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December 15, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAY, DECEMBER 15, 1960

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

DAY, DECEMBER 15, 1980 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

r..aav .a, ..ia:s:.f
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rosh,

Sophs

Challenge

Veterans

in

Track Mee

Contest To Take Place Tonight

UNUSUAL BASEBALL DRAFT:
Two New AL Additions Stock Rosters

By DAVE GOODa
Michigan's defending Big Ten!
indoor champions knock the lid
off the 1961 track season tonight;
in an intrasquad meet in Yost
Fieldhouse.j
The freshmen and sophomores
take on the juniors and seniors
and should make their presence
felt against the upperclassmen.
Left . virtually untouched by
graduation losses, the Wolverines
will appear almost in full force
tonight with the notable excep-
tions of high jumper Steve Wil-
liams and sprinter Tom Robinson.
Williams Second
Williams who placed second in
the Big Ten indoor meet last'

year and then won the outdoor
title, will not jump in this meet
because of exams.
Robinson, holder of the Big Ten
300-yard dash record of :30.0 and,
co-holder of the 60-yard mark
of :06.1, has been on tour in
Europe and Africa and will join
the team next semester.
Backing up Williams m the high
jump will be Dick Cephas, one
of the most versatile trackmen in
years at Michigan; sophomore
Jerry Gerich and freshman Al
Ammerman.
Cephas has finished In ties for
third, fourth and fifth in three
Big Ten meets over the last two
years, but has a bruised heel and

- S
Once Again - The Famous TCE
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s the abuloustour that includes m any unifue featur s e .
livhe severl days with a French family - tranet *
abroad special cultural events, eveningcept onsn meet
visits to. unusual places,se
students from rat verl the .ooo Ca
TraveloBy DeluxeoMot Coach
s o 55 Days in Europe $649 *" cAL
Transatlantic Transportation Available
TRAVEL & CULTURAL EXCHANGE, INC.
550 Fifth Ave. + New York 36, N. Y. * Cl 5-0594
D __

may not be able to go all out. Am-
merman has been installed as the
favorite and Gerich should place
high.
The 60-yard dash could go to al-
most anyone in Robinson's ab-
sence. Freshman Mac Hunter is
a good bet to win, but John Gregg,
hurt last year; finished second
and fourth in the short sprints
both indoors and outdoors two
years ago and should be a serious
threat.
McRae Not in Highs
Bennie McRae, indoor low hurdle
champ and co-holder of the Big
Ten record at :07.8, will probably
not compete in the 85-yard highs.
Charlie Peltz and Dick Thelwell
should lead the field.
In the 65-yard lows, Cephas and
McRae will have it all to them-
selves. This could be the best race
of, the night, because Cephas
finished second to McRae in the
Big Ten indoor lows and also cop-
ped second in the outdoor lows
when McRae was hurt.
The 440 could shape up as a
wide-open four-man race among
Hilton Nicholson; Bryan Gibson,
third in both Conference indoor
meets over the last two years;
soph Carter Reese and freshman
Dorr Casto.
Favorite Wally Schafer, Frank
Geist, Marsh Dickerson and soph
Charlie Aquino should fight it
out in the 880, with Hank Lenox

BQSTON (A) - Eli +Grba, Ed
Sadawski, Eddie Yost and Willie
Tasby were the top four players
picked by the new Washington
and Los Angeles clubs yesterday
as, the American League expanded
to 10-stocked clubs in an unpre-
cedented $4,325,000 draft of talent.
Each of the two clubs had to
chose 28 players at $75,000 each
from a reservoir of 120, contribut-
ed by the eight established mem-
bers of the circuit. Fifteen players
on each of the eight rosters were
placed in the pool. No club lost
more than seven.
Washington also drafted three
rookies at $25,000 each. Los
Angeles took two.
Haney Won Tosses
General Manager Fred Haney
of the Angels, who won the toss for
first pick in three of the four
categories-pitchers, cathers, in-
fielders and outfielders-selected
pitcher Grba of New York, catcher
Sadowski of Boston and third
baseman Yost of Detroit as his'
three top picks. Among the out-
fielders, in which he got second
pick, he choose Bob Cerv of the
Yankees.
Ed Doherty, General Manager
of the new Senators, chose out-
fielder Tasby of Boston as his
first pick. His first selection in
the other categories were Bobby
Shantz, pitcher from the Yankees;
Dutch Dotterer, catcher from
I-M
Huber won the I-M residence
halls swimming championship
last night, defeating Reeves, 35-
24. It was the third I-M crown
won by Huber in a week.
Also, the Drifters won the
Independent Paddleball crown,
2-1, over Evans Scholars.

