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September 16, 1960 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

YGRESS MEETS:
NSA Issues Statements
On National Problems
(Con+tnua tfromPagm 1 I

Ha'Student
Earns Degree in Law

V"Abjoluu0u as Vacs rsssv of

"I would argue, however that if
the student when he is a student,
does not confront the issues of
modern life with great seriousness
and with an understanding that
he must come to an ultimate deci-
sion as to where he stands with
regard to those issues, then he
will not do so after college-he
will continue to let the other fellow
undertake the problems of public
affairs, he will continue to be one
of the most politically naive of the
world's students, and that finally
there will continue to exist a criti-
cal lack of political, moral, and,
intellectual leadership in this
land," Hayden concluded.
This resolution and the debate
which centered around it pin-
pointed the question which be-'
came the theme of the Congress:
are student leaders as representa-
tives of student opinion justified
or obligated to take stands on na-
tional and international issues?
Theme Pinpointed
The Congress was most nearly
polarized around this question,
with one faction presenting the
arguments outlined above and an-
other in favor of limitation in stu-
dent activities and government to
consideration of immediate, local-
ized problems.
In passing the declaration on
the student and the total com-
munity, the Congress effectively
agreed to expand their working
definition of the student's role,
and much of the legislation re-
flected the stand taken. After dis-
cussion and acceptance of the dec-
laration as basic policy, the Con-
gress tacitly worked as a body of
representative students in a world
context in handling business.
Support Sit-Ins
The Congress evinced strong
support for the sit-in movement
and for non-violent direct action

included non-violent picketing and
selective buying campaigns, fund
raising for legal defense and
scholarship assistance to Southern
students and continuing pressure
to eliminate discriminatory prac-
tices on the campuses of member
schools and surrounding communi-
ties.
The Congress passed a general
opposition to requirement of loyal-
ty oaths for students, and a similar
position was taken on compulsory
ROTC programs. Schools were
urged to work to eliminate these
requirements.
The. declaration on freedom of
the student press sustained the
expanded concept of the student's
role, stating that "the student
press must be completely self-
directed,"
Free Press
Within legal restrictions, the
student press must be permitted
to function "free of all student
or non-student administrative de-
vices, e.g., publication boards,
student government, faculty ad-
visers, civil or ecclesiastical
agencies" as well as from financial
pressure of any nature, USNSA
asserts.
USNSA further incorporated in-
to its codified policies the belief
that totalitarianism, in any form,
is an infringement on the in-
dividual rights of the student and
his opportunity to pursue his
education in a free and unfettered
atmosphere. Another basic policy
declaration established a ground-
ing for extended relations with
international student communities
and organizations.
In continuing Its 3-year con-
sideration of the question of nu-
clear testing, USNSA supported
efforts at the Geneva conference
to achieve an international ban'
on testing of nuclear weapons,
and also supported the present
moratorium on testing while nego-

By ANDY HAWLEY
George Mason, who has suffered
from cerebral palsey since birth,
graduated from the University law
school this summer, after eight
years on the Ann Arbor campus.
A native of Riga, Mich. Mason
graduated from Blissfield High
School and entered the literary
college in 1952. He was an honor
student in high school, and presi-
dent of the student council.
He is severely handicapped, with
limited use of his limbs and a
speech defect, and is confined to a
wheelchair. Despite these difficul-
ties Mason was extremely popular
at the University and sometimes
enjoyed leadership positions, as
well as a successful scholastic
career.
Lived in Scott
He lived in Scott House of South
Quad for five years. During that
time he was elected president of
the house, representative on the
South Quad Council and president!
of the Council.
Maintaining a B average in un-
dergraduate school, Mason was
awarded several University schol-
arships and grants. He received
his bachelor's degree in 1956 and
enrolled in law school.
Dean of Men Walter B. Rea!
called him "full of enthusiasm,
optimistic, and well-liked."
One of Mason's law professors,
Prof. Chesterfield Oppenheim, who
was also a favorite advisor while
Mason was in law school, said
Mason neither wanted nor received
any special favors, other than
those strictly necessary to his
peculiar circumstances, such as
the composition of examinations,
which took longer than usual,
since he had to dictate them to
another student.
During his career at the Univer-
II
I-Hop Selects .
'SaRhapsody'
For Theme
"Sea Rhapsody" will be the
theme of the 1960 Independent
Hop, co-chairman Dolores Gelios,
'62, announced yesterday.
"The I-Hop is a traditional cam-
pus dance held after the first
football game of the fall," she said.
The Assembly sponsored affair will
last from 9 to 12 p.m., Sept. 24 in
the League Ballroom.
Johnny Harberd and Andy An-
drews will supply music for the
affair.
Tickets are $2.50 per couple and
are available at the League Under-
graduate office and at the door.
Every social chairman in the wom-
en's residence halls will also have
tickets Monday through Friday of
next week.
The other co-chairmen of the
dance are Judy Levine, '2; 'and
Joan Studnicky, '62.

sity, Mason enjoyed several close
friendships among which there
were many students who willingly
ministered to physical needs.-
"He really has merit," Prof. Op-
penheim said. "With his mental
power he can analyze legal and
other problems. He stressed that,
although Mason necessarily needs
more time, to make up for his de-
ficient physicaldexterity, he is
intellectually and educationally
capable of dealing with legal and
other questions.
Stresses Humor
A student associate of Mason,
James Booker, lived with Mason
part of the time he studied law at
the University, stressed his sense
of humor and keen wit, as well as
his analytical mind and capacity
for creative thinking and great
concentration.
Mason's future occupation is still
uncertain. He has applied for a
Fulbright scholarship to study in
Europe. His best outlook, accord-
ing to Prof. Oppenheim, may be in
government research in legal
areas, such as the department of
justice.
"He is entitled," Prof. Oppen-
heim said, "to the opportunity to
live the professional life for which
he is prepared."

Free

A

DSeptember 17

.. . 8:00-12:00 P.M*

.

as a means of protest. Means cited tiations are in progress.

'folol'i,

( SoZone ..\
somewhere...
must think I'm.
wonderful" .
(Don't look now, Charlie
Brown, but we all do
BRW
By Charles M. Schulz
The brand new
collection of daily
PEANUTS strips.
Required reading
for allmajors!
ONLYo
Holt, Rinehart and Winston, inc.

8:30-11:00 Movies, 3R and

S

:MICHIGAN UNION
8:00-9:00 Jazz Concert, front steps

PET
NO
P

HILLELZAPOPPIN
ITIONING FOR CENTRAL COMMITTEE
W OPEN. -UNTIL SUNDAY, SEPT. 25.
>ETITIONS AT HILLEL FOUNDATION
9 A.M.-5P.M.
Don't miss this opportunity!

8:30-11:00 Gambling; Terrace Room
9:00-12:00 Free Dance, Ballroom
IFRTEEd
Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds!

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CARDS OF ADMISSION
FREE OF CHARGE.TO ALL

Read
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U

i

U.

of M.

STUDENTS

N

of the

REFORM JEWISH FAITH

The INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL
wishes to announce

I

for use at the

1 HIGH HOLY DAY

SERVICES

a

ern

R

S

TEMPLE BETH EL
8801 WOODWARD at GLADSTONE
DETROIT'
Phone: TRINITY 5-8530
ROSH HASHONO SERVICES
Wednesday Evening, Sept. 21 ..........7
Thursday Morning, Sept. 22 ............ 10

OCTOBE R 2-16

P.M.
A.M.

YOM KIPPUR SERVICES
Friday Evening, Sept. 30............... 7 P.M.
Saturday, Oct. 1, Day-long, beginning . .. 10 A.M.

* REGISTER for Rushing at Registration Desk
first f1loor Michigan Union

11

Students who wish to worship at Temple Beth El on
the High Holy Days are cordially invited to write
for cards of admission. Home hospitality will also

September 26-October 4,

2-5

P.M. week days

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