100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 20, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Successes

Cited

"Dulles was not liked so much,
especially because of his treat-
ment of the Suez crisis. He was a
little too dogmatic in his views,
but Eisenhower was liked despite
Dulles' foreign policy," Lee said.
Less Agreement
"However, there was probably
less close agreement between the
United States and Britain under
the administration than there had
been previously, especially about
Red China."
The maintenance of peace in the
face of trying circumstances, which
Thomas termed "no insignificant
feat," was one of the great ac-
complishments, Prof. Clare E.

s with Ike,
Transition

Griffin of the business adminis-
tration school said.
"We have had good economic
growth in this period and I think
that the government has done as
good a job as could reasonably
be expected in checking inflation
and in handling periods of re-
cession."
Prof. Griffin said that recessions
are part of the business cycle and
cannot be prevented by govern-
ment action, and he praised Eisen-
hower's "courage" in handling the
1957-58 recession the way he did.
"The course that the economy
traces out in any period is deter-
mined by the consumers and by
business, as well as the govern-
ment," Prof. Paul. W. McCracken
said.
Budget Increasing
He explained that the budget
has been increasing about as
rapidly as the national income
during the past five years, but the
question of whether the adminis-
tration was too stern in budget
policy remains to be answered.
"The price level went up sig-
nificantly, which was not helpful
to the balance of payments prob-
lem," Prof. McCracken said. The
recent visibility. which the ad-
ministration has given to this
problem indicates at least a con-
cern for the nation's economic
problems.
He'bmentioned that "the Presi-
dent has repeatedly emphasized
the importance of increasing un-
employment benefits, and social
security has been liberalized un-
der his administration, taking
more people into its program."
Increased School Aid
In addition to social security,
Prof. George L. Grassmuck of the
political science department point-
ed to the increased construction of
clasrooms as evidence of the ad-
ministration's concern for domes-
tic progress.
He also cited a one-third in-
crease in the wages of manufac-
turing workers, an increase of
one-fourth in per capita disposible
income and a large gain in the
percentage of residents owing their
own homes.
"These dollar increases are not
due to inflation alone. From 1953
through 1960, the cost of living
went up 16 per cent. During the
period from 1946 through 1952
the rise was 48 per cent," Grass-
muck said.
Space Progress
"We did almost nothing in space
until 1952. Since then we have
pushed forward at the maximum
possible speed. We have 28 satel-
lites In orbit, and the Russians
only have eight."
Although Prof. Stokes praised
the "relaxation of internal politi-
cal strife," he said that Eisen-
hower should have publicly ap-
proved the 1954 Supreme Court
decision on civil rights.
"I feel that since the court
made a unanimous decision which
the lower judiciary in the South
was ready to implement, the Pre-
sident could have helped had he
given his moral backing."
FCC To Permit
Space TV Project
WASHINGTON 0P -The gov-
ernment .told the American Tele-
phone and Telegraph Co. yester-
day to go ahead with its plan to
communicate with space satellites
with voice and television signals
-but on an experimental basis
only.
The earth-space communica-
tions research project was approv-
ed by the Communications Com-
mission only until Jan. 1, 1962.

Cubans Reveal Captur
HAVANA AO')-Fidel Castro's
government yesterday greeted the the bare fact that it occurred, and would be a major attack f
incoming Kennedy administration were trying to find out details. United States.
with a triumphant announcement Rely on Swiss The, mobilization alert i
that six "yankee invaders" were United States authorities have uled to end today, simu
captured sailing into Havana har- to rely on the Swiss embassy for wth what the Cuban gov
bor Jan. 7. such information because all calls "Eisenhower's warmc
American government representa- regime."
The announcement said they tives were withdrawn from Cuba Decrees, ranging from
came from an anti-Castro train- following the Jan. 3 break in rela- harassing to possibly se:
ing camp in Florida and got lost tions. The Swiss agreed to handle effect, were approved in a
on the way to join rebels in Pinar United States affairs during the cabinet session.
Del Rio province. The adventurers break. Work Permits
were handed over yesterday tora Not a shot was fired by any of Four thousand Cuban
La Cabana- fortress military tri- the "invasion guards" in Havana whourwtorknCuat ne
bunal which can sentence -them to te"naingad"mHvn who work at the United
buahiharbor as a Cuban naval patrol naval base at Guantanaj
In Washington, State Depart- captured a-tiny band of Americans were ordered to obtain
ment officials said they knew attempting to enter Jan. 7. work permits which re
nothing about the affair except An official announcement said a declaration of income.

WASHINGTON (J')-A group of
Louisiana businessmen were charg-
ed by Atty. Gen. William P. Rog-
ers yesterday of intimidating and
coercing a Negro because he com-
plained about voting rights to the
Federal government.
Rogers announced that a suit
to halt alleged discrimination was
filed against 11 individuals and 11
corporations in United States dis-
trict court at Shreveport, La.
The complaint says economic
coercion has been inflicted on Jo-
seph Atlas, a farmer in Lake Prov-
idence, East Carroll Parish, La.
Atlas had complained to the
Civil Rights Commission about
what he called his unsuccessful ef-
forts to register as a voter. The
hearing was held at New Orleans
Sept. 28-29.
Most of the defendants were de-
scribed as cotton ginners. Rogers
said that all of them have refus-
ed to gin cotton for Atlas since he
testified.

r

33RD AND 34TH-President Dwight D. Eisenhower, 33rd President, and President-elect John F.
Kennedy, who will be the 34th President, confer on the transfer of the administration from the Re-
publicans to the Democrats today. Their meeting, the second since Kennedy's election, was held yes-
terday at the White House. Kennedy later conferred with Gen. Lyman L. Lemnitzer, the nation's
top army man, on the President's role as commander-in-chief of the armed forces.

Committee Approves Bowles

over Communist China "will prove
to be mistaken." "I think the sit-
uation is confusing. I don't think,
anybody knows what's going onj
in Moscow and Peiping. I think
Russia has a bear by the tail in
China."
'Big Problem'
Quemoy and Matsu--"I'd like
to explore this as little as possi-
ble. The President has a big prob-
lem here. I don't want to make
it more difficult." Bowles said the
two offshore islands should not
have become an issue in the pres-
idential campaign-"It was not
helpful."
Red China vs. India-"The real
test will not simply be the mater-
ial products the two countries
turn out but what happens to
their people in the process.'
Economic aid-"As a general
rule I think our major assistance
should go to those countries ready
to dig in and help lay good eco-
nomic foundations for develop-
mental progress, and to strength-
en a free society."

DCL v Meu.

Pre-Bargain Days Sale

VM Stereo Console Model 564 $164.95

$119.95

VM Stereo Console Separate Speaker Units
for perfect Stereo, Mod. 581 360.00 2
VM Stereo Console Model 803 199.95 1

VM Stereo Tape Recorder
Model 720 ..........
VM AM/FM Tuner ........
RCA 2 Tr. Mono
Tape Playback ........

225.00
99.95
120.00

1'

15.00
79.95
79.00
79.95
59.95

Columbia Walnut
Stereo Console .... .....
Columbia Mahogany
Stereo Console .........
Columbia Portable
Stereo AM/FM .........
Columbia Portable Stereo .. .

149.95
159.95
189.95
149.95

129.95
139.95
169.95
129.95
79.95
79.95

GOLDWYNpO
MA'IR -
A WfE.PE R.OODAO
;$~ .'M'

Gemark Recorders .......Now only

Telectro Recorders .. ..,....

99.95

Columbia 615 Trans.

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan