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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 14, 1960 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICI

'r A

AW*

WElDN

International Center Progresses in Suggested Areas

Gay Mobiles
Give League
Light Accent

LSA Steering Committee
Selects Two New Members

the board of governors of the
Center now, and one or two have
been on it since the SGC study
recommended it, he said. They are
nominated by the International
Students' Association.
Pleased
"We are pleased to have them
on the board, and believe that
they have helped to improve co-
ordination and communication be-
tween the Center and other cam-
pus activities," Prof. Davis said.
Since Vice-President Lewis is
the adminiistrative superior over
the Center,. there are "interlock-
ing relationships," Prof. Davis
said. He and Mrs. Kathleen M.
Mead, the Center's administrative
assistant in charge of housing,
both said they work closely ith
Prof. Peter A. Ostaf in, assistant
in Lewis's office.
Mrs. Mead pointed out that
there is less trouble with discrimi-
nation against foreign students
today, and said this may be due
to the opening of a number of
University apartments, which pro-
vide more living space,
Grateful
Prof. Davis is "grateful for the
work done by Vice-President Lew-
is's office, which sets up housing
criteria and eliminates discrimina-
tion by enforcing open listing of
rooming facilities," he said.
Mrs. Mead also said that the
Human Relations Board formed a
committee to check housing for
her office two years ago, which
also checked discrimination.
"We would like to see an im-1

provement in the mores of the
community," said Prof. Davis,
"but our problem is fitting the
foreign student into existing com-
munity mores. We won't make test
cases of our foreign students," he
said.
Primary Concern
"Our primary concern is not
uplift of the community, but pro-
visions of adequate housing," he
added. "We are also encouraging
some of the nationality clubs to
teach their members how to be
good tenants," he said.
Mrs. Mead spotlighted a prob-
lem area in the need for proper
kitchen facilities for foreign stu-
dents. Many of these students are
vegetarians, she noted, and cannot
get proper food in the University
cafeterias. The problem is more
difficult because the city has tak-
en away the community kitchens,
she said.
Little change has been made in
the use of facilities for advising
Americans who want to study
Hatchers To Hold
Open House Today
University President Harlan
Hatcher and Mrs. Hatcher will
hold an open house for students
from 4 to 6 p.m. today at their
home, David Parsons, '63E, in
charge of coordinating the pro-
gram, said. This is their annual
Christmas Open House and vocal
entertainment wil be provided by
the Pserfs.

abroad, although Prof. Davis said
the program has been strength-
ened since W. Arthur Milne, Jr.,
one of the Center's ' associate
counselors, has taken it over.
Center Competent
Since both he and Milne have
visited universities in most of Asia1
and Europe, as well as some Lat-
in American countries, Prof. Da-
vis said that he thought the,
Center was competent to advise
Americans and said he had a good
set of files on foreign study.
"We haven't been aggressive in
promoting this service due to the
lack of staff," he said. "We don't{
want to generate too much re-
sponse, because we would be
swamped."
The Center carries on its pro-
gram with foreign visitors in the
same way it did two years ago.
"We are doing a good job in this
area," Prof. Davis said. The center
arranges local housing, appoint-
ments and a program for these
visitors, he noted. interested peo-
ple can arrange appointments with
the visitors through the Center.
There were 300 foreign visitors last
year at the Center. .
The program with the wives of
foreign students has expanded a
great deal in the past two years.
The International Neighbors, a
group of Ann Arbor women, has
organized an extensive program
of visiting in homes, Internation-
al Days, clothing and equipment
exchange, conversation groups,
and other activities .for the wom-
en.

Patrons and passers-by of the
Michigan League cafeteria enjoy a
sparkling array of holiday mobiles
designed and constructed by
League employees at their own
time and expense.
The mobiles are divided into
three categories. Thirty-nine are
entirely original and were con-
structed out of wires, hangers, and
various other materials according
to the ideas of League employes.
Twenty of the mobiles have a
cardboard spiral as a base with
original centerpieces. Nine are
"cage-mobiles," constructed of
colored yarn stretched across a
wooden box-kite type frame.
Santas
Gaily colored birds, Santa fig-
ures, lights and feathers peer
cheerfully from the cages. One
mobile is hung from each light
fixture in the cafeteria, and the
original mobiles were awarded
prizes on the basis of the creativi-
ty and ingenuity they display.
Cafeteria supervisor May Gross-
man pointed out that all the dec-
orations had to be made of non-
flammable substances, which se-
verely limited the variety of con-
struction materials.
With the exception of cardboard
and wooden frames, which were
sprayed to make them inflam-
mable, use of paper, ribbons and
other combustible decorations was
kept to an absolute minimum.
Trees at Union
Christmas decorations at the
Michigan Union include brightly
lit Christmas trees in the main
dining room, the cafeteria, the
lobby and the roof over the North
entrance.
Miriam G. Dyer, food produc-
tion supervisor of the Union, said
members of her staff provided
decorations for cafeteria and
snack bar counters.
The decorations include a set
of white bells with silver trim,
three shocking pink Christmas
trees 8 inches tall arranged in a
group, and a nodding Santa Claus.

