100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, Ma,

Ch1amberlain will quit
if Meuienot pickied

Pag Si TH MIHIGN DILYThusda1 M

PHILADELPHIA (P) - Wilt
Chamberlain says he won't play
for the Philadelphia 76ers next
season if Frank McGuire or
someone comparable doesn't get
the National Basketball Associa-
tion club's vacant coaching job.I
Does Chamberlain, the 7'1"
superstar want to be a player-
coach?
"Rather than have some stum-
blebum on the bench," he told
basketball writer George Kiseda ofI
the Philadelphia Bulletin, Tuesday
night, "I would consider coaching.
I think no one knows player Wilt
better than Wilt."
NO ONE ELSE
He was asked if it was fair to
say he will not play for the 76ers
in the event they select a bench
coach of someone less than Mc-
Guire's stature.
"That's fair," he said. "If it
isn't McGuire, that's the way it
seems. Right now I can't think of
anyone else."
At no time did Chamberlain say
he wanted the job of player-coach.

"I, Wilt Chamberlain, will first
have to find out where I am,"
he said. "I'm going to talk with
Mr. Kosloff (76ers owner, Ir vKos-
1off) and, see where I stand. I
would like to talk contract with
him as soon as possible, with the
whole thing involved. I would hope
he would confide in me about the
coach. Who coaches is of some im-
portance."
HANNUM RESIGNS
It was ,learned that the 76ers
have offered the job vacated Mon-
day by Alex Hannum to McGuire,
who has a long term contract at
the University of South Carolina.
The 76ers aren't commenting on,
the report.
McGuire has rejected offers, to
return to the East; he coached
the Philadelphia Warriors of the
NBA in 1961-62.
Chamberlain was on that team
which lost the Eastern final play-
offs in the last seconds of a sev-
enth game against the Boston
Celtics. The Warriors were sold
and moved to San Francisco and,

Twins
By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Willie Horton's
sacrif ice fly drove in Dick Mc-
Auliffe with the winning run last
night and the Detroit Tigers de-
feated the Minnesota Twins 3-2.4
McAuliffe had tripled with one
out and after Al Kaline walked,
Horton flied to Rich Reese and'
McAuliffe beat the throw to the
plate.
Denny McLain earned the vic-
tory with a six-hitter, besting
Minnesota's Jim Merritt, who al-
lowed five hits.,
One of the hits off Merritt was
a two-run homer by Jim North-
rup that gave the Tigers a 2-1
lead in the fifth.
Harmon Killebrew's sixth home
run of the year had given the
Twins the early edge. After North-
rup's shot, Reese tied it for Min-
nesota with his first homer of the
year in the seventh.
BOSTON-Roger Repoz' ninth-!
inning single drove in two runs
last night as California beat Bos-
ton 5-3 and ran its winning streak
to four straight games. The Red
Sox have lost four in a row.
Bobby Knoop led off the ninth
with a single and moved to sec-
ond when Red Sox reliever John
'Wyatt fielded a smash by Paul
Schaal, but threw wildly to sec-
ond.
Knoop and Schaal then worked
a doubledsteal ndbRepoz' single
to right drove in both runners.
The Red Sox, held to one un-
earned run by Angel starter
Ricky Clark for seven innings.
rallied to tie it 3-3 in the eighth
on Ken Harrelson's bases-loaded
single off reliever Jack Hamilton.
Right-hander Hamilton was
making his first appearance in
Fenway Park since his errant

