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September 16, 1960 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-16

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TRE MICHIGAN DAILY

1l

USNSA -CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS:
Advocate School Aid, Desegregation; World Youth Forum

<«

(Continued from Page I)

believes the responsibility of stu-
dent government is to represent
the majority of its electors on any
issue with which it is concerned'.
And that any limitation on this
function besides those imposed by
the students themselves are in-
consistent with the ideas of the
universal community of scholars.
USNSA asserts that the distinc-
tion between "on-campus" andj
"off-campus" issues has little
meaning in the student commu-
nity because many of the issues

beyond the geographical boundar- cational process that extends{
ies affect the student, beyond the classroom; it also in-
. « t volves the attainment of know-
PROJECT AWARENESS--The ledge and skills necessary for re-
USNSA recognizes that due to sponsible participation in affairs
little knowledge of its policies and of government and society.
projects on the campus level, that USNSA urges student participa-

A

S

going FOR CLASSE.

_.. _

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proper awareness of issues is not
generated nor problems well con-
sidered. 'USNSA decides that oneI
issue will be chosen for extensive
study and discussion on the in-
dividual campus. This same issuel
will be presented at the next Con-
gress. The national officers were
directed to investigate the possi-
btiliy of holding a national student
referendum on the issue.
NATIONAL DMMNSE EDUCA-
TION ACT--USNSA believes that
the federal government must use
its resources to meet the crisis in;
American education as private
and state aid are inadequate.,
USNSA urges the revision of the
National Defense Education Act
by replacing the loans with
scholarships; by not being selec-
tive as to the fields that can
benefit; eliminating those sections
that justify federal aid to educa-
tion solely on the basis of national
defense.
DISAPPROVAL OF LOYALTY
OATHS AND DISCLAIMER AF-
FIDAVITS-USNSA expresses its
general opposition to laws requir-
ing students as students to sign
loyalty oaths and disclaimer af-
fidavits and in particular the
Prouty Amendment. USNSA urges
delegation of the sections requir-
ing the loyalty oaths and. dis-
claimer affidavits, repeal of state
and local laws requiring the oaths
and affidavits for students or
faculty members. USNSA opposes
the oath and affidavit because of
the following: loyalty is based on
ideas and can't be legislated; they
do not serve their purpose as
subversives would not be hesitant
to sign; they discriminate against
college students and faculty.
* S'0
THE STUDENT IN THE TOTAL
COMMUNITY - USNSA believes
students often complete their edu-
cation without sufficient exper-
ience in the practical conduct of
government in a democratic social
order. The role of the student in-
volves a committment to an edu-

tion in legitimate social and
political activities. He should at-
tempt, wherever possible, to
channel his action through the
democratically - elected student;
government. The student govern-'
ment, in turn should itself be
committed to decision, action, and,
educating the campus to im-
portant issues. The USNSA shall
transmit to constituant student
bodies information, materials, and
aid that will give guidance in
local programs. It shall keep mem-
ber student bodies informed on
current problems. USNSA shall
express considered and forth-
right opinions on such of the
major issues of the day as have
come particularly to the atten-
tion of students. USNSA shall be
guided in the actions it takes by
the criteria of 1) importance and
efficacy of the action considered,
2) the expressed or potential in-
terest of students in the issues
and 3) the competancy of students
to evaluate and come to respon-
sible decisions.
* * *
CUBA-USNSA reaffirms its
traditional support of the Latin

American student's struggle
university reform with its

for
de-

mands for a greater say in the
operation in the institution. How-
ever, NSA recognized that for
Cuba there is not sufficient In-
formation for full evaluation of
the reforms, instituted and the
degree of existing academic free-
dom. Therefore, "USNSA views
the situation in Cuba with a mix-
ture of hope and concern, while
identifying deeply with the revolu-
tion's spirit of social and economic
reform, USNSA is sincerely con-
cered with the abridgement of the
press and civil liberties in Cuba.j
By forthrightly raising these cri-
ticisms, It is the hope of USNSA
that it can aid Cuban students in
their quest for a democratic re-
organization of the university and
Cuban society at large."
EXPULSIONS-- USNSA recog-
nizes that many colleges have ex-

