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September 16, 1960 - Image 22

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M Building Now Open

By BOB ROMANOFF j
'his week the large Intramural
iding, located on Hoover just
St of State, opened its doors fol-
ing the summer vacation usher-
in the 49th year of I-M sports
Michigan.
the hours will be from 8 a.m. to
p.m. on weekdays and from
ht to noon on Saturdays.
the actual I-M program won't
rt until a week from Monday

with the opening of the touch
football season. The International
Center soccer program will start
the third Monday of the fall term.
Defending Champs
The defending champions in
touch football are Sigma Alpha
Bpsilon in the Social Fraternity,
division; Kelsey, Residence Halls;
Nu Sigma Nu, Professional Fra-
ternities; Business Administration,
Faculty; and Evans Scholars in
the Independent League.

ew Teams Dominate
n 48-Year I-M History

Michigan has been a power in
te Western Conference for many
cades-ever since there was an
ganized league.I
Similarly, there have been per-
mnial powers in Michigan's intra-
ural system since its founding
me 48 years ago.
The Residence Halls champion
st year was Kelsey, but the great-
t power of last decade is Gom-r
rg, winner of the overall honors
. eight out of the last 11 years.
A similar reversal occurred last
ar as Sigma Alpha Epsilon won
s first social fraternity all-year
iampionship. SigmaPhi Epsilon,
bich had a stranglehold on the
'erall championships for more
an a decade, lost for the second
nsecutive year. Other powers
rough the years have been Phi
elta Theta with five all year

championships, Beta Theta Pi and
Theta Chi with four each, and
Sigma Chi. The latter has won
only one all-year championship
but have taken more individual
titles than any other fraternity.
Team to Beat
Nu Sigma Nu has been the pro-
fessional fraternity team to beat in
practically every sport as it
excels in major and minor sports
alike. The medical fraternity has
won the professional fraternity
all year championship perennially
for eleven years.
The Seldom Seen Kids domi-
nated the independent sports pro-
gram for many years, but recently
the Gomberg Older Element, the
Evans Scholars, the Newman Club,
and various co-ops have taken
over.
Upsets will undoubtedly be
sprinkled profusely in the Big Ten
meets this year. They should also
help to highlight this year's intra-
mural program.

China won the International
Center soccer title last year.
It is interesting to note that all
these teams went on to win the
all-year title in their respective
leagues.
Players and/or teams interested
in competing in the International
Center or Independent Leagues
should get in touch with the I-M
department immediately.
Head Program
Heading the I-M program will
be director Earl Riskey and asso-
ciate director Rod Grambeau.
Their graduate assistants are Hal
Managers Wanted
Freshmen or sophomores in-
terested in becoming managers
of the Michigan football team I
are asked to contact senior
manager Fred Nemacheck at
the practice field' behind Yost
Fieldhouse between 3:30 and
5:30 any day within the next
week.
Vander Zwaag, Bud Dornbos, Bill
Ruffer, Herb Deromide, Andy Bay-
lock, John Smith and Mike Seliger.
Next Wednesday all athletic
managers will meet at the I-M
Building to get schedules and dis-
cuss matters pertinent to the suc-
cess of the I-M program during
the coming year.
One major problem facing the
I-M department is the need of offi-
cials for touch football. Inter-
ested persons should contact the
department in person or by phone.
The number is NO 3-4181. The pay
is $1.50 per game.
The I-M co-recreational pro-
gram will start on Friday, October
7th. The hours will be from 7:30
to 10 p.m.