Uccumi
pitch beaned Tony Conigliaro last!
Aug. 18, apparently ending the,
slugging young Red Sox outfield-
er's career.1
Hamilton was greeted by a
chorus of boos, then Harrelson
drilled his first pitch to left field
to score Joe Foy and Carl Yas-
trzemski with the tying runs. He
was the winning pitcher, though.
* 4
CLEVELAND - Sam McDow-
ell struck out 16 Oakland batters
last night and Cleveland rallied'
for a 3-1 victory after John Odom
had retired the first 15 batters
he faced.
McDowell's single in the sixth
inning tied the score and the In-
dians scored two more in the sev-
enth.
The Indians' big left-hander
retired 20 men'4n a row after the
Athletics' scored an unearned run
in the third to take a 1-0 lead.
Odom stopped the Indians in
the first five innings, allowing no
hits and only two balls out of the
infield. Then Chico Salmon singled
in the sixth, stole second and
scored on McDowell's single to
center.
Cleveland added two more in
the seventh. Tony Horton and
Duke Sims singled and Horton
scored on the passed ball. Sims
then scored on Salmon's second
single.
Oakland's run in the third came
on Reggie Jackson's triple and a
fly to Jose Cardenal. Jackson
tried to score after the catch and
was safe when catcher Duke Sims
dropped the throw from Cardenal
for an error.
McDowell's previous strike out
high for a nine-inning game was
15 against Detroit in 1965. He
fanned 16 in a ten-inning game
against Baltimore the same year.

to

McLain,

PITTSBURGH - Al McBean
hurled his fourth victory, a six-
hitter, and Donn C 1e n d e n o n
cracked a run-scoring single and
home run last night as the Pitts-
burgh Pirates downed the Chicago
Cubs 4-0 in a game protested by
Cub Manager Leo Durocher.
McBean overcame some early
shakiness in going the distance
for the fourth time.
The Pirates got a run in the
first inning when Roberto Cle-
mente tripled off the right field
wall with two away and scored on
a single by Clendenon.
Cub starter Rich Nye gave up
two harmless hits in the second
inning, then put the Bucs down
in order until Clendenon opened
the seventh inning by clubbing a
towering home run over the left-
field wall, his second of the sea-
son. Manny Mota doubled in two
runs in the ninth.
McBean gave up five hits and
walked two batters in the first
three innings then kept the Cubs
hitless the rest of the way.

Tigers

,

ALEX HANNUM
McGuire refused to go along.
Kiseda's interview with Cham-
berlain was by telephone to Los,
Angeles where the giant center
and other members of the Cham-
berlain family are at the bedside
of Wilt's ailing father.

WILLIE HORTON DICK McAULIFFE

WEd UNS

SQUARE SERIES:
North Stars blitz Blues, 5-1

ST. PAUL-MINNEAPOLIS (R )-
Bill Goldsworthy scored two goals
and added an assist before a Me-
tropolitan Sports Center crowd of
15,172 as Minnesota belted St.
Louis 5-1 last night. The victory
enabled the North Stars to tie the
National Hockey League West Di-
vision on final playoff series.
With each team now owning
three victories in the best-of-7
series, the North Stars and Blues
return to St. Louis Friday night.
The winner will meet the Mon-

treal Canadiens in the NHL Stan-
ley Cup championship series open-
ing Sunday afternoon.
Goldsworthy caped his evening
by setting up Milan Marcetta with
the North Stars' fifth goal mid-
way through the third period.
Marcetta tapped in his own re-
bound as Minnesota rushed Blues'
reserve goalie Seth Martin.
The issue was settled in the first
period when the Stars scored
twice. St. Louis never got closer
than a two-goal deficit after that.

k

..k::

By The Associated Press
Based on 30 at bats.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Player Club G AB R H Pet.
Alvis, CIe 17 60 5 22 .367
Carew, Min 17 66 10 24 .364
White, NY 16 43 7 15 .342
F. Howard, Was 18 65 8 22 .338
Allison, Min 17 60 7 20 .333
Freehan, eDt 17 62 9 20- .323
Unser, Was 18 76 10 24 .316
Andrews, Bsn 16 54 10 17 .315
R. Jackson, Oak 18 68 13 21 .302
Uhlaender, Min 17 65 8 20 .308
Home Runs
Repoz, California, 6; Sims, Cleve-
land, 5; Killebrew, Minnesota, 5;
7 tied with 4.
Runs Batted In
Killebrew, Minnesota, 14; F. How-
ard, Washington, 13; Webster, Oak-
land, 12; Reichardt, California, 12;
Oliva, Minnesota, 12; Uhlaender,
Minnesota, 12; T. Horton, Cleveland,
i .
Pitching
2 Decisions
Hardin, Baltimore, 3-0, 1.000; San-
tiago, Boston, 2-0, 1.000; McLain,
Detroit, 2-0, 1.000; Warden, Detroit,
3-0, 1.000; Lindblad, Oakland, 2-0,
1.000.

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Player Club G AB R H Pct.

Minnesota took a 4-1 lead into
the final period, thanks to a pair
of second-period goals by Gold-
sworthy from in front of the cage.
First, Goldsworthy tapped in a
short pass from Marcetta. That
was the third goal off veteran
Glenn Hall and Blues' Coach Scot-
ty Bowman promptly replaced
Hall with Martin.
Goldsworthy got his second with
less than three minutes to go in
the second when he poked the
puck under Martin after it stopped
right in front of the cage.
St. Louis broke through on Ce-
sare Maniago at 13:53 of the sec-
ond period to momentarily cut
Minnesota's lead to two goals.
Gary Sabourin slapped in a re-
bound.
The North Stars grabbed a 2-0
lead in the first period on a pair
of long shots by Wayne Connelly
and Andre Boudrias, which eluded
Hall.

Rose, Cin
Flood, StL
Kessinger, Chi
H. Aaron, AtI
Valdespino, AtI
Grote, NY
M. Alou,IPgh
T. Aaron, Ati
Riatt, SF
Hart, SF

17
18
18
18
14
16,
11
9
12
17

71
75
70
68
45
48
30
30
36
61

14
17
13
7
4
3
1
3
10

29
30
26
25
15
16
10
10
12
20

.408
.400
.371
.368
.33
.333
.333
.333
.333
.328

Ex-NHL great Adams
struck by fatal attack

41

Home Runs
Swoboda, New York, 7; H. Aaron,
Atlanta, 6; Santo, Chicago, 4; Perez,
Cincinnati, 4; F. Alou, Atlanta, 4;
Cepeda, St. Louis, 4; Shannon, St.
Louis, 4; Hart,San Francisco, 4.
Runs Batted In
Perez, Cincinnati, 17; B. Williams,
Chicago, 16; Swoboda, New York,
16; Cepeda, St. Louis, 15; Flood, St.
Louis, 14.
Pitching -
2 Decisions
Regan, Chicago, 2-0, 1.000; Ma-
loney, Cincinnati, 2-0, 1.000; Koos-
man, New York, 4-0, 1.000; Briles,
St. Louis, 4-0, 1.000; Carbpon, St.
Louis, 2-0, 1.000; Hoerner, St. Louis,
2-0, 1.000; Washburn, St. Louis, 3-0,
1.000.

'MEN'S
OR
4 WOMEN'S
$1500 to $190
VAN BOVEN SHOES
17 Nickels Arcade

Eat or Live in a
CO-OP

Room and
Board
-$21.00
per week
plus afew I
since we oa
our own
WOMEN
Lester, 900 Oakland
Mark VIII1, 917 S. Forest
Osterweil, 388 E. Jefferson
Stevens, 816 S. Forest
Vail, 602 Lawrence

he
w

Board Only'
$13.00
per week
ours work,
n and run
houses
MEN
Michigan, 315 N. State
Nakamura 807 S. State
Owen 1017 Oakland
Pickerill 923 S. Forest

DETROIT WP-Jack Adams, who
discovered Detroit Red Wings
superstar Gordie Howe and had
his name inscribed on hockey's
Stanley Cup as a player, coach
and general manager, died yester-
day of a heart attack. He was 73.
Adams was stricken in his De-
troit office. He had been president
of the Central Professional Hockey
League, which he helped found in
1963.
"I felt sick when I heard the
news about Jack Adams' death,"
said Howe, 22 year veteran of the
National Hockey League who holds
virtually every scoring and longe-
vity record.
"Mr. Adams was like a father to
me. When I joined the Red Wings
organization I was only 16 years
old, and he looked after me as
though I was his own son."
DEDICATION
"Mr. Adams had more love and
dedication for hockey than any
man I ever knew," Howe added.
"He helped me tremendously in
every phase of my career. There
are not enough men of his caliber
in this world . .. and it's a great
loss when one so great as Mr.
Adams passes on."
Adams was coach and general
manager of the Red Wings fromk
1927 to 1962, when he retired. In
that time, his teams won 12 NHL
titles, including a record seven in
a row from 1949 to 1955, and seven
Stanley Cups.'
"This is a great personal loss
for me," said Sid Abel, coach and
general manager of the Red
Wings.
VETERAN
i "Everything I have ever done
in hockey has been with Mr.'
Adams. I played for him-and I
followed in his footsteps as gen-
eral manager."
Adams is survived by his widow,
Helen. They had no children.
Adams played eight years in the
NHL with Toronto, Vancouver and