pelled students for involvement
in controversial community af-
fairs. It condemns discriminatory
and arbitrary expulsions. US NSA
considers that expulsions 'due to
actions as an individual apart
from the institution, activities
within the scope of student
government or those which origin-
ate from a search for human
dignity and equality, violate aca-
demic freedom and student rights.
USNSA urges its regional of-
ficers and program vice-presidents
to investigate cases of expulsion,
and if facts warrant, recommend
reinstatement.
* C-S
HOUSE COMMITEE ON UN-
AMERICAN ACTIVITIES-
USNSA urges the committee be
dissolved unless it fulfills four
conditions-) have strong indi-
cations that individuals subpoened
can contribute significantly to the
legislative functioning of the com-
mittee; 2) allow the accused to
face his accuser and be fully in-
formed of the reasons for which
he has been subpoened, 3) ter-
minate its policy of publishing the
lists of those subpoened prior to
the time of the actual hearings:
4) restrict itself to its original
purpose of investigating with the
goal of initiating legislation. Un-
less these conditions are met,
USNSA believes the committee's
legislative functions should be
officially assumed by those com-
mittees of Congress which are at
present executing many of its
functions. USNSA will initiate an
educational campaign about the
committee's functions and history.
* * C
TURKEY AND SOUTH KOREA
--USNSA commends both - the
South Korean and Turkish stu
dents for taking the initiative to
improve the national, social and
political conditions which under
former forms of governments had
prevented full development of edu-
cational opportunities and demo-
cratic institutions. USNSA com-
mends the South Korean and
Turkish students for their per-
severance in adhering to the
principles of peaceful demon-
strations and for their responsible
actions in maintaining civil order.
* C * *
COMPULSORY ROTC-USNSA
belives that compulsory ROTC is
an infringement upon academic
,freedom, of questionable academic
value and a general waste of time
and fund. They said that a volun-
tary program of ROTC would re-
sult in more and better qualified
ROTC graduates at a reduced
cost. USNSA urged that com-
pusory ROTC be repealed in those
universities and colleges where it
now exists.
NUCLEAR TESTING - The
USNSA supports continuing ne-
gotiations to achieve a nuclear
weapons test ban. USNSA en-
courages students to inform them-
selves on th esubject of nuclear
experiments and test ban negotia-
tions and support all efforts that
will lead to an effective egreement
concerning the cessation of nu-
clear testing. USNSA belives that
students have a obligation to pro-
vide for present and future
generations a climate that will
promote international under-
standing and fellowship.

ALGERIA-USNSA condemned
the French authorities not only
for the suppression of academic
freedom within Algeria, but also
for violation of the student rights.
In particular USNSA "expresses
its deep solidarity with and
pledges its moral and material
support for the Algerian student,
calls for an immediate cessation!
of hostilities: condemns the denial
by the French authorities of the
most elementary and sacred
human rights; abhors the use of
torture under any circumstances;
respects the right of self-deter-f
mination, and therefore recognizes
that an independent Algeria is a
prerequiste for the realization of
academic freedom; and urges a
peaceful settlement between the
French and Algerian provisional
government so that Algerian stu-I
dents can exert their claim to a
full, free and democratic educa-
tion." USNSA also urges the
United States government to takei
all possible measures to end the
Algerian conflict.
RIGHT TO PROTEST-USNSA
asserts the right of the student to
protest actively but non-violently.
"Not only are demonstrations
legitimate methods of gaining,
particular social ends, but the
ends themselves - the establish-
ment of equal right and due
process and easing of world ten-
sions -- are also legitimate.
USNSA ieclares that the student
is capable of thought, evaluation,
and rational Independent decision
regarding the Issues he faces. Not
only is he capable of determining
the scope of his activity but he isc

also capable of judiciously selec
ing his leadership."
TOTALITARIANISM - (Bas
Policy Declaration) - "USNa
believes that totalitiarianism,
any form, including the can
munist form, is an infringemei
upon the individual rights of U
student and his opportunity
pursue his education in a fr
and unfettered atmospher
USNSA reaffirms its belief in
free university in a free sociel
and condemns all totalitaris
forms of government which pr
vent the realization of academ
freedom or university autonon
and which seek through the in
position of ideological loyalty
use educational and communic
tive institutions for the main
tenance and enforcement of
centralized dictatorial regime."
* C 0
THE KOCH CASE - (La
spring, Prof. Leo Koch of tV
University of Illinois, had a lett
published in the Daily Illini di
cussing the advisability of pr
martital sexual relations. As
result he was dismissed.) USNQ
affirms that it is not only U
right but the responsibility of t
individual to express his opinio
. .. such expression can't
abondoned because of the cl
troversial nature of the belie
affirmed .. . the responsibility
the teacher to state what 1
belives true . . .,is especial
great."
USNSA asserts that Prof Ko
was properly fulfilling his rig
and responsibility to express wh,
he thought was the truth ar
thus protests his dismissal.

at the head of the class

cta Naa t306 SOUTH STATE

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