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June 04, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-06-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 4,1968

RAINOUITS CoSTLY:
Diamondmen overcome frustrations, fih in fou

,rth

By ROBIN WRIGHT
"Michigan should have won
the Big Ten baseball title, be-
cause we should have won all theI
conference games," said Michigan
baseball coach Milbry (Moby)
Benedict.
After a weekend of rained out
games, the Michigan ball club
was left in a disappointing fourth
place in the Big Ten with a 9-win
and 5-loss record.
The Wolverines picked up a 5
to 2 win against Central to end
the season with 15 wins and 16
losses overall.
Benedict commented on the re-
sults. "We had some real disap-
pointments this season. This last
weekend with four rained out
games is a prime example.
"We were in a good position to
win against Minnesota Friday.
They were saving their ace pitch-
er to put up 'against Michigan
State on Saturday. We had our
two hottest pitchers-Jack Hurly
and Dave Renkiewicz-ready to

"Two wins against ninth place'
Iowa would have helped us also.
"Another discouraging factor
was poor performances against
Wisconsin and Illinois. Neither
time could we knock the ball,
around enough.
"Against Illinois we made five
errors - more errors than we'd
made in the season so far."
Following an eight-game win-
ning streak, the Wolverines suf
fered key losses in road games
against Wisconsin and North-
western.
After an apparent attempt at
redemption with three consecutive
wins, Michigan was put down in
an error-filled game with Illinois.
Benedict made no, attempt to
account for the final outcome.
"There is no way to explain our
winning and losing streaks. But
I do believe winning is con-
tagious.
"Once the club starts winning
games, it creates an atmosphere
where the team believes in itself
and its ability to win.

"Losing has a tendency to make
a player get down on himself.
Self-pressure and discouragement
combine to damage the player's
attitude.
"Pitching and defense were the
key to our wins. The Michigan
club is not a 14 to 4 type scoring
team.
"As a rule, defense is constant
and reliable, whereas hitting
varies. Even the best hitter can
get into a slump that might last
two weeks. Where does that leave
the team?
daiy
sports.
NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

"We believe pitching is 85 der
cent of the game, and we build
our teams around that phi-
losophy."
The (Wolverines relied heavily
on the arms of Dave 'Renkiewicz
(5-5), Steve Evans (4-4), and
Jack Hurly (3-4) to provide vic-
tory this season.
Despite Benedict's belief in the
defensive side of the game, Mich-
Igan outfielder Elliott Maddox is
one of two contenders for the
Big Ten batting championship
with an overall average of .392.
This is /the second year Mich-
igan has claimed the batting
championship. Last year Andy
Fisher, another outfielder, won
the crown.
Maddox also knocked in 14 runs
to lead the team in RBI's. Before
the last weekend, Maddox also
led the Big Ten in hits, total bases
and doubles. A sophomore, Mad-
dox is 'till eligible for the special
phase draft this spring..
Benedict commented on the
ironies typical of baseball evi-
denced in this year's club. "In the
spring, judging from the re-
turnees, we saw strength in our
hitters, and with the loss of/ Zahn,
and a good, but untested pitching
staff.
"In our pitchers we had three
first year varsity pitchers and a
fellow with only one win last year
-and than was against Cochise
Junior College in Arizona."
A big prble~m on this 'uva'

4

4i

-Daily-James Forsyth
HIGAN FIRST BASEMAN Jim Hosler takes the throw from Bud Forsythe at second to con
a double play against Michigan State. The Spartans fell twice that day; the Wolverines swept
ve straight Big Ten wins, but wound up in fourth place when the defense broke down against

ELLIOTT MADDOX

Illinois. _ go against them.

USAC rules

committee

bans

turbines

batting only .227. Some of the fel-
lows we had counted on had just
average to poor years.
"That is why baseball is unique
as a team sport. Although the
combined effort wins a game, an
individual can make or break it.
"A player is alone when hitting,
catching, etc. and its his sole re-
sponsibility to perform that indi-
vidual function."
As to the final results of the
Michigan team, the fact remains
that Michigan, took two single
games from second place State,
4-1 and 4-2.!

