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May 01, 1968 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1968-05-01

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

.....h.TE.IC IAN..L.Wdesa..ay1 16

r N STUDENTSD
INDIAN BEDSPREADS
Q PERSIAN BED SPREADS S
NUMDAH RUGS"
WOOD BLOCK PRINTS
HAND PAINTED SCROLLS
INDIA ART SHOP v
330 Maynard
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Tigers caged

by Oakland,

still

hold

first

.

ON STATE STREET
IT'S WILD'S FOR LEVI'S

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Ramon Webster
slammed a three-run homer in the
first inning and Paul Lindblad
protected the lead with a 41/3 in-
nings of perfect relief pitching as
the Oakland Athletics turned back
Detroit 3-1 last night.
The loss dropped the Tigers'
record to 12-5, although Detroit
still holds a one game lead over
second - place Minnesota. The
tigers have won only three of
their last seven games, after run-
ning up nine straight wins earlier
in the season.
Webster socked his second home
run of the season into the upper
right field stands off Earl Wilson,
2-3, scoring Bert Campaneris, who
had walked, and Sal Bando, who
singled.
Lindblad, a left-hander, replaced
Ed Sprague with two out and two
men on in the fifth and retired
Jim Northrup on a pop fly. He
breezed through the next 12 hit-
ters, striking ou~t four..
Sprague had relieved injured
Oakland starter Jim Nash in the'

fourth after Nash caught his+
spikes on the rubber and pulled
a hamstring muscle while pitch-
ing to Ray Oyler in the fourth.
The Tigers scored their only
run in the second on Dick Mc-
Auliffe's run-scoring double.
BOSTON - Pitcher Dave Bos-
well cracked a homer and a run-
producing double before needing
relief help from Al Worthington
yesterday in the Minnesota, Twins'
7-6 victory over the Boston Red
Sox for a sweep of a two-game
series.
Joe Foy sent the Red Sox out
to a 2-0 first-inning lead with his
first homer of the season, but the
Twins came back with six runs in
the next four innings.
Harmon Killebrew tripled and
scored on an infield out in the
second. Boswell led off the third
with a homer into the left field
screen and Killebrew later drove
in a run with a sacrifice fly.
* * *
BALTIMORE - The Baltimore
Orioles scored three unearned
runs and edged the New York
Yankees 6-5 last night as reliever
Moe Drabowsky put down a
ninth-inning uprising.
Drabowsky took over for Eddie
Watt, the third Baltimore pitcher,
after the Yankees had scored two
runs and had the bases loaded
with one out in the ninth.
Pinch hitter Frank Fernandez,
attempting to squeeze the tying
run home, bunted a soft liner to
first baseman Boog Powell, who
stepped on the bag to double up
Dick Howser.
* * *
SAN FRANCISCO-Left-hander
Ray Sadecki scattered 10 hits and

'pitched out of five jams in the
first six innings as the San Fran-
cisco Giants defeated Atlanta 7-0
yesterday behind a rash of stolen
bases.
The Giants, who had stolen only
two bases in their first 16 games,
swiped four and all resulted in
runs.
Sadecki, 3-1 with an 0.25 earned
run average, was staked to the
only run he needed in the first
inning when Ron Hunt was hit by
a pitch, stole second and scored
on Willie McCovey's single.'
* * *
HOUSTON - Larry Dierker's
two-hit pitching and a three-run
burst in the eighth inning carried
the Houston Astros to a 3-0 vic-
tory over Cincinnati last night.
The Astros reeled off five dou-
ble plays, a club record, in sup-
port of Dierker, 2-3, who walked
three and struck out seven.

*

*.

*

*

*

'Celticsbounce Lakers in overtime .