MAN i I1('t kmt
by MIKE GILLMAN
Outlook
HERE ARE the big things that will break on the Michigan sports
front in the coming school year. Keep your eyesopen for some of
the best in sports action!
Almost a sure bet to be the top attraction, both gatewise .and in-
terestwise, in Ann Arbor this fall is the initial meeting of the brothers
Elliott. For the first time, these two youthful coaches will do battle and
the meeting is sure to fill Michigan Stadium and columns of news-
paper copy for weeks prior to the game.
When Pete Elliott brings his squad here for the November 5 con-
test to face Michigan and brother Bump, all hell should break loose.
Another high spot of the fall campaign will be the October 22
Homecoming battle with Little Brown Jug rival Minnesota. The Go-
phers will be out to avenge the 1959 Wolverine win before partisan
Minnesota fans in Minneapolis.
The basketball season will be drawing one long-continual glance
from Wolverine fans. New head coach Dave Strick will have his hands
full as he takes over last season's cellar-dwellers and tries to pull
them up by the bootstraps.
Strack's charges will be faced with some top competition this
season as local fans are treated to top-flight play.
The 1960 NCAA championship team, Ohio State, will invade Yost
Fieldhouse, with star Olympian Jerry Lucas leading the Buckeyes.
Two other teams that bred Olympic stars of the hardcourt will tangle
with the Wolverines, Indiana and Purdue, making things tough for
the new coach, but providing some top action for local cage fanatics.
Sports railbirds will get an opportunity to see how the three-year
hockey rebuilding program is coming.. Hockey mentor Al Renfrew, in
his fourth season as head coach, should see the intensive recruiting
efforts of his first year finally show results. Gradually the pucksters
have moved up in the hockey world. Last year's 13-13 record was his
best effort and a strong group of juniors this year could better that.
One of the top spectacles for Michigan fans in the upcoming
school year will be the efforts of the swimming team to regain their
national championship. The Wolverines lost out to Southern Cali-
fornia in the NCAA meet last spring after a three-year reign over the
nation's tankmen.
Leading the swimmers this season will be a group of Olympic-
seasoned swimmers, including gold medal winner Bob Webster and
bronze medal winner Dave Gillanders. As usual, Indiana will provide
the top competition in the Big Ten, while Southern Cal and Harvard
provide top national competition.

Phone NO 2-4786
or Classified Advertising

Non-Conference Games
The ruling handed down to In-
diana stated that none of its;
football games this year would
count in the Conference standings,
What this means is that Indiana's
games with Big Ten opponents
will merely be counted as non-
conference games.
Indiana also is barred from the
television receipts that the Big
Ten splits up from national or
regional telecasts. Finally, Indi-
ana can not share in any Rose
Bowl money that the Conference
might receiveĀ°this year.
Caught on Rebound
The Big Ten punihment caught
Indiana on the rebound from a
severe four year penalty inflicted
by the NCAA which put all Indi-
ana athletic teams on probation
for that period. This prohibits
Indiana from competing, in any
NCAA Championship Meet, or ap-
pearing on National television, for
four years.
Naturally, Indiana hopes that
the NCAA will relent and lessen
the penalty if the offenders show
good behavior. At the same time,
the Hoosiers , hope that the Big
Ten penalty will be only for one
year, although the case is being
held open by the Conference.
However, one thing that people
at Indiana from President Her-
man Wells on down, don't seem
to understand, is why the NCAA
punished all Indiana teams when
the violation occurred only in
football. To extend this, Indiana
sources can't come up with why
the Big Ten penalized them more
in addition to the NCAA ban. A
two or three penalty in football
seems to be a logical answer.
Ruling-)Hurt or Help?
One factor of the Big Ten's rul-
ing is that it could possibly hurt
or help the other teams in the
Conference football race, since an
extra game has often decided the
championship, as it did last year
when Wisconsin edged Michigan
Noted airline pilot
rides GO-KARTS
for relaxation!

7, in the midst of the Wolverines'l
four wins. The Hoosiers also beat'
Michigan, 8-6, in 1958 when they
surprisingly finished in the first

lations. These were printed in the
Indianapolis Star, on August 14,
with the names of the schools and
athletes left out.