INDIANApOLIS ( )-The rules
committee of the U.S. Auto Club
voted yesterday o ban turbine
engines from USAC racing events.
Final action now is up to the
USAC board of directors. Thomas
Binford, USAC president, said he
might call a meeting of the board
around July 1 to consider the
proposal.
The rules committee recom-
mended that the ban on turbines
take effect Jan. 1, 1969.
Two years ago the rules group
asked that turbine engines be
outlawed but the directors re-
fused to ratify the suggestion.
They sent back a proposal under
which a formula would be drawn
up that would equalize turbine
and pistor engines.,
In 1967, Parnelli Jones' STP
turbine car ran away from the
Indianapolis 500-mile race field
before a bearing 'failure stopped
it with only a few laps remaining.
In last Thursday's 500, two
turbines held the top two starting
positions and driver Joe Leonard
was leading the field with eight
laps to go when his engine conked
out.
Despite yesterday's committee
action, Vince Granatelli, chief
mechanic on the STP turbines,
Inerko qits
1r ,
racing after
owner l0s
SEMINOLE, Ark.-Mad Moun-
tain Tnerko failed for the eighth
straight year.
In a tragic end to a lackluster
career, Tnerko was once again'
beaten by the pigs in the annual
Memorial Day Pig-Down held tra-
ditionally in this picturesque Dixie
hill-town.
He finished a disappointing
17th in a field of 42 sleek, svelte
porkers, just a snout out of 16th
place. -"
" _ This is the tragic end of my
lackluster career,"g Tnerko said
softly after the race. "I can't take
the grind anymore. Not as young
as I used to be either."
' For the last eight years, Tnerko
had captured the fancy of a na-
tion as he valiantly strove again
and again to prove he was, indeed,
better than a pig.
btethnapg"Sad? Sure I'm sad,." he said
at the news conference in Victory
Puddle, immediately following the
treacherous two point three mile
Downer. "But I was beat fair an
square by some faster pigs. That s
all there is. That's all there is to
say. I'm through."
What will Mad Mountain do
how that he's retired from the
hectic world of pig-racing?
"I dunno," he said. "Maybe run
my greens' stand fultime. May-
be write a little. A fellow from
New York offered to help me with
an autobiography. I'll keep busy,
don't worry about that.
"But it won't be the same next
spring," he continued, "not hav-
ing, to train or anything for the
Downer. It just won't be the'
same."
yes, each century has its great
men: its Einsteins, its Ruths, and
its VanArsdalens. But there has'
been only one Tnerko. Perhaps
it's better ghat way.

indicated he thought the direc-
tors would not prevent competi-
tion by turbine cars.
"I can't honestly believe that
the governing body of USAC
would want to ban all types of
engines except the pistons," he
said. "Leaving our turbines out of
it, bearing all other types ofI
power would be taking a step}
backwards and I, personally, can't.
visualize USAC doing this."
The committee recommendationi
was that powerplants for all
USAC events be restricted to in-
terpal combustion, recipocrating#
piston engines.

*

*

*

*

*

*

Gadsby succeeds Abel as Wings' coach

DETROIT (AP) - Bill Gadsby,
named yesterday as coach of the
Detroit Red Wings, served 2514
hours in the penalty box through-
.out his career - second highest
in National Hockey League his-
tory - and says he intends to
require that kind of play from
the Red Wings.
The 40-year-old coach, taking

---WILLGRIHSLE Y--
(Ed. note: This article is the first in a six-part series by Associated'
Press sports writer Will Grimsley. The Daily will carry the first five parts
this week, with the final installment in next Tuesday's paper.-P.B.)
NEW YORK - "It's like having 280 kids in college at the
same time," one athletic director of a large mid-west university
groaned. "It's a financial back-breaker."
College athletics are in a money bind. They have become a
high-pressured, multi-million dollar business on most campuses.
Costs have multiplied in the last decade. Football, once the
breadwinner, no longer pays the freight.
Business managers - with a few exceptions, such as at
Alabama and Notre Dame - are tightening their belts and put-
ting in new orders for red ink.
Notre Dame's athletic budget has risen from $900,000
"in 1963-64 to $2,000,000 in 1968-69 but it manages to oper-
ate in the black. Michigan State has seen its sports outlay
mushroom from $1J,7,00 in 1947 to $1,634,000 in 1967, an
increase of 1,100 per cent.
In the Big Ten, long the symbol of big time.college foot-
ball, six of the ten members are reported operating at a
loss. In the Big Eight, Kansas' budget has risen from
$850,000 to $1.4 million in four years.
The sprawling universities of .the Pacific Coast are simi-
larly affected. In the hotbeds of the South and Southwest,
where bowl teams are spawned, many of the colleges are de-
pendent on booster clubs to keep their heads above water.
At major universities, athletic budgets run from $1,500,000
to as high as $3,200,000, the figure for Ohio State's 18-sport
program.
Most of the sky-rocketing cost is purely economic, like the
housewife's grocery list. The flashy gear to outfit one player
runs around $150, quadruple what it was a few years ago. Jet
travel costs more. Hotel and food prices have escalated.
The heavyburden, however, lies in the housing, feeding
and educating of athletes on the cuff, so to speak. They are
the players on grants-in-aid. They are given a free college
education for their exploits on the field. In some cases,
they are unlimited and run from $1,500 to $3,000 per year
for each athlete.
Despite skyrocketing costs, many institutions, in order to
keep pace with the escalation of big time college sport, have
found it necessary to invest in giant, modern athletic complexes
costing millions.
Purdue has just unveiled a new $17 million field house.
Michigan's similar plant cost $14 million. Indiana has a new
stadium and has authorized a new field house.
Notre Dame is completing an $8.6 million convocation and
athletic building. Tennessee has one of the most modern sports
plants in the country. Alabama has just opened a Sports Soli-
seum that makes the Taj Mahal look like Tobacco Road.
"These are not luxuries but necessities," argues a spokes-
man for the NCAA headquarters in Kansas City. "They are
built to fill the needs of an exploding campus population."
Purdue's enrollment jumped from 12,700 in 1957 to
24,140 in 1967. The Big Ten, long symbolic of big time
football, has seen its total enrollment jump 50 per cent in
six years, with a present average of more than 29,000.
Michigan State has 38,100 students, Ohio State 31,800.
On the Pacific Coast, Washington, UCLA and California are
pushing 30,000.
"These student increases mean an expansion in facilities,"
the NCAA spokesman said. "More club sports, more teachers
and' coaches." That's just part of the problem. Students are
given a priority on football tickets at a nominal fee of $1 each
or nothing at all if included in student fees.
They are crowding out thousands of potential $5 and $6
customers in 60,000-seat stadiums.
Next: What's the cure?

over from Sid Abel, 50, who re-
mains as general manager, said he
hadn't "seen too many bodies fly-;
ing last season." Gadsby referred
to the Wings', noticeable weakness
on defense.
"I'm going to emphasize -- de-
mand - more defensive effort,"
Gadsby said. "When the forwards
can come up the ice against you
with their heads down - then
you're in trouble."
No formal contract was signedj
and Gadsby's salary was not dis-
closed. Bruce A. Norris, club pres-
ident, said, "I do not believe in
contracts. I'm happy and Bill is
satisfied."'
Norris added, "If we did not
want Bill or he did not want us,
we would both like to be free."
He said the Wings never have
written contracts with the team's
top management people. The
Wings have attracted attention in
recent months by a series of
trades. The latest brought de-'
fenseman Bobby Baun from the
Oakland Seals.
Abel denied emphatically a ru-
nor that the Red Wings would
trade Prank Mahovlich to the
Montreal Canadiens for Henri
Richard, Dick Duff and Ted
Harris.
Gadsby said that as new coach:
he has no plans for trades. "No-
body's on the black list. We have:
nothing in the wind, but if some-
body comes to us, we'll listen,"
he said.;
Gadsby began his NHL career
with the 1946-47 Chicago Black'
Hawks. In 1954 he went to the
New York Rangers who sent him
to Detroit in 1961.
After retiring as a player in
1965, Gadsby coached the Ed-
monton Oil Kings in the western'
Canadian Junior hockey league
the past two seasons.

g
Major League Standings

1

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE

St. Louis
Atlanta
San Francisco
Philadelphia
Chicago
xLos Angeles
Cincinnati
xPittsburgh
Houston
New York

W L
28 21
27 22
27 23
23 21
23 23
25 26
23 24
19 24
21 27
20 27

Pct.
.571
.551
.540
.523
.521
.490
.489
.442
.438
.426

GB
1
2V2
2
4
4
6
612

Detroit
Baltimore
Cleveland
Minnesota
Boston
Oakland
New York
Chicago
California
Washington

W
30
28
28
25
24
23
22
21
22

L
'18
22
24
24
24
27
26,
28

Pct.
.625
.583
.560
.510
.500
.489
.449
.447
.440

GB
2
3
52
6
8
8 r
9

Automatic Slick Shift

_0'

team turned out to be a lack of As for Minnesota, it is hard to
run-producers, beat a team that makes a tradi-
"We had three steady hitters tion of winning the Big Ten and
with averages above .340.' But, NCAA title every . election year
after that the next regular was since 1956.

19 29 .396 11i

x-Late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 1, san Francisco 0
St. Louis 7, Houston 2
Atlanta 3, Cincinnati 2
Pittsburgh at Los Angeles, inc.
Only games scheduled

Yesterday's Results
Boston 4, Detroit 3
Baltimore 2, CalIfornia 0
Minnesota 4, New York 3
Cleveland 3, Chicago 2, 14 innings
only games scheduled

I

INTERIOR DECORATING
CLASSES
Larry Klein Interiors is now offering
a 3-week interior decorating course, to
be held twice weekly on Tuesday and
Thursday evenings starting June 18th:
This course will be instructed by Mr.
Klein. The cost is $35. Call 761-1283.
Larry Klein Interiors
311 S. Fifth Avc.

After to these many years our humble
little bug has gone automatic.
Gone is the clutch.
Gone is the wifely whine, "it's cute, but
I can't drive it."
Gone is an era of Volkswagendom.Sniff.
And in its place?
A Volkswagen you can drive all over
town without shifting.
Only on the highway do you shift.
Once.(Thisisan economy move.Which,
after all, is still the name of the game.)
But you 'do have a choice in the matter-
you can drive it the easy way (described
above). Or you can start out in low and
take it through the gears like a regular
stick shift.
The automatic stick shift is an option:
you pay a little more.
But you do a little less.

1
T.

It

1r

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LOUISVILLE (P) -- Attorneys
for Peter Fuller asked the Ken-
tucky State Racing Commission
yesterday to overrule findings by
Churchill Downs stewards that

$10

CD PG

O T - - 31EritE..mi

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