Kansas City, and Coot Veal, short-
stop from Detroit.
Other 'Names'
Other established players chosen
by the Angels were pitchers Duke
Maas, New York; Truman Cleven-
ger, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and
Ned Garver, Kansas City; Catcher
Bob (Red) Wilson, Cleveland; in-
fielders Ted Kluszewski, Chicago;

Ken Aspromonte, Cleveland; and
Ken Hamlin, Kansas City.
Washington chose pitchers Dave
Sisler and Pete Burnside, Detroit;
Dick Donovan, Chicago; Tom
Sturdivant, Boston; 'cather Pete
Daley, Kansas City; infielders
Dale Long, New York, and Billy
Klaus, Baltimore.

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE.
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF.PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

.:

I

VERSATILE TRACKMAN - Dick Cephas, Michigan runner,
hurdler, and jumper, has an intent look on his face as he flies
down the track. He will be in action tonight at the big Intra-
squad meet.

I

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ESTABLiSHED 1927
S ewon .4' ee T
CrnetC ::::. troter3
1119 SOUTH UNIVERSITY ANN ARBORo
a ick)" iml~aiammaamaami ii -a -maaeaaeaas aaesaa

and frosh Levi Hardwick behind
them.
The one- and two-mile races
should be interesting also. Ergas
Leps, who was third indoors and
Big Ten champ outdoors last year,
can probably win pretty much as
he chooses.
Two freshmen, Frank Carissimi
and Dave Hayes, could be very
close, "depending," in the words
of Assistant Coach Elmer Swan-
son, "on how hard Leps wants
to go."
Martin Pressed
Dave Martin, who has placed as
high as second in the outdoor two
mile, should get good competition
from Jim Wyman, sixth in the
outdoor last year, and freshman
Chris Murray.
In the shot put, Michigan will
have a good one-two punch in
Ray Locke and Terry Trevarthen.
They were second and third, re-
spectively, in last year's indoor
meet and Locke came through to'
win the event outdoors. Fresh-
man 'putter' Roger Schmitt should
finish high up also.
The broad jump should belong to
Les Bird, if he is in shape to
compete. In his sophomore year,
Bird won the broad jump indoors
and finished second to teammate
Lou Williams outdoors.
Last year, he was able to place
only third and fourth, largely

because of a leg injury. Bird, how-
ever, has promising jumpers be-
hind him in Doug Niles and Thel-
well. Jack-of-all-trades Cephas
may compete later in the season.
In the pole vault, Michigan lacks
a proven veteran. The event should
go up for grabs among soph Steve
Overton and freshmen George
Wade, Jerry Wright and Ed Hink-
son.
In the mile relay, three varsity
units may find a freshman team of
Casto, Hayes Hunter and John
Davis hard to handle. Leps, Cephas
and Gregg will anchor the varsity
fotirsomes against Hunter on the
freshman team.

January 23 to February 2, 1961
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there is
no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict is
resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Class* Time of Examination
(at 8 Thursday, January 26 9-12
(at 9 Monday, January 30 9-12
(at 10 Wednesday, February 1 9-12
(at 11 Tuesday, January 24 9-12
MONDAY (at 12 Tuesday, January 24 2-5
(at 1 - Tuesday, January 24 2-5
(at 2 Monday, January 23 9-12
(at 3 Saturday, January 28 2-5
(at 4 Monday, January 23 2-5

ui "
O (Author of "I Was a Teen-age Dwarf", "The Many
Loves of Dobie Gillis", eic )

I

I

(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at' 11
TUESDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 4
* Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 31
Thursday, February 2
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, February 2 .
Thursday, February 2
Friday, January 27
Wednesday, February 1
Wednesday, January 25
half hour will be scheduled

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
at the

.