Indiana Suffers Grid Penalty;
Conference Tilts Not to Count
By CLIFF MARKS
State by virtue of playing, and, division and will visit Ann Ar
Indiana's football team, a ris-~
ing power in the Big Ten Confer- winning one more Big Ten game, Nov. 12 for a "non-counter." TI
ence, was slapped down hard this Coach Phil Dickens has said that was Dickens' actual first year
summer by the Big Ten for re- the penalty won't cause his team Indiana as he was suspended
cruiting violations. to lose incentive, and that they 1957, for similar recruiting vio
Thus. Indiana's long wait was will play just that much harder tions.
over. The Hoosiers had been wait- to prove they can still win. Indi- After receiving news of the pc
ing since May for a much delayed ana finished in a tie for eighth alty, Indiana told of 33 cases wh
decision by the Conference offi- last year with Ohio State, al- they have in their files, of tea
Gals, though it plastered Michigan, 26- committing serious recruiting v

bor
hat
"at
in
la-
en-
ich
ams
vio-

I

NOTICE TOFRESHMEN:
Upon entering the University of Michigan you will
be faced with the chore of finding the proper place
which wl take care of your clothes, dry-cleaned
or laundered. To save you a lot of trouble trying
to find the right place by-trial or error-we invite
you cordially to stop in and get acquainted with us
-the right place for youfor service as you like it--
when you like it.
Everything brought in thoroughly cleaned and ex-
pertly pressed; cuffs brushed and tacked, missing
buttons replaced, rips mended - all these extras
included at our regular, moderate prices.
GOLD BOND CLEANERS
515 East William

GYM FANS will have a special treat this season as Coach Newt
Loken's charges play host to the Western Conference meet, March
3 and 4. Leading Loken's gymnasts will be Rich Montpetit, an Olym-
pian from Canada.
Sunniest prospects for the season are for the trafk team. An un-
usually strong group of seniors, including Tom Robinson, John Gregg,
Tony Seth, Les Bird, Marsh Dickerson, et. al., will pace the Wolver-
ines.
The Michigan thinclads have won the last two indoor Conference
meets and dropped the outdoor version to the Illinois squad. The 11-
lini were hit by graduation, and barring injuries, the Wolverines
should sweep through both Conference meets.
Baseball coach Don Lund wishes he had equally hopeful prospects.
But with star outfielder Wil Franklin inking a bonus pact with the
Detroit Tigers, Lund will have the job of building around only four
of last year's starters: outfielder Ed Hood, second baseman Barry
Marshall, third baseman Joe Murrelo, and catcher Dick Syring. And
the search fqr pitchers will continue.
The tennis team will try to provide Wolverine partisans with their
sixth Big Ten net crown in seven years. The defending titlists will
have captain Gerrie Dubie at number one singles. He lost out in tht
May meet, but paired with John Wiley for the number one doubles
crown.
The only defending Big Ten champ on the team will be senior
Bruce MacDonald, who took the number six singles title last May.
Another Michigan team will be out to defend a Conference title.
Coach Cliff Keen's wrestlers rolled to the championship at East Lan-
sing last March and will be looking for a repeat.
.All four of the Wolverine grapplers who took, individual titles,
Ambi Wilbanks, Fritz Kellerman, Jim Blaker and Dennis Fitzgerald,
will be back to bolster the squad.
In golf, coach Bert Katzemeyer will have a lot of work ahead of
him to raise last year's eighth place finishers. Captain Joe Brisson,
who last'year knocked off Ohio State's Jack Nicklaus, the National
Amateur champion, in dual competition, will provide the top thrills
for local links fans.
Here are the teams, the players, and the events. They'll provide
the thrills for you for the coming year. Go out and see them!
u8kv (,o

-AP Wirephoto
THE WAIT IS OVER -- Phil Dickens, Indiana football coach,
has finally heard the news on his team's fortunes for 1960. The
Big Ten decision, prolonged since the May meetings in East Lan.
sing, was reached August 13, and one ruling stated that Indiana's
football games against Big Ten opponents would count only as
non-conference tilts,

J

HouRs:

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