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June 12, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday, .tune 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, June 12, 1 9 6 8 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

t,

East Germany announces
Berlin travel restrictions
BERLIN ()P-East Germany an- The United States, Britain and of the recent passing of what they
nounced yesterday sweeping re- France protested the restrictions labelled aggressive national state
strictions on travel by West Ger- on grounds travel rights must be of emergency laws in West Ger
mans in a drastic move fore- decided under the', four-power many.
shadowing a new Berlin crisis, agreements and that the Soviet The East Germans also an
A top U.S. official called the Union, not East Germany, is the nounced complicated taxes o
measures intolerable and West responsible authority. freight and transport mileag
Berlin's mayor labeled the move The three Western allies, in through East Germany and raise
"a black day for all Germans." identical letters to the Soviet am- transit fees for those travelin
In an apparent bid to achieve a bassador to East Germany, called land routes to and from West Ber
large degree of sovereignty, the for the Soviet Union's "urgent lin.
East German Communist regime attention" to the need for re- SERIOUS SITUATION
said it will require West Germans storation of free access to Berlin. In Bonn, Eugene Rostow, U.Q
for the first time to have pass- PASSPORTS REQUIRED undersecretary of state for polit
Sports. and visas for travel to West ia fardcae h rv
Berlin, encircled by tommunist Foreigners now are required to rit irs ,declared the trav
have passports and East Germanretiiosae"in tob
territory. serious situation . . . such a chang
There was no mention of offi- visas to travel between West Ger- from the present pattern can't b
cial Allied travel through East many and West Berlin.ntolerated.
Interior Minister Col. Gen. toeae.
Germany which is controlled by Friedrich Dickel said West Ber- In Vienna, West German Vic
the Russians. liers could travel to West Chancellor Willy Brandt urged th
________could_,traveltoWest Ger-Western Allies to "make it lea

House

defeats

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et
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ar

gun control bill
Committee vote deadlocked;
Celler predicts later aproval
WASHINGTON (P-President Johnson's bid for a tougher
gun control law was defeated yesterday in the House Judici-
ary Committee by a tie vote but Chairman Emanuel Celler,
(D-N.Y.) held out hope for a favorable vote next week.
The committee deadlocked 16-16 on Celler's motion to re-
port immediately the bill submitted by the administration
Monday.
The measure, introduced in the House by Celler and in
the Senate by Sen. Thomas J. Dodd, (D-Conn.), would for-
bid mail order sales of rifles and shotguns as well as hand-
guns.- .,

-Associated Press

I guns.

40

-

CIS
&IIIL

many and to East Germany Dy
obtaining "an annex" to their
present West Berlin identity cards
and that there would be no
change in theprocedure forWest
Berlin citizens traveling into East
Berlin.
The East Germans said the new
regulations were necessary because
of neo-Nazism and revenge-seek-
ing in West Germany and because
MISTERS .
FAMILY RESTAURANT
" HAMBURGERS TR=R£ C=
*CHICKEN CU1CMN
. CONEY ISLANDS
* JUMBOYS
SMILING C
SPEEDY SERVICE

beyond doubt" that they will pro-I
tect free access to West Berlin.
Brandt said East Germany's an-
nouncement "must be taken very!
seriously."
If the West Germans and the
West Germans and the West Ber-
liners agreed to everything order-
ed by the East Germans, masses
of paperwork and long delays in M
already complcated transit would WeE
be inevitable since travel by Ger- of 1
mans makes up well aver 90 per yest
cent of traffic to and from West for1
Berlin. W
East Germany in April an- diti
nounced restrictions on the use men
of land routes between West Ger- U.S
many and West Berlin by West fron
German officials. The Soviet T
Union endorsed the restrictions eve
as being within the jurisdiction of its
East Germany. sibl

Soldiers battle in SaigonL

. ..as Napoleon's Ill's
Empress of Mexico in
JUAREZ
Friday & Saturday-7:00 & 9:05
75c-Architceture Aud.

CARRY-OUT SPECIALISTS
NO WAITING - PLENTY
of PARKING
INSIDE SEATING OR
EAT IN YOUR CAR
OPEN 11 AM DAILY
0662-0022...<.,
3325 WASHTENAW RD.
ANN ARBOR
2 BLKS. W of ARBORLAND

I.

'.SUPERIOR entertainment-warm
laughter even more enjoyable!"
LUCILLE BALLif4

Vietnam buildup urged
By The Associated Press South Vietnam can bear a greater cle around Saigon seven miles out,
[ANILA - Gen. William C. load of the fighting." the maximum range of the big
tmoreland, former commander In Saigon the Viet Cong switch- Russian rockets.
U.S. forces in Vietnam, urged ed to daytime bombardment yes- Instead, the U.S. command says
erday more American troops terday slamming some 30 big sallied troops constantly patrol th
the Vietnam war. rockets into the heart of the city outskirts of Saigon and observa
Vestmoreland called for an ad- during the morning rush hour. tion planes and armed helicopter
onal troop buildup of 15,000 The barrage killed at least 19 patrol the area 24 hours a day.
ato support the present 535,000 Vietnamese civilians and woundedp
fighting men now oh the war 106. u i.
it. It was the heaviest casualty toll Paris m eeting
he four-star general, said how- -and the first major daytime
r, the United States can reduce bombardment- since the Viet
level of commitments, pos- Cong began almost daily shelling reconvenes -
.y in troops in 18 months "if of the capital 34 days ago. The
barrages have killed at least 128 PARIS .,P)-The possibility of
persons and wounded 519. , new moves by the United States
DIAL 5-6290 Tpero andounded 51. xand North Vietnam focused at-
The six-foot 122mm rockets ex- tention on the deadlocked Paris
ploded in the vicinity of major peace talks as negotiators pre-
Sbuildings but did lit-pared to go back to the conferenc
nth and wisdom make the tle damage to most of them. How- table after back to renc.
tabl afer ~sixday recess.
-Life Magazine ever, one landed on the roof of
the government communications The meeting today will be the
1VY f\A 1headquarters and knocked out eighth between U.S. Ambassadox
most telecommunications abroad. W. Averell Harriman and hiy
including lines leased by a num- North Vietnamese counterpart:
ber of American firms . Xuan Thuy, since the talks open-
The rockets were fired from a ed May 13
rice paddy area about six miles While no one on either side here
east of the center of the capital. expects any major breakthrougl
Counter artillery fire was directed for some time, perhaps months;
at the area, and just after the Western diplomats expect occa-
COLOR barrage troops of the U.S. 11th sional tactical maneuvers by
. byDuArmored'Cavalry Regiment swept Hanoi and Washington.
by D~uxethe area.
The Viet Cong apparently have
rk in "MADIGAN" rocket units on all sides of Sai- ap an c
-A U.S. spokesman said it would
take at least fourrdivisionsiof
rP~ar"OCN. -FRI. troops to throw a protective cir-
/ .-n:n b c w F . . .r - .-'

.e
Ir

Rep. William M. McCulloch,
(R-Ohio), voted against immedi-
ate action but made a motion to
reconsider the vote. It was agreed
the committee would vote again
June 20.
Celler said he expected a com-
promise version of the legislation
would be approved at that time.
At the White House, President
Johnson called on the committee
to reconsider promptly what he
called "this shocking blow to the
safety of every citizen in this
country."
Johnson said the deadlock" is a
bitter disappointment to all Amer-
icans and to the President. There
is no excuse whatsoever for fail-
ure to act to prohibit the inter-
,tate mail order sale of rifles."
A ban. on mail order sale of
pistols was included in a broad
crime control bill which Congress
sent to President 'Johnson last
week. The House completed ac-
tion on that bill following the
fatal shooting f Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy.
Following the Kennedy assassi-
nation, the National Council for a
Responsible Firearms Policy has
pushed for tight federal gun con-
trol legislation.
James V. Bennett, former direc-
tor of the Federal Bureau of Pris-
ons and president of the associa-
tion said he would prefer a law.
as tight as that in Japan where
he said all firearms, whether long
guns or pistols, are denied to any-
one except law enforcement offic-
ials and a ivery few other closely
screened individuals.

~I

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor

EXCLUSIVE SHOWING
WED.-SAT.-SUN.
1:10-3:50-6:30-9:10
OTHER DAYS
7:00 and 9:18

UN passes-
.ban on
weapons
UNITED NATIONS ( R)-The
treaty to prevent the spread of
nuclear weapons won overwhel-
ming approval in the United Na-
tions yesterday, but more nations
abstained on the vote than ex-
pected.
The vote in the General As-
sembly's main political committee
was 92 for the resolution, four
against it, 22 abstaining and four
absent. Delegates had expected
between 100 and 105 U.N. mem-
bers to vote for the treaty.
The committee adopted a 48-
nation resolution commending the
treaty and asking that it be open-
ed for signature and ratification
as soon as possible. The assembly
will give the resolution final ap-
proval later this week, Winding up
the session.
Of the ,five nuclear powers, the
Soviet Union, the United States
and Britain cosponsored the reso-
lution and voted for it. France
abstained, and Communist China,
which is not a member of the
United Nations, called the treaty
a Soviet-U.S. plot against rev-
olutionary peoples.
Nuclear powers signing the
treaty pledge not to transfer nu-
clear weapons to countries that
don't have them,. while countries
without nuclear weapons pledge
not to acquire them.
DISARMAMENT
The nuclear powers signing also
pledge to seek nuclear disarma-
ment, spare other countries from
nuclear attack and share .with
them the peaceful benefits of nu-
clear energy.
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg told the committee it
was "a historic vote" and "a good
augury for a more peaceful
world." He said the treaty was
"one of the most momentous in-
ternational agreements ever pre-
sented in the United Nations."
? But Tanzanian Ambassador
Akili B. C. Danieli said it would
only "malie the nuclear club more
exclusive." He accused the big
powers of using "blackmail and
threat" to get it accepted.
BIG POWERS
Foreign Minister Chen Yi of
Red China declared that the
treaty resolution was adopted "un-
der the manipulation of the big
powers."
The treaty names the Soviet
Union, the United States and
Britain to receive signatures and
ratifications. It is to take effect
when ratified by those three and
40 other signers.

cO..sYAN JOHNSON
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
FRIDAY: Richard Widmar

met urg1es1
'gelocation

I

1

H ELD FOXE
OVER F1
3RD WEEK 375
NOTICE!
CONTIN

OVAL GENERAI. CORF
EASTERN THeATReSI

D. VILL GE
5No. MAPLE RD.-'769.1300

SAT.-SUN.
2:25-4:10
7 :00-9:25

I

I %-,/ 0 k_/ 0 -W-F ww -M

STARTING JUNE 15th
4UOUS SHOWINGS DAILY

Carefree
Parking

Inside We Make Our
Comfort Own Weather

Program Information 2-6264
IFISTFUL OF
DOLLARS"
plus
"FOR A FEW
DOLLARS MORE"
~~-Starts TO MO RROW!
London
isforthebirds"
andthe loveliest
birdso!all
toHerman
andhis
Goldwyn '
C v
Alt Nt Ti

EVERY DAY FOR THE SUMMER
"PLANET OF THE APES' IS A
BLOCKBUSTER. FASCINATING If
-Uz Smith, Cosmopolitan
20TH CENTURY-FOX PRESENTS
CHARITON HESTON
in an ARTHUR P. JACOBS production
DLAN
RODDY McDOWALL- MAURICE EVANS
- fJ IM HUNTER JAMES WHITMORE JAMES DALY
UNDA HARRISON APAC PRODUCTIONS- MORTABRAHAMS FRANKLIN J SCHAFFNER
C Ar WiSL N R(} N G It a f OONotsl .E .o. AviCE
IQA[ WLSN OOSERUNG aE~ c t Ira soui [ PANAYISI Otr -COLORBY DELUXE

SUNDAY AFTERNOON
3 P.M., Multipurpose Room
Undergraduate Library
METROPOLIS
Fritz Lang-Theau von Harbou
(1927)
film version of class conflict
in the, future city,
distorted by "ornamental"
style and misunderstanding
of ideas.
Sponsored by Voice Film Series
Free-donation requested

TOKYO (K')-The presence of
American troops in Japan was
further criticized yesterday by
a special committee of Japanese
cabinet members who urged the
United States to relocate an air
base.
In addition the Tokyo city
council demanded a ban on visits
by nuclear warships, and student
demonstrators blocked a gunpow-
der shipment.
Sentiment against American
bases in Japan increased marked-
ly this month after an American

I

jet based at. Itazuke Air Base
crashed on the Kyushu University
campus.
Despite a U.S. promise to cur-
tail night flights, the cabinet
committee recommended that
Prime Minister Eisaku Sato ask
the United States to move the air
base to another site.
Chief Cabinet Secretary To-
shio Kimura said even if the full
cabinet agrees, no formal request
will be made to U.S. authorities
until a number of alternate loca-
tions can be offered.
The U.S. Embassy declined to
comment until a formal request is
made by Sato.
Sources said the Japanese are
considering asking the United
States to share the Japanese air
bases, at Tsuiki or'Miyazaki, which
like Itazuke are on Kyushu, Ja-
pan's southern island.
At Kitakyushu about 100 leftist
students charged into a railway
station and snake-danced on its
track to prevent the arrival of
1,800 tons of gunpowder for the
U.S. ammunition depot on the
city's outskirts.

T

TONIGHT at
A HOOT

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

An evening of endless musical
Come, do your thing and 'or
long.

variety.
sing-a-

I

Alogldmwmm

r

AFTER "A MAN ANd A WOMAN;'
TE NEW lOVE STORY by ClAUdE [EIOUCb

THURSDAY
ASHOK TALWAR
singing Indian classical and folk music,
accompanying himself on the Tampoura.
--==--======= ==*-==

U

jia_

STARTS TOMORROW-7:00 & 9:00
IF YOU THINK YOU'RE OLD ENOUGH.

I

I

COPEFOR SHERIFF
HELP RESTORE PRIDE
IN THE SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Please make your check payable to Copi for Sheriff
and send it to R. Sauve, Treasurer, 1315 Cam-
bridge, Ann Arbor.

Ann Arbor Dance Theater
Summer Activities
STUDIO CLASS
Dancers will participate in weekly hour long sessions ,
of composition. No previous experience in dancp com-
position or advanced techniques is necessary.
Wednesdays, beginning June 12, 2:00-3:00
at the Jones School-No Fee
NOTE: Babysitter will be hired for mothers attending

'sAlber L Finney~
ChalieBubbSes
"A Memonali Ene~prises Prdaciton . A Reg~onal Fim Release . TechnKcOWc'

YVES MONIANd
/-All f-.r- krnir ni n nr. nn Al

i~~i1 ~*!~

-IFT V

i

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