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June 05, 1968 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1968-06-05

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Wednesday, June 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Threi

Wednesday, June 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pope Thre

--,W 7

Poor people air charges,
talk with attorney general

WASHINGTON MP) - Demon-
strators from the Poor People's
Campaign got in to see Atty. Gen.
Ramsey Clark yesterday and aired
a long list of complaints about the
quality of justice as they see it.
Returning to the building where
they were locked out the night be-
fore, the marchers found the door
open to 115 of them.
They were led through lines of
police into an auditorium for an
audience with Clark.
The attorney general thought
they wanted to hear his response
to demands made earlier by cam-
paign leaders for action by his

department against discrimination
in jobs, education and housing.
But he was barely launched
into a brief statement when he
was interrupted by Rudolfo Gon-
zalez, leader of the Mexican-
American contingent of the cam-
paign, who said the demonstrators
had come not to listen but to talk.
Clark was permitted to finish
his glowing acount of his depart-
ment's achievements in enforcing
various antidiscrimination laws
was received in absolute silence.
In contrast, Gonzalez was in-
terrupted every few minutes by
enthusiastic bursts of applause as

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he lashed the laws and the de-
partment for what he said was
their failure to achieve equal jus-
tice for racial minorities and the
poor.
NAIVE
Gonzalez called Clark "naive or
blind" if he thinks discrimination
has been ended and said the civil
rights laws and their many
amendments "are not worth the
paper they're written on."
"We want a complete change,
a complete new philosophy of
justice," said Gonzalez.
Other spokesmen for the dem-
onstrators added to the catalogue
of complaints in a session that
lasted for hours-so long that an-
other announced march on the
Office of Economic Opportunity,
was called off for the day.
The admission of the marchers
to the Justice Department was
hailed by march leaders as a vic-
tory. Clark had refused to let in
more than 25 representatives Mon-
day and the offer was rejected
as inadequate.
SONGFEST
Forecasts of the first mass ar-
rests in the Poor People's Cam-
paign fizzled Monday night when
a demonstration turned into a
songfest at the Justice Depart-
ment.
Campaign leaders voiced re-
peated predictions of arrests amid
a rising tone of militancy in the
eight-hourndemonstration that
lasted into thebnight Monday.
Protesters blocked the closed
doors of one building entrance
and marched in the street in front
of police, but no clash came.
Meanwhile, Hosea Williams, the
demonstration field marshall, said
the shantytown population had
shrunk from its peak of 3,000 to
1,750 yesterday after two weeks
of rain.

French borrow
to support franc
10, Millon strikers defy de Gaulle,
decide to maintain general strike
PARIS UP) - The French government borrowed nearly
three quarters'of a billion dQllars from the International
Monetary Fund to bolster the franc yesterday while most of
France's 10 million strikers stayed on strike in defiance of
the Gaullist regime.
With drawing privileges of $1.8 billion, President Charles
de Gaulle's regime withdrew $745 million. to meet part of the
cost of nearly three weeks of industrial paralysis. Meanwhile,
thousands of anti-strike demonstrators marched in Paris',in
support of President Charles ,
de Gaulle.-xTi
Paris was paralyzed at the even-
ing rush hour by a colossal traffic v i en e
jam as motorists made use of
newly available gasoline. Taxis,
buses and subways remained idle..

-Associated Press
Campaigners Gonzalez and Father Groppi address attorney general
MAY AFFECT PEACE TALKS:
Giap says U.S. 'wants to get out'

PARIS (P) - A tough statement
by North Vietnam's top military
leader cast a new cloud over the
preliminary Vietnam peace talks
yesterday.
On the eve of resumption of the
talks, in recess since Friday, Gen.
Vo Nguyen Giap, who negotiated
the removal of French forces in
1954, declared that U.S. rulers had
lost faith in victory and are seek-
ing a way of getting out of Viet-j
nam "with honor."

Communist students
blunt attack on Tito!

