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September 16, 1960 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRYD)

CAMPBELL REPORTS:
State Voting Laws, Ball(
Influence U.S. Elections

1960-1961
STUDENT DIRECTORY

State laws governing the voting
franchise and the physical form
of the ballot itself both have a
significant effect on the American
elections, Angus Campbell, Direc-
tor of the University Survey Re-
search Center reported to the In-
ternational Political Science As-
sociation recently.
Campbell noted that in more
than half of the states the voter
may resolve a complicated series
Iallis Talks

On Soviet

All Students who did not include their
Ann Arbor telephone number and ad-
dress on their registration card may
be placed in the Directory by calling
the Student Publication Building be-
tween 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M.Num-
bers will not be accepted after Friday,

Both in industry and agricul-
ture, Khrushchev has decentraliz-
ed state control of the Russian
economy while bringing it under
tighter control of the Communist
Party, a University professor said
Saturday.
"Recent reorganizations in
Soviet industry ... and in ag-
riculture . . . can be view as parts
of a general trend since the death
of Stalin," Prof. William Ballis
of the political science depart-
ment told the American Political
Science Association.
The establishment of regional
economic councils and elimination
of the machine , tractor stations
and equalization of peasants' in-
come were specific points that
Prof. Ballis noted in this trend.
Legal restraints on arbitrary
arrest, decentralization of the
police in some phases and at-
tempts to build up local respon-
sibility for development of a pro-
per "Soviet man" are further,
indications of this trend.
"Under the Soviet system of the
control of the state apparatus by
I the Party, the Communist Party
remains dominant, centralized,
and all pervasive.""

of political decisions by simply
voting the straight party ticket.
Approximately twenty per cent
more voters cast straight tickets
when it's this easy.
"The form of the ballot has no
influence on strong party ties,"
Campbell said, but "among those
with only weak or no partisan ties,
straight tickets were cast from
25 to 60 per cent more often.
"The individual states vary
greatly in the severity of the qual-
ifications placed on voting."
In the North, these restrictions
have little or nothing to do with
the size of the voter turnout.
In the South. where the election
laws are generally more restrictive,
only a quarter say they vote in all
presidential elections, and Negroes
vote in a lower percentage than
whites, who vote almost in the
same proportion as in the North.
-Informal, extra-legal barrier-
not state legislation-account for
a sizeable part of the ,low turnout
of Negro voters," Campbell com-
-mented.
Brother Plan
Set by Union
A group luncheon, football
games, and participation in the
World's Fair are among the
Union's plans for its International
Brother Program.
Through the program each in-
iterested foreign student is given
a good friend or "brother" who is
an American student at the Uni-
versity.
Its aim is to form close, lasting
friendships between Americans
and foreign students, to help stu-
dents to learn quickly about every-
day life in a large university com-

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step ahead of
fashion.
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SATISFACTION
Everything they sell is backed by their rep-
utation. They're anxious for my complete
satisfaction and go out of their way to assure
it. I like that assurance.
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for years as well as
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From time to time, I've re-
quested various extra
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