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January 05, 1961 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-01-05

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ants Create Math Posts,
rove Two Appointments.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETINCHE

sity regents at their]
meeting established
instructorships in
,tics department and

De-
two
the
ap-

(Continued from Page 4)

Council Tables
Parking Plans
City Council Tuesday night
tabled a proposal to revamp a
parking ordinance.
The ordinance which prohibits
parking on the "setback" between
street and building except in cer-
tain commercial districts is under
consideration as being too strin-
gent and prohibitive in terms of
the growing need.
Mayor. Cecil O. Creal also asked,
for a report on the "entire off-
street parking problem" by the
parking commission to be pre-
sented at the Jan. 12 meeting of
the council.
City Administrator Guy C. Lar-
con reported a petition to the.
Council from city firemen asking
for a 56-hour work week. Ann
Arbor firemen now work the
equivalent of a 63-hour week.
Fire Chief Ernest Heller ex-
pressed his approval of the peti-
tion as long as the force is di-
vided into three platoons. 'his
would increase efficiency as the
platoons would work as polished
teams, he said.
The council granted a Certifi-
cate of Public Service to Robert
S. McNamara, an Ann Arbor
resident and appointee to the post
of Secretary of Defense in Presi-
dent-elect John F. Kennedy's
cabinet. His community leader-
ship was cited.

proved two administrative ap-
pointments on Dec. 16, 1960.
Open to persons under 30 years
of age with a Doctorate the in-
structorships will provide a re-
duced teaching load of advanced
courses, will include a stipend of.
$6,000 for the 1961-62 academic
year, and will be renewable for
one year.
The instructorships will be
known as the T. H. Hildbrandt
instructorships in honor of Prof.
Emeritus T. H. Hildebrandt of the
mathematics department.
Prof. William C. Gibson, acting
dean of the public health school,
was .appointed associate dean of
the school on a dne-quarter time
basis, effective Jan. 1
As associate dean, Prof. Gib-
son will manage budgets and pro-
mote maximum use of University
facilities and space for teaching
and research.
He will also continue teaching
and research activities in the de-
partment of environmental health.
Prof. Robert H. Pealy has been
appointed asistant director of the
Institute of Public Administra-
tion, effective Dec. 16.
Miller To Present
Music Progrant
Prof. Richard Miller, tenor, of
the music school, will give a pub-
lic recital at 8:30 p.m. today in
Aud. A, Angell Hall. He will be
accompanied by Prof. Eugene
Bossart of the music school at
the piano. The program will in-
clude numbers by Gasparini,
Scarlatti, Fedelli, Duparc, Gretch-
aninoff, and Schumann.

Thurs., Jan. 5 at 8:30 p.m. in
Rackham Amphitheatre.

the

M. 301. Analysis Seminar: Topic:
"The Tchebycheff Problem in Approxi-
mae dIntegration." Meetinig is in 246
West Engineering, Thurs.,. Jan. 5 at
2:00 p.m.1
Applied Mathematics Seminar: Prof.
Paul Zweifel of the Nuclear Engineer-
ing Department will speak on "Solution
of the Diffusion Equation in a Mixed
Geometry," on "Thurs., Jan. 5, at 4:00
p.m. in Rm. 246 West Engineering.
Doctoral Examination for John B.
Gallini, Chemical Engineering; Thesis:
"Sterlospeciflc Polymerization of 1-Pen-
tene," Thurs., Jan. 5, 3201 East Engin-
eering, at 3 p.m. Co-chairman, J. P.
Bancahero and G. D. Williams.
Events Friday
Faculty Recital: Gustave Rosseels,
violinist, accompanied by Wallace Ber-
ry, piano, will give a sonata recital on
Fri., Jan. 6 at 8:30 p.m. In~, Aud. A.
Biological Chemistry Colloquium:
Dr. Gordon M. Tompkins, National In-
stitute of Health, will speak on "A
Molecular Basis for Steroid Hormone
Action" in M6423 Medical Science Bldg.
at 4 p.m. Fri., Jan. 6,
Doctoral Examination for Donald A-
fred Yates, Romance Languages & Lit-
eratures: Spanish; thesis: "The Argen-
tine Detective Story," Fri., Jan. 6,
East Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at
2 p.m. Chairman, E. Anderson-Imbert.
Doctoral Examination for Roger Dun-
lap, Aeronautical Engineering: Thesis:
"Effects of Cooling on Transition in
the Boundary Layer on a Hemisphere
in Simulated Hypersonic Flow," Fri.,
Jan. 6, West Council Room, Rackham
Bldg., at 2:00 p.m. Co-chairman, A. M.
Kuethe and W. W. Wilmarth.
Doctoral Examination for William
James Orr, History; thesis: "Anschluss:
German-Austrian Relations, 1933-1938",
Fri., Jan. 6, 3609 Haven Hall, at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, H. M. Ehrmann.
DOCTORAL EXAMINATION for John
Paul Rowe, Metallurgical Engineering;
thesis: "Relations between Microstruc-
ture and Creep-Rupture Properties of
Nickel-Base Alloys as Revealed by Over-
temperature Exposures," Fri., Jan. 6,
3201 East Engineering Bldg., at 3:30
p.m. Chairman, J. W. Freeman. +
Doctoral Examination for Donald Clif-
ford Weaver, Education; thesis: "Pri-
mary Aims and Appropriate Activities
of Michigan Pupblic Secondary School
Student Councils," Fri., Jan. 6, 3206
University High School, at 2:00 p.m,
Chairman, H. R. Jones.;
Doctoral Examination for MarvinI
John Bostrom, Musicology; thesis:'
"Keyboard Instruction Books of the
Eightenth Century," Fri., Jan. 6, 126
Lane Hall, at 4:00 p.m. Chairman, A. P.1
Britton.
Doctoral Examination for John DraneI
Milligan, History; thesis: "The Federal7
Fresh-Water Navy and the Opening of
the Mississippi River: Its Organization,f
Construction, and Operations throughl
the Fall of Vicksburg," Fri., Jan. 6,1
3609 Haven Hall, at 3:30 p.m. Chairman,
D. L. Dumond. t

Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS
General Mills, Minneapolis,, Minn. -
Openings for qualified grads with train-
ing/experience in the geophysical sci-
ences for positions in independent re-
search or as research assistants in Me-
chanical Division. Opportunities to con-
tinue education at Univ. of Minn.
Whirlpool Corp., St. Joseph, Mich. -
Immediate opening for recent grad as
Manager of Training and College Re-
cruiting. Work involves handling all
phases of college recruiting and the de-
velopment of training programs in all
divisions of company.,r
U. S. Army Snow Ice & Permafrost
Research, Wilmette, Ill, -- Opening forj
Tech. Editor, female, BA or MA En-
glish, with some science background.
(Note: Repr. will be on campus at'
Engrg. Placement Jan. 11.)
Mead Johnson Co., Zeeland, Mich. -
Opportunity for experienced graduate
engineer as Assistant Plant 'Engineer
who would directly supervise,4 fore-
men involved in all phases of plant
maintenance.
Newspaper, Detroit vicinity -Imme-
diate opening for Copy Reader/Copy
Editor) male, BA in English, with some
newspaper or publications experience
preferred.
EManagement Consulting Firm in the
East-Desire college grad with at least
8-10 yrs. of creative writing experience
in diversified fields including business
& industry for senior position as Crea-
tive Copy Writer, assisting Bales Man-
ager of company.
District Court of Iowa, Hampton,
Iowa-Looking for college grad, male,
to do juvenile probation work, either
with or without experience. Should
have training in related fields.
Kalamazoo County Juvenile Court,
Kalamazoo, Mich. - Several openings
for position of Juvenile Court Proba-
tion Officer, entailing the handling
of delinquency, neglect and adoption
caseloads. Comprehensive in-service
training program.
Please contact Bureau of Appoint-
ments, Room 4021 Admin. Bldg., Ext.
3371 for further information.
Beginning Mon., Jan. 9, the follow-
ing schools will have representatives
at the Bureau to interview for Febru-
ary and September 1961.
MON., JAN. 9--
East Rockwood, Mich.-3rd, 4th, 5th,
Elem. PE (Woman); Jr. HS Sci/Math.
or Elem, or Soc. Stud/Math.; Ment,
Ret.
TUES., JAN. 10-
Cleveland, O.-Elem.; Gen. Sci., Girls
PE, Home Ec., Ind. Arts, Math., Eng.,
SS.
6Detroit, Mich.--All Fields.
Madison Heights (Lamphere Schs.),
Mich.-Elementary and Secondary.
Port Huron, Mich.-3rd, 6th; Jr. HS
English.
WED., JAN. 11-
Trenton, Mich. (Bates Elem. Sch.)-
5th and 6th.
Upper Montclair, N.J. (Montclair
State Colege)-Women's PE, Biology,
THURS., JAN. 12--
Inkster (Cherry Hill Sch. Dist.), Mich.
--Elementary.
FRI., JAN. 13
Kalamazoo, Mich. - Elem.; Ment.
Hdcp.. Speech Corr.; Jr. & Sr. HS
English; Jr. HS Eng./Fre., Math.,
Health/Home Ec.
Lansing, Mich.--Elezn.; HS English,
Math., Science.
SAT., JAN. 14-
San Diego, Calif.--All Fields.
MLON., JAN, 16-

Madison Heights (Lamphere Schs.),
Mich.-Elementary and Secondary,
New Baltimore (Anchor Bay Schs.),
Mich.-Elementary (1-6),
San Diego, Calif.-Same as Above.
TUES., JAN. 17--
Battle Creek, Mich.--List of vacan-
cies will follow later.
San Diego, Calif.-Same as above.
For any additional information and
appointments contact the Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Admin. Bldg., NO,
3-1511, Ext. 489.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
American Students Information Serv-
ice-Paul F. Krynicki will be at the
Summer Placement Service Fri., Jan.
6, to talk to interested students con-
cerning summer work in Europe.
U.S. Information Agency - Small
Summer Intern Program for Radio
Trainees for the voice of America.
Open to Juniors, Seniors, & Grad. stu-
dents in Cgmmunications, Journalism,
Political Science, or other related So-
cial Science fields. Applications for
exam must be FILED BY JAN. 26,
Come to the Summer Placement
Service, D528 SAB for further infor-
mation.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Non-Academic
Personnel Office Room 1020 Adminis-
tration Building, during the following
hours: Monday through Friday, 8:00
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time or temporary employees should
contact Bill Wenrich, Part-tine Em-
ployment Interviewer, at NOrmandy
3-1511, extension 2939.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Room 1020, daily.
MALE
17-Psychological subjects (hours to be
arranged).
FEMALE
1-Girl for light housework (half day
per week).
7--Psychological subjects (21 or over,
for drug experiments).
~_Organization
Baha'l Stud. Group, Jan. 5, 8 p.m.,
1421 W. Liberty. Speaker: Dr. Bagdadi,
"Prophesy."
Engineering Council, Important
Meeting, Jan. 5, 7:15 p.m., 3529 SAB.
* * e
Hillel Fdn., Hillel's building is open
as a study hall for anyone seeking
silence, Sun. through Thurs,, 7-12 p.m.
** *
Riding Club, Meeting, Dril Team and
Open Riding, Jan. 5, 6:50 p.m., WAB.
Call Lee Sonne, NO 2-3122 if you're go-
ing.
Wesley Fdn., Grad. F1wshp. Dinner,
5:30 p.m., Pine Rm.; Bishop's Co. pre-
sentation of C. E. Lewis' "The Great
Divorce," 8 p.m., 1st Meth. Church,
Sanctuary; Jan. 6.
* * *
Christian Science Org., Testimony
Meeting, Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m., Lane Hall,
Fireside Rm.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

1',

The

Michigian

1

now costs

I1

$65O

E

a

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SSTS offers you a unique way to tour Europe. All
the advantages of an organized tour without any
of the disadvantages.
HERE'S WHAT YOU GET!
Scandinavian Student Travel Service (SSTS) gives you a tailor-made tour cater-
ing to your particular needs and preferences. What could be a more ideal way to travel
through Europe than with your own friends, seeing the countries, the people, the
scenery, at your own pace. The SSTS way lets you stop when you like. You travel
whenever and wherever you wish. This is the only way to see Europe - intimately,
yet thoroughly, due to the help of your own personal student guide.
No longer is it necessary 'for you to be rushed through cities in large impersonal
tourist groups. SSTS is the warmest, friendliest, most enriching way to travel.
SSTS includes:,
1. An automobile o4 the latest model that is given the best service and is
guaranteed.
2. All meals and accommodations.
3. Gasoline, service charges, maintenance, and full use of the automobile.
4. Scandinavian student guide driver.
5. Sight-seeing.
6. Local guides.
7. Personal travel and health insurance.
8. Luggage insurance.
9. Collision and public liability insurance.
10. Luggage rporters.
For further information with no obligations, drop in and

7.

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