
the way marking Christopher
Columbus' discovery of America.
The flame-lighting ceremony
takes place in the presence of
Mexican and Greek Olympic of-
ficials at Olympia in a ritual
dating back to ancient times
before it is relayed to Athens by
runners.
In Athens, a runner will light
a torch on the Acropolis and in
the all-white marble Panthenian
Stadium, site of the first modern
Olympics in 1896.
Then runners will take the
flame to a nearby port where it
will be placed aboard a Greek
navy destroyer for a sea voyagex
USAC ,v.otes
for turbines;
rules a ltered
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. () -
A proposal that would have
excluded turbine-powered cars
from the United States Auto
Club's national championship
racing was rejected yesterday by
USAC directors.
Although the USAC Rules Com-,
mittee recommendation to res-
trict competition to internal com-
bustion reciprocating piston en-
gines was voted down, the direc-
tors did ban the use of four-wheel
drive effective Jan. 1, 1970.
Turbine-powered cars that came
close: to winning the last two
Indianapolis 500-mile races had
four-wheel drive.
The USA board also voted tol
require that, starting with the
1970 season, all gas turbine pow-
er plants eligible for the cham-
pionship circuit be of the auto-
motive type as opposed to indus-
trial or aircraft type engines.

to Genoa, Christopher Columbus'
birthplace.
Italian Olympic officials will.
greet the flame on arrival, Aug.
27, and then take it officially in
hand. A brief tribute is planned
at Columbus' birthplace, where
a flame will be lit.
The following day, the flame
will be placed aboard the Italian
naval training vessel "Americus
Vespucci," which will sail for
the Spanish port of Barcelona.
The Vespucci arrives in Bar-
celona on Aug. 30, where the
Italians relay the Olympic flame
to the Spaniards and another
ceremony is held to mark the
return of Columbus. It was in

Barcelona that Columbus was re-
ceived by the Spanish royals and
rewarded for his discovery of the'
new land.
Following a reception by the
Spanish Olympic Committee on
Aug. 31, the flame, borne by
runners, begins an 11-day over-
land trip to idyllic Puerto de Pa-
los. Then it will be placed aboard
a Spanish naval vessel to follow
the route of Christopher; Colum-
bus when' he set sail aboard his
flagship "Nina."
The Spanish ship will cruise
through the Canary Islands and
drop anchor at San Salvador, as
historybooks relate, the first A-
merican land discovered on the
morning of Oct. 12, 1492.
On Sept. 29, in the presence of
Greek, Italian, Spanish, Baham-
ian and Mexican Olympic offi-
cials, a monument symbolising
the union of the classic cultures
of the Mediterranean with those
of America through the historic
voyage and discovery will be un-
veiled.
The next day, the Mexican
Olympic Committee officially re-
ceives the Olympic Flame and in-
stalls it aboard a Mexican des-
troyer which leaves for Veracruz.
Then on to Mexico City and
the 19th Olympiad.

i--

Three yachts
forced out of
Atlantic race
NEWPORT, R :I ) -Three
yachts competing in the biennial
Newport to Bermuda race dropped
out of the event yesterday due
to broken equipment.
_ The 45-foot sloop Huntress,
owned by Morton H. Engel of
Mamaroneck, N. Y., reported
losing its mast and having a dis-
abled engine.
The craft was reported some
150 miles from Montauk Point
on Long Island, N.Y. and headed
there late yesterday afternoon.
It is listed as having a seven-
man crew in addition to the
skipper.
Also forced out with a broken
mast and returning to Newport
was Magic, a 42-foot sloop owned
by Dr. George Nichols Jr. of
Manchester, Mass.

150 PAIRS

N.

Major League
Standings
NATIONAL LEAGUE

WOMEN'S LOAFERS
Nat. Adv. Brands
Many Styles
Broken Sizes
-/

St. Louis
xSan Francisco
Atlanta
xLos Angeles
Philadelphia
New oYrk
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston
xLate game not1

W L
44 27
38 33
37 33
36 36
32 32
34 35
34 36
32 35
31 39
29 41
Included.

Pet.
.620
.535
.529
.500
.500
.493
.486
.478
.443
.414

GB
6
614
8 1
9
91/2
10
3
141,'~

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 1
-New York 4, Cincinnati 0
Houston 4, Chicago 2
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 2
Los Angeles at San Francisco inc.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Detroit
Cle~veland
Baltimore
Minnesota
xUakland
NewtYork
Boston
xCalifornia
Chicago
Washington

W
46
39
35
36
35
34
33
33
.30

L
26
34
32
33
33
35
34
35
38
41

Pct.
.639
.534
.522
.522
.515
.493
.493
.485
.441
'379

GB
71*
9_
9
10%,~
II
14
is

TV RENTALS
$10 FREE
per month SERVICE &
call DELIVERY

It

$ 500 y" ~ P
CAMPUS STORE ONLY
CAMPUS SHOP
619 E. Liberty 662-0266

xLate game not included,
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 8, New York 5
Baltimore 6, Boston 0
Minnesota at Chicago
Cleveland 6, Washington 2
Oakland at California, inc.

N EJAC TV RENTALS

662-5671

NEED LEVS

I

300 S. STATE
(Corner of Liberty)
discount records, inc. 1235 S. UNIVERSITY
WELCOME BACK, STUDENTS

visit

I

I

Automatic Stick Shift

TO ANN ARBOR'S MOST
CPMPLETE RECORD SHOPS
! Two Campus Locations
* Every L.P. at
Discount Price
* Courteous, Knowledgeable
Clerks
0 All the Latest Singles
0 Extensive Oldies Selection
* Rock, Folk, Classical,
Blues, Shows, Jazz, Fore

SPECIAL L.P. SALE

I

-ARETHA NOW!
(brand-new)
-MASON WILLIAMS
PHONOGRAPH RECORD
-LONGTIME COMING--
Electric Flag
-DAYS OF FUTURE PASSED-
Moody Blues
-SONG TO A SEAGULL-
Joni Mitchell
-RESURRECTION OF PIGBOY
-CRABSHAW-
Paul Butterfield

-BEAT OF THE BRASS-
Tijuana Brass
--WILDFLOWERS-
Judy Collins
-THE DOORS' FIRST ALBUM
-CHILDREN OF THE FUTURE
-Steve Miller Band

Over 5000 pair in stock!

THE LARGEST SELECTION
OF LEVI'S IN THE AREA

we

ere 4.79
NOW3
ONLY ster

I

I

eo

WHITE LEVI'S .............
4 Colors and Pure White
BLUE LEVI'S
Super Slims ..... .. .
Traditional. ....
Button Fly .............
Guaranteed to Shrink!
STA-PREST .........
S-T-R-E-T-C-H.......

THROUGH SATURDAY 6 29

4.98

After Io these many years our humble
little bug has gone automatic.
Gone is the clutch.
Gone is the wifely whine, "It's cute, but
( can't drive it."
Cone isan era of Volkswagendom.Sniff.
And in its place?
A Volkswagen you can drive all over
town without shifting.
Only on the highway do you shift.
Once. (This is an economy move.Which,
after all, is still the name of the game.)
But you do have a choice in the matter.
you can drive it the easy way (described
above). Or you can start out in low and
take it through the gears like a regular
stick shift.
The automatic stick shift is on oaption:

5.50
5.79
5.29
6.98
6.98
8.00

YOU'LL HAVE TO SEE IT
TO BELIEVE IT-

Thousands of L.P.'s, mono
and stereo, for only
AN INCREDIBLE SELECTION
INCLUDING L.P's by

1 98
or less

Our S University Store
Has a GREAT SELECTION of
ROCK
POP
FOLK
AT DISCOUNT PRICES
on 8-TRACK STEREO

NUVO HOPSACK ....
T-Shirt [ CPO
Colors with Shirts
pocket'sI

Arturo Roger Voisin Stan Getz
Toscanini Miles Davis Tom Rush
Pierre Boulez Wes Otis Spann
Helmut Walcha Montgomery B. B. King

Camping
Supplies

.99 and
1,39

6.95 and
1.95

I

I

II '3

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan