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June 14, 1968 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-14

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Friday, June 14, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

i

Friday, June 14, 196a THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

I I , I M W IY IYI

-2nd ANNUAL - I
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I,

LBJ signs
consular
treaty
WASHINGTON (R') - President,
Johnson took the final steps yes-
terday to make a new U.S.-Soviet
consular treaty effective, and used
the occasion to call for continued
cooperation between the two
powers.
"We must work together when-
ever and wherever we can," John-
son said as he signed the diplo-
matic documents in an East Room
ceremony. Soviet Ambassador An-
atoly Dobrynin and Secretary of
State Dean Iusk looked on.
The treaty, which takes effect
in 30 days, provides for eventual
reopening of consulates in the two
countries to aid commerce and
help travel of citizens between
the two countries.
One U.S. aim was to assure that
U.S. officials have access to U S.
citizens who may be detained in
Russia.
Johnson said this country still
has "deep and dangerous differ-
ences on certain issues ,with the
Soviet Union."
But he added: "The peace of
the world is too important to let
these differences prevent us from
exploring every avenue to a more
peaceful relationship and a more
cooperative world."
The' signing came only a day
after Johnson hailed United Na-
tions approval of a treaty to limit
the spread of nuclear weapons-
an action in which the two major
powers were the prime movers.
Dobrynin joined Johnson in ex-
pressing the hope the consular
convention will lead to further co-
operation in many other fields.
The convention is the first bi-
lateral treaty between the two
countries. Originally signed in
Moscow in May 1964, it was not
ratified by the U.S. Senate until
March 1967.

New travel bans
i East Germany
BERLIN ) - East Germany enforced new restrictions
on overland travel to West Berlin yesterday, causing massive
highway, delays and leading West German Chancellor Kurt
Georg Kiesinger to call for a "serious counterreactior" from
the isolated city's U.S., French and British protectors.
Trucks which travel the 110-mile autobahn to West Ger-
many carrying food and other life necessities in and out of
West Berlin, were held up for as much as five hours at border
crossing points where the East Germans put new freight
charges, passport and visa de-?

-Associated Press
SECRETARY OF STATE Dean Rusk and Soviet Ambassador Anatoly, Dobrynin prepare to sign
a new consular treaty between the United States and the Soviet Union yesterday. The treaty pro-
vides for eventual reopening of consulates in the two countries to aid commerce and help travel of
citizens between the two countries.
SEEKS PASSAGE OF BILL:
Ford asks crime veto

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crees into effect for the first
time. Cars dawdled for up to
three hours.
The decrees require that West
Germans and West Berliners
henceforth pick up and pay for
visas as a condition for traveling
to and from West Germany. Pre-
viously, they had been in a dif-
ferent category from foreigners,
required only to show their iden-
tity cards and pay road fees. The
East Germans now demand that,
West Germans obtain passports by
July 15.
Jhey tactic does not constitute a
blockade like that unsuccessfully
imposed by the Soviet Union 20
ycars ago, but it tests West Ber-
liners confidence and the allies'
resolve. It also challenges West
Germany.
Kiesinger, who flew here from
Bonn aboard a 'U.S. Air Force
plane, denounced the East German
action as "illegal, provocative and
against existing agreements." He
said he had called for a "serious
counterreaction" in talks Wednes-
day with the ambassadors of the
United States, Britain and France.
Kiesinger did not elaborate but
his answer indicated that in the
discussions on what to do about
the East German restrictions,
there were differing opinions.
While declining to speculate on
measures that could be taken on
a political level 1concerning the
East Germans travel restrictions,
Kiesinger emphasized that his
government would do everything
in its power to make West Berlin's
economy stronger through subsi-
dies.

WASHINGTON (I)-A congres-
sional Republican leader chal-
lenged President Johnson yester-
day to reject the crime control
bill "so we can re-enact it over
his veto."
"What is he waiting for" asked
Rep. Gerald R. Ford of Michigan,
the House GOP leader.
Johnson left for a weekend at
his Texas ranch without indi-
cating whether he plans to sign
or veto the bill. He has criticized
its gun control provision as a
watered down, halfway' version of
what he asked for.

National news roundup

SAN FRANCISCO - Gov. Nel-
son A. Rockefeller renewed his in-
vitation yesterday to Richard M.
Nixon to debate him on television,
declaring the former Vice Presi-
dent has refused so far because
"he's got a conditioned reaction
to debate."
The New York governor, cam-
paigning to overcome Nixon's lead
in winning Republican National
Convention delegates in their
race for the party's nomination,
told a news conference:
"I'll meet him anywhere, any
time he likes."

NEW YORK - Trading volume
on the New York and American
Stock Exchanges leaped to rec-
ord heights yesterday.
Transactions on the New York
exchange soared to 21.35 million
shares, topping the previous rec-
ord of b0.41 million set last April
10.
* * *
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. - A
Titan 3 rocket yesterday success-
fully sprayed eight jam-resistant
military communications space-
craft into separate orbits to assure
satellites are overhead nearly 100
per cent of the time for speeding
messages between Vietnam and
the Pentagon.
* * *
HOUSTON, Tex. - A 47-year-
old man died yesterday while ,ur-
geons were transplanting the
heart of a sheep into his chest
'as a last resort.'
He was identified by his wife as
Sam Willoughby of Waterloo,
Iowa. The hospital declined to
name him.

There was .no immediate presi-
dential reaction to Ford's demand
that Johnson sign or veto the bill,
but acting Atty. Gen. Warren
Christopher termed it a "crude
and churlish attempt to shift the
blame for delay on this legisla-
tion."
Congress completed action on
the measure last Thursday.
"A whole week has been lost,"
Ford said, adding that FBI sta-
tistics show that more than 70,000
crimes , are -committed- in this
country in average week.
"Some 246 murders, 530 rapes,
3,400 robberies and over 5,000
aggravated assaults have ticked
off the crime clock since Congress
did its duty a week ago today,"
Ford said, again citing FBI crime
reports for an average week.
"What is the President waiting
for?" he asked again.
Ford spoke at a. joint news con-
ference with Sen. Everett M. Dirk-
sen of Illinois, the Senate Repub-
lican leader.
Dirksen referred to riots, rising
crime rates, challenges to author-
ity, and the burning of draft cards
and said: "The law must be obey-
ed and enforced."
He suggested that mandatory
sentences written into the law
"might help to stem the crime
tide."
The crime control bill is an om-
nibus measure that includes re-
strictions on the sale of handguns
but not on rifles and shotguns.
Johnson sent Congress last
Monday a new bill that would
regulate the sale of long guns and
ammunition.
Dirksen, who voted against in-
cluding long guns in the crime
control bill, said of the new bill
that, "If necessary, I'll be de-
lighted to support it." But he said

he wants to hear testimony on the
issue first.
Ford said he thinks the admin-
istration's new bill "may well be
necessary." He said House Repub-
lican leaders have an open mind
on it.
In demanding presidential ac-
tion on the crime control bill,
Ford said its passage 'reflected
the massive demand of an aroused
American that crime must be
stopped."
Christopher said in a statement
that Johnson has until June 19
to act on the measure and he
added "The attempt of the minor-
ity leader Ford to command the
President to abbreviate the con-
stitutional period on this far-
reaching legislation is a presump-
tuous and partisan insult to the
President."

* 40
Hanoi aim
to build
pressuare
PARIS (A')--Communist'con-
ment published here yesterday
indicated that North Vietnam is
trying to pile,.threat upon threat
and pressure to bring about Unit-
ed States surrender to their basic
demand at the Vietnamese peace
talks.
At the same time, the delega-
tion from Hanoi gives the impres-
sion that it is inching slowly to-
ward minor concessions-one an
admission that there are North
Vietnamese troops in South Viet-
nam and the other a willingness
to- consider r'educing the propa-
ganda output of the discussions
here.
American delegation members
-concede that the Hanoi team
seems to have a large amount of
patience, but, as one put it, "So
have !we." The Americans appear
resigned to a long wait while
North Vietnam probes the possi-
bilities of political and military
advantages that might be brought
from tle battleground to the con-
ference table.
The French Communist party
newspaper L'Humanite published
a long dispatch from its special
correspondent in Hanoi reporting
and commenting on a communique
of the Viet Cong's National Liber-
ation ,Front, published /there.
The communique contended
that while the front in the South
"must count first of all on their
own forces," they have the right
"to accept the aid of the com-
patriots of the North in any form
whatever."
The dispatch quotes the com-
munique as saying the front re-
serves the right to receive aid of
all kinds from its friends any-
where, "even in the case of aid
in arms and volunteers."
The Hanoi delegation here has
seemed to be leading up to an ad-
mission, under American prod-
ding, that North 'Vietnam has
troops in the South. The front's
statement could "be a means of
la'ing a foundation for expressing
the North's rights to have the
troops there.
Such /an admission would not
advance the peace talks much
beyond the present deadlock. But
it would be a slight measure of
progress.

r

12,000 troops hunt
Saigon bombing sites

SAIGON (P) - More than 12,000
U.S. and South Vietnamese troops
fanned out around Saigon yester-
day in a top priority effort to find
enemy rocket nests and stop the
rocket attacks that have spread
death and destruction among the
capital's three million people.
Faced with enemy threats of
new ground attacks and 100-round
barrages of the' whining, whoosn-
ing rockets, Saigon's fearful resi-
dents put more tape on their win-
dow panes, bought sandbags for
barricades and settled down for
another nervous night of waiting.
Twenty-five battalions of allied
troops were deployed to sweep
Saigon's defensive ring in what
U.S. officials termed "a priority
effort" to combat the rockets that
terrorize the population in a cam-
paign similar to that of the Ger-
man buzz bombs in World War II.
Troops of the U.S. 1st Infantry
Division yesterday afternoon
found and destroyed 22 rounds of
107mm rocket shells six miles east-
northeast of Saigon.
Units of the U.S. 25th Infantry
Division, moving into an area five
miles northwest of the capital,
found a launching site apparently
used in Wednesday's attack
against Tan Son Nhut airbase on
the city's western edge. The in-
fantrymen found 17 patches of
charred ground, apparently caused
by the blast of rockets, and seized
14 homemade launching tripods,
12 aiming stakes and one 122mm
rocket warhead.
One U.S. official said the allies
have 'good dope on the infiltra-
tion routes" used to move the

bardments.

,A

England may speed
Ray return to U.S.

122mm rockets within their seven-
mile range of Saigon adding: "I
feel we can cut this down even
more but we can't stop it com-
pletely."
The enemy's Liberation Radio
broadcast warnings of a massive
shelling of 100 rockets a night
that would begin Monday and
last for 100 days. It told Saigon
residents to flee the city.
Senior U.S. officials expressed
doubt that the Viet Cong was ca-
pable of carrying out the rocket
threat but said the enemy might
be able to mount at least one of
the spectacular, 100-round bom-

Don't Miss The Last One!I
1968 Dinner-Film Series,
FRIDAY, JUNE 14
"FAIL SAFE"q~
(the point of no return)
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER, 1432 Washtenaw
Dinner at 6:00 P.M.
Coffee and Informal Discussion Follow the Film

LONDON (R)-British charges)
against James Earl Ray, accused
assassin of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr., may be dropped to speed
his return to the United States,
court sources said yesterday.
The American case to extra-
dite Ray is expected to be heard
in court here next week, possibly
Tuesday.
The British government set the
stage for the hearing when the
Home Office -authorized Chief
Magistrate Frank Miltonr of the
Bow Street Court to study the
American case against Ray and
begin proceedings.
It was Milton who heard the
two British charges against Ray

Reservations needed:

662-5529 or 662-3580

-carrying a forged passport and
a loaded gun-at Bow Street Mon-
day. At the time he ordered Ray
to appear in court again next
Tuesday on th'ese charges.
But the sources said the court
may, drop the British charges
and instead begin hearings on the
U.S. extradiction petition.
In any case, the sources said,
Milton is expected to open the
extradition proceedings within a
week.
Ray, 40, was arrested Saturday
while trying to catch a plane to
Brussels. He carried a false Can-
adian passport in the name, of
Ramon George Sneyd, the name
he is held under in London's
Wandsworth Prison with a round-
the-clock police guard in the same
cell.
The inch-thick extradition pe-
tition contains fingerprints and
other evidents to support the
American claim that Sneyd is
Ray, the man indicted in Tennes-
see for the April 4 slaying of
King.
American and British officials,
Ray's court appointed lawyer and
Scotland Yard all refused com-
ment on the case.
The possibilities of appeals and
other legal moves could delay his
extradiction by six weeks.
Fred M. Vinson Jr., assistant
U.S. attorney general who is head-
ing the American legal team here,
was reported plapning to return
to the United States in the next
few days, now that the extradition
petition. is in the court's hands.

I

SUNDAY NIGHT FILM SERIES
Sun., June 16, 9 P.M., Canterbury House
"A WEAPON CALLED MEMORY"
program of tape and film-an attempt to bring an early film, whose
social meaning was distorted and forgotten, to bear on the present:
THE CABINET OF
DR. CALIGARI
silent film (1919), introduced by
THE PRAGMATIC WARRIORS
tape montage by Jeremy Lustig, re-edited by Randall Jacob
(tape is 1st part of program, film 2nd part)

I

SUNDAY AFTERNQON
3 P.M.. MiiltizrnvveRoom''

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