By The Associated Press
BOSTON - The Boston Celtics
blew a 14-point fourth-quarter
lead and then bounced back be-
hind Don Nelson and John Hav-
licek for a 120-117 overtime vic-
tory over Los Angeles last night,
moving within one triumph of re-
gaining the National Basketball
Assocation championship.
Nelson scored five of his 27
points in the five-minute extra;
session in helping the Celtics take
a 3-2 lead in the best-of-7 series,
scheduled to resume in Los An-
geles tomorrow night.
Havlicek, going the distance
nce again like a true marathoner,

I

*

Major League Standings

Check out the
switched on
S sndal

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Won Lost Pet.
Detroit 12 5 .706
Minnesota 11 6 .647
Baltimore 10 6 .625
xWashington 10 7 .588
Boston 8 8 .500
NewYork 8 9 .471
California 8 10 .444
Oakland 8 10 .444
Cleveland 6 11 .353
xChicago 2 11 .154
x-Late game not included
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Oakland 3, Detroit 1 X
California 5, Cleveland 3
Minnesota 7, Boston 6.,t
Baltimore 6, New York 5
Washington 4, Chicago 4
after nine innings
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at Detroit, night
Washington at Chicago, night
Oakland at Cleveland, night
New York at Baltimore, night
California at Boston, night

GB
1
2
31
4
41.
8

Won
xSt. Louis 12
San Francisco 10
xLos Angeles 9
Pittsburgh 8
Philadelphia 8
Cincinatti 8
Atlanta 8
Chicago 8
New York 7
Houston 7

Lost
5
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
9
10

Pct.
.706
.588
.529
.500
.471
.471
.444/
.444
.438
.412

GB
2
3
3'
4
4
5't

NATIONAL LEAGUE

hit for four crucial points in the Havlicek hit on a jump shot
overtime, finishing with 31. with 38 seconds remaining. Then
The Celtics fell behind 115-113 Boston player-Coach Bill Russell
with less than two minutes left blocked a shot by Elgin Baylor
but Larry Siegfried, who had only and Nelson picked off the loose
two field goals, grabbed a re- ball and was fouled. He converted
bound for a lay-up to tie the count the free throw and time ran out
115-all. on the Lakers.
Nelson then took a rebound | Russell cited Nelson's "greatest
and went up through a traffic jam game" as a big key to the over-
under the basket to put in a shot, time victory. "Under the condi-
sending the Celtics ahead 117-115. tions, that was his greatest game
Jerry West banged a jump shot ever," Russell said of his reserve
to tie the score at 117 with 56
seconds left, but it was the cornerman who scored 27 points
Lakers' last gasp. and took 12 rebounds.
IBamgartner voted most
improved 'Al' gridder
Bob Baumgartner, a junior
guard on the 1967 Wolverine foot-
ball squad, was named recipient
of the Meyer Morton Trophy as
the most improved player in spring
practice.
Head coach Bump Elliott made
the announcement before the
final spring scrimmage Saturday,
April 13.
A six-foot, 215-pounder, Baum-
gartner was a regular at right
guard last fall. He was shifted to
the left side of the line this spring,
where he has also earned a start-
ing berth.
He becomes the second straight
Chicagoan to receive the Morton
award. The trophy went to guard
Dick Yanz ,last spring.
The 1967 Navy football squad
selected, Baumgartner, along with
halfback Ron Johnson, to its all-
opponent team.
Many of Michigan's finest foot-
ball players in the past have been
named Morton winners, including
Tom Mack, Tom Keating, and Bill
Freehan. Al Wistert and Congress-
man Gerald Ford have also been
honored as Morton Trophy win-
ners. BOB BAUMGARTNER

a

x-Late game not included
YESTERDAY'S RESJLTS
New York 1, Philadelphia 0"
San Francisco 7, Atlanta 0
Pittsburgh 4, Chicago 3, night
Houston 3, Cincinnati 0, night
St. Louis at Los Angeles, night
TODAY'S GAMES
Philadelphia at New York, night
Chicago at Pittsburgh, night
St. Louis at Houston, night
Cincinnati at San Francisco, night
Atlanta at Los Angeles, night

$1200-

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This autobiographical book about a personal experience
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After lo these many years ocrr humble
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your dates would be "per-
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Call, write, and tell your friends
8 1 J A

11

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!11

-

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