BELGRADE (P) - Communist
party student leaders, working in-
side Belgrade University's occu-
pied campus, appeared yesterday
to have blunted an undergraduate
attack on the government of Pres-
ident Tito, - with the help of a
ban on street meetings and pa-
rades.
Informants said the Commun-
ist student cadres regained con-
trol over the student rank and
file by siding with their demands
and joining their charges of po-
lice brutality growing out of two
days of clashes with the authori-
ties.
The clashes marked the first
violent protest in the country
since the Communist takeover
after World War II.
Banners denouncing the police
and proclaiming "Down with Red
Bourgeoisie" still hung from a
balcony on the occupied admins-

tration building of the university,
but no fighting or incidents were
reported yesterday.
The young Communists were
pressing the city's 30,000 students
to talk out complaints with the
government and stop demonstrat-
ing.
Grievance meetings went on in
colleges and university branches,
apparently with government ap-
proval because they did not spill
over into the streets.
Although many of the com-
plaints dealt with the details of
student life, the protest was a
broad based one against this Com-
munist nation, whose people are
the most prpsperous in the Com-
munist world.
The students demanded democ-
ratization of the Communist par-
ty, complaining that it fostered a
rich, new class. They also de-
manded freedom of the press and
abolition of social privileges.
The calls seemed to be for a'
type of reform like that which has
gone on in Czechoslovakia, a na-
tion many Yugoslavs now con-
sider more liberal than their own~.

Giap said the people of Vietnam
are determined to fight on until
the United States gets out.
"The American government dis-
plays the desire to get out of this
war .. . To have peace the Amer-
icans must put an end to their
aggression and withdraw their
troops. It is that simple," Giap
said.
Publication of the interview,
given at "the end of May,'' and its
timing left little doubt that it was
aimed at the peace talks,
There had been speculation that
tl-e arrival on the scene of Le
Duc Tho, a high-ranking member
of the ruling Communist politburo
in Hanoi, might mean a shift in
North Vietnam's position.
The Giap statements raised sev-
eral possibilities:.
-Hanoi may be involved in an
elaborate maneuver connected
with the talks.,,
-The statement could mean' a
division of opinion in the Hanoi
Politburo itself on the course of
the war and the price for peace.
-Hanoi may actually believe
that the United States has lost
faith in its military power so far
as South Vietnam is concerned.
Should either the second or
third possibility be the case, these
talks could go on for many
months, beyond the American
presidential elections. Indeed, the
elections seem to figure much in
Hanoi's calculations. Giap indi-
cated this.
"The rulers of the United
States," he said, "wanted to make
the year 1968, the electoral year,
a year of success in Vietnam
which, according to the hopes of
President Johnson, could serve
their internal political ambitions."
Such hopes, he claimed, now
have been dashed by U.S. inabil-
ity to achieve a victory. The im-
plication seems to be that the will
of the United States will be fur-
ther eroded in the six months be-
fore the elections. Perhaps Hanoi~

wants to see the shape of the next
U.S. administration before moving
too far in the talks.
Referring to the "rulers" of the
United States, Giap said that:
since 1967 they had doubted the
power of the Americans to resolve
the problem of South Vietnam by
force, but that now the problem
has become: "How to get out of
this war? How to lose the war?"
He claimed the Americans had
failed in all their objectives: to
exterminate the Viet Cong, to
pacify the countryside, to seal off
the South, to destroy the economic
and military potential of the
Nprth or to "consolidate the pup-
pet government."
As for the air war in the korth,
hsaid, "An air force will never
decide the outcome of a war."

In Lyon, rival groups of stu-
dents battled furiously in the uni-
versity.
The Lyon fighting began when
a group of law students tried to
invade the university which has
been occupied for days by leftist
students opposed to the regime.
The law students wanted to
clear the university in order to
take their year end exams. Boy-
cott of the exams has become a
symbol of left wing students call-'
ing for the overthrow of the re-
gime.r
The situation elsewhere was
largely one of hopeful waiting
while union members consulted
their leaders and voted on ac
ceptance of government-manage-
ment proposals.
A key sector was the railways.
After a Monday night bargaining
session, Transport Minister Jean
Chamant announced an agreement
with union leaders which would
provide for wage hikes of from
12 to 17 per cent.
The Finance Ministry gave a
first, slight indication of the cost
of the strike by announcing the
nations' reserves of gold and for-
eign currenciest slumped $306 mil
.,lion last month to $5,720,500,000.

in Italy

ROME ) - Striking factor3
workers rioted in Lanciano and
new student violence exploded in
Turin yesteda' while armed po-
lice kept, order at the University
of Rome, a scene of turmoil over
the weekend.
In Naples, police with clubs
broke up a march by nearly 200
employes of local schools demand-
ing higher wages.
In Genoa, 1,000 workers and
students marched downtown to
demonstrate solidarity with French
workers and students.
USE GAS
Riot squads used tear, gas to
check the Turin disorders, the
second student outbreak there
since Saturday, and to drive back
the strikers at L anciano, east of
Rome near the Adriatic Sea.
The strikers, members of the
Communist-led General Confed-
eration of Labor, smashed win-
dows in the City Hall and other
buildings, set fire to a postal
truck and battled police with
stones and bricks.
In downtown Turin, industrial
capital of Italy, members of the
"student movement" organizing
nationwide agitation at universi-
ties had raised the red flag of
revolution and the black flag of
anarchy on steps of the main uni-
versity building.
STUDENTS CLASHi
Armed with nail-studded clubs,
the left-wingers clashed with
groups of opposing students-mod-
erates and rightists-who tried to
storm the stairs and rip the flags
away.
At least a dozen students were
reported in jured in a fight with
fists and clubs before the police
arrived to Intervene.
A .handful of students returned
to the University of'. Rome to
resume final examinations under
police protection.
Police summoned by the rector,
Pietro Agostino D'Avack,' forced
their way onto the barricaded
school grounds Monday and clear-
ed. the school of the more than
2,000 rebellious students wo had
occupied it since Friday night.
There was no sign that the stu-
dent- disorders and the strikers'
action in Lanciano and Naples
were directly connected.

"'2001: A Space Odyssey,' a fantastic movie
about ran's futurel An unprecedented psy-
chedelitcroller coaster of an experience that
few viewers are likely to get over!"iaa.
"Kubrick's special effects border on the mi-
raculous-a quantum leap in quality over any
other science fiction film ever made!"~"o A
"In its space-travel special effects it is an un-
paralleled movie spectacle.. put it in a class
of its own!"-Newsd.y "A brilliantly conceived cos-
mic adventure...so spellbinding I immedi-
ately went to see it again!"Mgazne

-Associateo Press
Traffic clogs Paris avenues

------

U

TONIGHT at
A HOOT
Endless string of performersM
Anything can happen and usually does!
Thursday-
Confrontation on the Left
Jerome A. Dupont-a candidate for Democratic
Nomination for Congress. Bert Garskf-o con-
gressional candidate for Citizens for New Politics
Friday and Saturday-
GRADY TUCK (from Calif

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

REMINDER:
Tonight, Wednesday, June 5 at 8 P.M.
6 DAYS IN JUNE
Featuring: Movie, radio program,
readings, Israeli refreshment,'
free discussion.
BRA$LEY LOUNGE at Hillel
1429 Hill Street

,I

I

ornia)

I

singing traditional American Folkmusic
accompanied by banjo, harmonica, guitar (& wife's fiddle)
Fun & work songs since 1800; Ballads, stories and sing-a-longs.
LAST ANN ARBOR APPEARANCE ENROUTE TO EAST

ALL WELCOME

, ____.. t.

I

Ii

READ
BOOKS
Every
Saturday
in

MGMP*SMNtsA STANLEY KUBRICK PRODUCTION
@ 0pig~ r 0*

u

. AW

J

SUPER PANAVISION METROCOLOR

Schedule of Prises and Performances -- Evenings at 8:00 PM. (Sundays of 7:30 PM) Min! Floor
& Mezzanne.$3.00 Balcony $2.50 Matinees Sunday at 2:00 PM. Main Floor & Mezzanine $3.00,
Balcony $2.50. Matinees on Wednesday and Saturday at 2:00 PM, Main Floor & Mez. $2.50,
Balcony $2.00.

"

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I

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