The Red Wings won their first Connelly slapped a 40-foot shot
league title in 1934 and their first at Hall at 5:28. The puck took a
Stanley Cup in 1935. crazy bounce right under Hall's
Funeral services will be held outstretched legs and into the
Saturday morning in Detroit. cage.

Ottawa, retiring in 1926. When
Detroit got an NHL franchise in
1927, the late Frank Calder, then
president of the league, recom-
mended Adams for the job.. as
coach and general manager.

Open tennis sqi
pre-Wimbledon
By The Associated Press
LONDON-The first signs of a
rift between professional afnd
amateur tennis threatened today
to halt the progress of open tour-
nampents.
American promoter George Mac-
Call was reported planning to pull
his ten stars out of the Kent
Championships at Beckenham-
one of the open tournaments
scheduled to precede Wimbledon.
He said the prize money offered
was not big enough and started
planning a rival tournament of his
own at Eastbourne.
'Officials of the Kent Champion-
ships reacted angrily and com-
plained to the British Lawn T en-
nis Association. Laurie McCallum,t
organizer of the tournament, said:
"I hope we can still sort out the
situation."
The International Lawn Tennis,
Fedseration sanctioned open tour-
naments a month ago and alloted
four open events to Britain this
year.
A 'HAPPY GO LUCKY'
The first-the British Hard
!Hard Court Championship at
Bournemouth last week-was won
by Ken Rosewall, one of Mac-
Call's professionals.
MacCall said then he was un-
decided whether to enter his
players in the two events imme-
diately before Wimbledon-the

uabble seen in
English match
Kent and the London Champion-
ships at Queen's Club.
McCallum said today MacCall
had now told him his players
would not compete at Backenham
because the prize money was too
low.
There is a first prize of $1,200
In the men's singles and $720 in
the women's.
McCallum said that MacCall's
four women stars-Billie Jean
King and Rosemariy Casals of the
United States, Ann Jones of Brit-
ain and Francoise Durr of France
-had all wanted to play at Beck-
enham, where they have competed
in the past amateurs.
APPLES ARE BETTER
MacCall, who pays his 10 stars
a total of $400,000 a year, report-
edly did some hard bargaining
.with French officials before en-
tering his players for the French
Championships in Paris starting
May 27.
Basil Reay, secretary of the
British Lawn Tennis Asociation,
said a tournament at Eastbourne
would not be offically sanctioned
to run alongside the Kent Cham-
pionships. But MacCall is not an-
swerable to any amateur body and
obviously could defy British of-
ficials and run his own tourna-
ment if he wanted.
MacCall has said his profession-
all will play at Wimbledon.

41

Debs, 909 E. University
Visit a house or contact-

INTER-CO-OPERA
2546 SA B,

TIVE COUNCIL
668-6872

- _ __ -

Buy nice things with the 25% you save on

our used textbooks.

f persistent
nage you
arlay to a

Sometimes it really hurts to spend all those crisp dollar
bills just for textbooks, doesn't it? There are so-o-o-o
many other exciting uses for money. Well, you can have
your cake and eat it, too. Buy good-as-new used textbooks
for all your courses from Follett's. Art, drafting and school
supplies, too. We guarantee that you'll have a lot of your
book budget left for other worthwhile things-some of which
you may find right here at Follett's.
-ne as Un Ul - -- .

NURSING and PUBLIC HEALTH
BOOKS and SUPPLIES
OVERBECK BOOKSTORE
THE MEDICAL BOOKSTORE

4
S

Phone NO 3-9333

1216 S. University

HI

ti

1 r .'

II I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan