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May 18, 1968 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, May 18, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, May 18, 1968

n ..

WHERE DOES
UGENE McCARTHY STAND?

Athletics feels racial tension

By The Associated Press i
i Negro athletes at 10 big Amer-
iian universities have presented
demands ranging from appoint-
ment of Negro coaches to selec-
tion of a Negro girl cheerleader,
and threatened boycotts.
In only one current case, how-
ever, are athletes at a major
school remaining away from
drills. This is at the University
of California at Berkeley, where
14 Negro football players are boy-
cotting spring practice.
Coach Ray Willsey says they
have demanded the right to say
who should play which position
and when.
The incident involving the girl
cheerleader occurred at the Uni-
versity of Kansas. Fifteen' Negro
football players boycotted spring
drill for two days on the grounds
there were no Negro girls on the
eight member "pom pom" team,
no Negro coach, no Negro history
course and few Negro faculty
members.
The university agreed to put a
Negro girl on the "pom pom"
team, the first ever. She is Bari
Robinson, 20, of Kansas City.

The university also agreed to of-
fer a Negro history course next
fall and said it was always look-
ing for good Negro professors.
The hiring of a Negro football
coach will be discussed later by
the athletic department.'
At two other schools, the Uni-
versity of Oklahoma and the Uni-
versity of Texas at El Paso, Negro
athletes were dropped from teams
after an exchange of recrimina-
tions, but at Oklahoma have since
been reinstated.
Eleven Negro track and field
performers at the University of
Texas-El Paso were dropped aft-
er a fuss that started when eight
of the Negro athletes, including
star broad jumper Bob Beaman,
refused to participate in a meet
at Brigham Young University.
They said the attitude on the
BYU campus, a Mormon institu-
tion, was that Negroes were an
inferior people.
Four Negro track men at Okla-
homa were dropped but soon re-
instated. Both white and Negro
members of the team had pre-
sented grievances but both sides
apologized.'

Six members of the Marquette Thomas, threatened to boycott alll
University basketball team, in- sports if seven demands were not
cluding junior ace George Thomp - met. These included a protest at
son, threatened to withdraw from academic counseling designed
school in a dispute over hiring of "for blacks to place them in
a Negro administrator. However courses where they will maintain
the Rev. Bernard Cooke told pro-, eligibility."
testors Thursday night that he Michigan State recently hired
and two other priests would quit a Negro assistant football coach
the faculty if Athe Roman Catho- and the trustees have approved
lic university failed to meet stu- the appointment of another in
dent demands in 48 hours. track. Football players missed one
Hiring of Negro coaches was at practice, but Thomas said offi-
stake at Michigan State where 38 cials had shown enough concern
of the university's Negro ath- to warrant the return of the ath-I
letes, led by football star Lamarr letes.
Image ready for, Prakness;
Kentucky changes test rule

DICTIONARY OF AMERICAN POLITICS.
Senator Eugene J. McCarthy. This modern,
easy-to-use dictionary of American poli-
tics, by a leading contender for the Presi-
dency, contains over 1,000 entries covering
federal, state and local governments; for-
eign affairs; politics and political parties;
interest groups; and political theory. Scores
of cartoons, photographs and charts sup-
plemen t the text. A book of unusual im-
portanceand interest in this election year.
R42. $1.25

BALTIMORE (P-Forward Pass1
and Dancer's Image, who com-
bined two weeks ago in the most
controversial Kentucky Derby
ever, met again Saturday in the
93rd running of the Preakness.
Dancer's Image was disqualified
because traces of medication were

Also standing in a prominent spot on
the shelves of your campus bookstore:

w

I

ON ESCALATION. (Revised Editioh).
Herman Kahn. In one of the most widely
discussed and influential books of recent
years, Herman Kahn probes the dynamics
of escalation and demonstrates how the
intensification of conflict can be depicted
by means of a definite escalation ladder,
which leads to all-out war. Thermonuclear
annihilation, says the author, is unlikely to
come through accident; buttnations may
elect to climb the ladder to extinction.
A988. $1.65

h
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PSYCHOLOGICAL HABITUATION TO WAR:
VIETNAM AS A CASE STUDY
A LECTURE BY
ISADORE ZIFERSTEIN, M.D.
Research Psychiatrist, Mt. Sinai Hospital, Los Angeles

PENGUIN BOOKS INC
3300 Clipper Mill Road Baltimore, Md. 21211

found in his urine following his
Louisville triumph, and Forward
Pass, who finished second, was
named the winner.
The 12 days of verbal sparring
since the disqualification has
made their rematch here one of
the most talkedof events of this
or any racing season.;I
They will come to the post at
5:30 p.m., EDT, wit height other
3-year-olds for the 1 3-16-mile
tour in front of the jam-packed
stands of the Pimlico Race Track.
The run for the Blackeyed Susans
will be televised nationally.
Meanwhile, at Louisville, the
Kentucky Racing Commission is-
sued an order yesterday requiring
the first three .'finishers in all
stakes races to be tested after-
wards.
The commission also stipulated
that the customary tests be given
a fourth horse, chosen by lot.
At present, only the winner and
one other horse are examined.
State Racing Commission stew-
ard Lewis Finley said the order
becomes effective immediately and
will apply to the running of theI
$15,000-addsd Bashford Manor
Stakes at Churchill Downs today.
.The commission did not: ex-
plain its announcement, butit
apparently stemmed from the
controversy over , he disqualifica-
tion of Dancer's Image as the
Winner of the Kentucky Derby.
The stewards also said Forward}
Pass, the Calumet Farm horse
which, finished second in the Der-
by, would be recognized as the
winner..
Forward Pass did not undergo
the urine test since the horse
chosen by lot that day was Ken-
tucky Sherry,

Grayl e Howlett
OFF BASE
This past week Joe Garagiola, the fugitive from Spaghetti
Hill, who made a career in show business because he couldn't
make one in baseball, 'has been subbing for Johnny Carson
on the Tonight show. He has featured, prominently the whole
week members of the sports world.
To this 'discerning eye, Garagiola's stint as the Tonight
jockey is more than a substitute role. The executives at NBC
are secretly piloting a new show.
Since most people think professional sports are just a sub-
sidiary of show business, why not a late night sports talk
show? It would probably go something like this:
Announcer: It's Thursday, May 26, in New York and
time for the Tonight show. Join us now as Joe Garagiola
greets his guests-Carl Yastrzemski, Jean-Claude Killy,
Ara Parseghian, Frank Gifford, Sonny Liston, Rick Barry
-along with Jim "Mudat" Grant and his orchestraand
me.... I'm Commissioner Eckert.
And now, he-e-e-e-r-r-e-e-e's Joe! (Applause, ap-
plause) Garagiola: Thank you, thank you very much. And
may the bird of Paradise get a strawberry from sliding into
second, (Laughter)
You sound like a good group. Last night's audience
wasn't the best. I didn't mind the booing and hissing so
nuch, but when that little old lady jumped up and yelled,
"I was more entertained at the first two Sonny Liston-Floyd
Patterson fights; now that hurt." (Laughter)
As most of you know, I used to play baseball. I was a
much travelled ballplayer-I spent my time with a lot of
different clubs. It was sort of unique the way they used to
tell me that I had been traded. After a game I would come
into the dressing room, and I would find out that they had
rented out my locker.
I played with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1952 and we
lost 112 games. We were really bad. . . . I said, 'We wver
really bad."
Eckert: Oh,. .. How bad were you?
Garagiola: Great, Commissioner. You guys couldn't get me
Pete Rozelle. We were so bad that the ifront office was pay-
ing us bonuses to sign with other clubs. (Tittering)
Laugh it up, folks. You don't get rain checks here.
How is it going, Commissioner. Say would you like to
give us a preview of the big games this weekend in base-
ball?
Eckert: Sure, Joe. In the National League Milwaukee opens
up a very crucia' series in Brooklyn. And over in the Amer-
ican League, the St. Louis Browns take on the Phila-
mean Kansas City A's in a big one.
Garagiola: Great, Commissioner, you're right up on it.
And there he is, Jim "Mudat" Grant and his orchestra.
Jim, that's sure an unusual outfit you've got on. Where did
you get it?
Grant: Well, Joe, I made it out of my old.Dodger uniform.
Garagiola: Oh, I see. You've got the number on the back
and everything. Hey, where's your banjo player; Maury
Wills?
Grant: He'll be a little late, Joe, They've gone into extra
innings over at Shea Stadium.
Garagiola: O-kay. We've got a great show for you'tonight,
don't let this little bit fool you.
Let's see, we've got. Carl Yastrzemski, Carl's going to
do his Bobby Kennedy imitations and then he's going .to
show us how to make a non-fattening meal for Award
dinners.
Then we have Jean-Claude Killy, the great French
skier, who's going to tell us how to travelall over the world
on a strict amateur's budget.
And a real treat, Ara Parseghian, the football coach of
the Fightin' Irish at Notre Dame, is going to do a dramatic
reading of some of his famous half-time speeches, including
the "Win one for Nick Pietrasonte speech." You won't want
to miss that.
Frank Gifford will be out to hand out this year's awards
for the best commercials which featured athletes. They're
sealing the envelopes now.
And Rick Barry flew in from the coast to be on to-
night's show. We' be talking about his new contract with
the Oakland Oaks. You'll remember he signed the other
day for an estimated million dollars plus a controlling
share in Pat Toone.
And whom am I leaving out? Oh, yeah, speak of the
bear, Sonny Liston is here. He's going to do some selected
readings from Jean-Paul Sartre-at least, the passages
with words, that are no more than two syllables.
Is he smiling, gang? Good.
Stick around, we'll have a few more surprises. And now
a word from your local balllub....
Remember, you heard it here first.
- - ---,. - = - -

RUMMAGE SALE

4.

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(By the author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!",
".Dobie Gillis, etc.)
MONEY: THE STORY OF AN ENGINEER
We all know, of course, that in this age of technology
every engineering senior is receiving fabulous offers of
employment, but do we realize just how fabulous these
offers are? Do we comprehend just how keenly industry
is competing? To illustrate, let me cite the true and typi-
cal case of E. Pluribus Ewbank, a true and typical senior.
One day last week while strolling across the M.I.T
campus, E. Pluribus was hailed by a portly and prosper-
ous man who sat in a yellow convertible studded with
precious gem stones. "Hello," said the portly and pros-
perous man, "I am Portly Prosperous, president of
American Xerographic Data Processing and Birth Con-
trol, Incorporated. Are you a senior?"
"Yes, sir," said E. Pluribus.
"Do you like this car ?" said Portly,
"Yes, sir," said E. Pluribus.
'It's yours," said Portly.
"Thanks, hey," said E .luribus.
"Do you like Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades?"
said Portly.
"What clean living, clean shaven American does not?"
said E. Pluribus.
"Here is a pack," said Portly. "And a new pack will
be delivered to you every twelve minutes as long as you
live."
"Thanks, hey," said FE. Pluribus.
"Would your wife like a mink coat ?" said Portly.
"I feel sure she would," said E. Pluribus, "but I am
not married."
"Do you want to be?" said Portly.
"What clean living, clean shaven American does not?"
said E. Pluribus.
Portly pressed a button on the dashboard of the con-
vertible and the trunk opened up and out came a nubile
maiden with golden hair, rosy knees, a perfect disposi-
tion, and the appendix already removed. "This is Svet-
lana O'Toole," said Portly. "Would you like to marry her?"
"Is her appendix out ?" said E. Pluribus.
"Yes," said Portly.
"Okay, hey," said E. Pluribus.
"Congratulations," said Portly. "And for the happy
bride, a set of 300 monogrammed prawn forks."
"Thanks, hey," said Svetlana.
.Y i
"nows then," said Portly to E. Pluribus, "let us get
down to business. My company will start you at $75,000
ahyear. You will retire at full salary upon reaching the
age oeu We will give you an eleven-story house made of
lapis lazui, each room to be stocked with edible furniture.
tiour children will receive a pack of Personna Super
Stainless Steel Blades every twelve minutes as long as they
shall live. We will keep your teeth in good repair and also
the teeth of your wife and children unto the third genera-
tion.'We will send your dentist a pack of Personna Super
Stainless Steel Blades every twelve minutes as tong as
he shall live, and thereafter to his heirs and assigns...
Now, son, I want you to think carefully about this offer.
Meanwhile here is 50 thousand dollars in small, un-
marked bills which places you under no obligation what-
soever."
"Well, it certainly seems like a fair offer," said E.
Pluribus. "But there is something you should know. I am
not an engineer. In fact I don't go to M.I. at all. I just
iw+ 11;.a4 n~~rnw t,,,~r 4..,------------------4,-,.----,T - V.....,..-.

MONDAY, MAY 20,1968

8 p.m.

5330 MEDICAL SCIENCE BLDG. (Forest and Catherine)
Public Invited
Discussion by
MARTIN PATCHEN, PhD.
Senior Study Director, Survey Research Institutk,&
Assistant Prof. of Psychology
SPONSORED BY HEALTH PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS CONCERNED
ABOUT VIETNAM AND THE INTERFAITH COUNCIL FOR PEACE

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WORSHIP

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William-on the Campus
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Family Service-8:15 a.m.
Regular Service-9:15 and 11:00 a.m.
Theme: "The Lemon Tree," Visiting Minister,
Dr. A. Vaughn Abercrombie.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-Coffee.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"The Essence and Expression of
Faith." .
7:00 p.m.-"Our District and National Con-.
ference-Privilege and Responsibility."
9:30 p.m.-College and Careers Fellowship.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
f llfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 a.m.-Service, with Com-
munion, Sermon bw the Rev. Richard
Kapfer.
Sunday at 11:00 a.m.-Bible Study of Gospel
according to John.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Supper-Program, New
Guinea Missionaries Mr. and Mrs. Daniel
Kunert, Guests.
Wednesday at 8:30-Study of World Council
of Churches Bible Discussions.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Ascension Eve
Communion Vespers.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.,
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m., and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Ministerx
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.--Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.

4

ALDERSGATE STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP and THE ANN ARBOR
FREE METHODIST CHURCH
1700 Newport Road
David E. Jefford, Pastor
945 a.m.-Discussion.
7:00 p.m.-Vespers.
For transportation call 663-2869.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761 -0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.+--Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion
11 :00 a.m.-Coffee in the lounge.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Percival Lerseth, Pastor
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
3:30 p.m.-Picnic.

Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

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FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "You Can't Resign from a Revo-
lution."
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt, Paul Swets,
10:30 a.m.-"Christ Power," Rev. Paul Swets.
7:00 p.m.--'Solutions to Racial Unrest"-
Panel Discussion.

Sun., May 19

1-6 P.M.
9 A.M.- 1P.M.

Newman Center
331 Thompson St.
(near William)
Committee of Responsibility for War-Burned and
War-Injured Vietnamese Children-Sponsor
-4

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CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister'
Guest Speaker, Mr, Hans Morsink.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship Service.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worschip Service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services. Sunday School

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST!
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt)
W. C. Wright

Armin C. Bizar,

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THE FIRST ANNUAL,

IVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PRESENTS

9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m -Church School.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Moynard
11:00 a.m.-Play: "Heaven or Hell." The

Arthur H. Vandenberg Lecture..
on merican Foreign Policy
by
MR. JAMES B. RESTON
Executive Editor, The New York Times

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