DECK THE HALLS

A

!!; :::'? : ',. trh :.s- ,F n-.";rj-+tca; _~ .,,,nc; ",:r~ ., sx:^: *. :??e'. :!YT+ : ^' ,, , ;,n',','t= ex;,^:r,, .n, t,^'rr+(.r ,,s+_'rr ! ,irn .,, . s, t;e^'rr tz'n+ ,, ,s ' nr~rf= lE:.^ ''!'t:''E?7

I

The time has come to make out our Christmas shopping lists,
for Christmas will be upon us quicker than you can say Jack
Robinson. (Have you ever wondered, incidentally, about the
origin of this interesting phrase "Quicker than you can say
Jack Robinson"? Well sir, the original phrase was French-
"Plhs trite que de dire ,Jacques Robespierre." Jack Robinson is,
as everyone knows, an anglicization of Jacques Robespierre who
was, as everyone knows, the famous figure from the French
Revolution who, as everyone knows, got murdered in his bath
by Danton, Murat, Caligula, and Aaron Burr.
(The reason people started saying "Quicker than you can say
Jacques Robespierre (or Jack Robinson as he is called in English-
speaking countries)" is quite an interesting little story. It seems
that Robespierre's wife, Georges Sand, got word of the plot to
murder her husband in his bath. All she had to do to save his
life was call his name and warn him. But, alas, quicker than
she could say Ja cques Robespierre, she received a telegram from
her old friend Frederic Chopin who was down in Majorca setting
lyrics to his immortal "Warsaw Concerto." Chopin said he
needed Georges Sand's help desperately because he could not
find a rhyme for "Warsaw." Naturally, Georges Sand could not
refuse such an urgent request.
(Well sir, Georges Sand went traipsing off to Majorca, but
before sheleft she told her little daughter Walter that some bad
men were coming to murder daddy in his bath, and she in-
structed Walter to shout Robespierre's name when the bad men
arrived. But Walter, alas, had been sea-bathing that morning
on the Riviera, and she had come home loaded with sea shells
and salt water taffy, and when the bad men came to murder
Robespierre, Walter, alas, was chewing a big wad of salt water
taffy and could not get her mouth open in time to shout a
warning. Robespierre, alas, was murdered quicker than you
could shout Jacques Robespierre (or Jack Robinson as he is
called in the English-speaking countries).
(There is, I am pleased to report, one small note of cheer in
this grisly tale. When Georges Sand got to Majorca where
Chopin was setting lyrics to his immortal "Warsaw Concerto,"
she was happily able to help him find a rhyme for "Warsaw,'"
as everyone knows who has heard those haunting lyrics:
In the fair town of Warsaw,
Which Napoleon's horse saw,
Singing cockles and muSsels, alie alice o!)

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201 Wednesday, February 1
Business Administration 150 Monday, January 23
Business Administration 180 Thursday, February 2
Finance 101 Friday, January 27
Finance 110 Monday, January 30
Finance 201 Monday, January 23
Ind. Relations 100, 200 Friday, January 27
Ind. Relations 150 Thursday, January 26
Insurance 170 Tuesday, January 31
Insurance 172 Saturday, January 28
Management 110 Wednesday, January 25
Management 111 Thursday, January 26
Marketing 100, 101, 200, Tuesday, January 24
201, 210
Marketing 211 Monday, January 30
Marketing 212 Monday, January 23
Statistics 100, 150, 200 Monday, January 23

!i.

,

2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

1,

I

Ir

COLLEGE
C.E. 53
Eng. Graphics 1(A)
Eng. Graphics 1(B)
Eng. Graphics 2, 4
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
English 11

OF ENGINEERING
Friday, January 27
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 31
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23-
Monday, January 30
Wednesday, January 25

t.

I

I

LITERATURE, SC
Botany 1, 2
Chemistry 3. SE, 15, 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Economics 71, '72
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 3. 11, 12,
21, 22, 31, 32
French 61, 62
Geology 11
Geography 1
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 21, 22 .
Physics 53
Pol. Science 11
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Sociology 60'
Spanish 1, 2, 3, 21, 22, 31, 32

IENCE, AND THE ARTS
Monday, January 23
Wednesday, February 1
Friday, January 27
Wednesday, February 1
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Wednesday, January 25
Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 31
Friday, January 27
Thursday, January 26
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 30
Thursday, January 26
Thursday, February 2
Friday, January 27

2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

[

d

Yrr6

But I digress.
W were speaking of Christmas gifts. What we all strive to do
at Christmas is, of course, to find unusual, offbeat, different
gifts for our friends. May I suggest then a carton of Marlboro
Cigarettes?
What? You are astonished? You had not thought of Marlboros
as unusual, offbeat, different? You had regarded them as familiar,
reliable smokes whose excellence varied not one jot or tittle
WL'-~ - - r +n - ,.9

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between Decem-
ber 5 and 16.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of

I

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