The literary college steering
committee has chosen two new
members, Melvin Moss, '63, and'
Joanne Steiner, '63, chairman'
James Seder, '61, announced last
night.
He said he regreted that only
two out of the 27 students peti-
tioning were able to be chosen,'
since many more of them were
sufficiently qualified, but con-
siderations of numbers prevented
the committee from choosing more.
than two of them.
The steering committee is a

student unit of the literary college
which discusses problems and ideas
concerned with the academic side
of the literary college, including
the curriculum, teaching, cheating
and similar facets of the college.
Proposals that have come from
the committee to literary college
administrators in recent months
have included two ror the institu-
tion of comprehensive examina-
tions for seniors in their major
subjects and for the creation of 'a
University junior year abroad pro-
gram.

N

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKIAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 23 to February 2, 1961
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there is
no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict is
resolved by the class which. conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination. -
REGULAR SCHEDULE
Time of Class* Time of Examination
(at 8 Thursday, January 26 9-12
(at 9 Monday, January 30 9-12
(at 10 Wednesday, February 1 9-12
(at 11 Tuesday, January 24 9-12
MONDAY (at 12 Tuesday, January 24 2-5
(at 1 Tuesday, January 24 2-5
(at 2 Monday, January 23 9-12
(at 3 Saturday, January 28 2-5
(at 4 Monday, January 23 2-5
(at 8 Saturday,- January 28 9-12
(at 9 Tuesday, January 31 9-12
(at 10 Thursday, February 2 9-12
(at 11 Wednesday, January 25 9-12
TUESDAY (at 12 Thursday, February 2 2-5
(at 1 Thursday, February 2 2-5
(at 2 Friday, January 27 9-12
(at 3 Wednesday, February 1 2-5
(at 4 Wednesday, January 25 2-5
* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled at the
preceding hour.

'

'1

(Continued from Page 4)
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Room 1020, daily.
MALE
20--Psychological subjects (hours to be
arranged) .
1--Experienced camera repair work (2
hours per day, plus all day Sat)
1-Bacteriology major (10-15 hours per
week)
1--Electrical Engineer -- 3, average
20 hours per week-Jr. Sr. or Grad.)
1-Salesman - Graduate student
(commission basis)
2-Meal jobs.
FENIALE
2-Waitresses (3-4 evenings per week).
1-Technical typists (15-20 hours per
week).
1-Steno-typist (8-12 hours per week).

10-Psychological subjects (21 or over,
for drug experiments).
3-Girls for light housework (hours
to be arranged).
Placement Notices
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Illinois Power Co., Decatur, II.-Sen-
iors & grads.gfor 26 week Engineering
TRAINING Program. M.E.'s to serve as
Results Engineers in 1 of 4 major
power plants, and E.E.'s to work in
Elect. Eng. Dept. or Elect.tOperations
Dept. in Decatur Headquarters office.
The Trane Company, LaCrosse, Wis.-
Technical Sales Trainees for Grad.
Engrs.-6 mos. of specialized training.
Trainees - Packaged & Residential
Equip., for Grad. Engr. or Science ma-
jors. Assigned to one of 10 field sales
offices located throughout the U.S.
Goodyear Aircraft, Litchfield Park,
Ariz.-Theoretical & Experimental Phys-
icists (Ph.D.), Sr. Electronic Engr.
(Ph.D.), Sr. Development Engr. (E.E. or

Physics), for work in Applied Research.
Development Engineers-Advanced de-
gree in E.E. preferred. Some B.S.E.E.
openings.
Sun Oil Co., Phila.-Sales & Manage-
ment TRAINING PROGRAM for college
men; B.B.A. or B.A.-Liberal Arts,
Econ. or Marketing, with 1-2 yrs. Sales
or related experience preferred for Mar-
keting Dep't. assignments. Eastern,
Midwest, Southeastern or Canadian ter-
ritories.
Please contact Bureau of Appoint-
ments, Room 4021, Admin. Bldg., Ext.
3371, for further information.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
Detroit Civil Service-Openings for
men & wOMEN Detroit residents as
camp counsellors in municipally oper-
ated summer camp. Would prefer 2 yrs.
college, with specialization in phys.
educ., music, or arts, and some coun-
seling exper. Filing period: Dec. 5-21.
Inquire af fSAB, Rm. D-528.

11

, , -

-I

Organization
Notices

I

II

Alpha Phi Omega, Active Meeting,
Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rm. 3K.
* * *
German Club, Coffee Hour, Dec. 14,
3:30-5 p.m., 4072 FB.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Fiesta de Na-
vidad - Reunion. Pinata, programa,
premios, bale, refrescos, Dec. 14, 8 p.m.,
3050 FB,
* * *
Newman Club, Explanation of the
Mass-in Lower Chapel. 7:55 p.m.: St.
Mary's; Carolling Party, 8 p.m., 331
Thompson; Dec. 14.
* * *
Nursing School Choir, Concert for pa-
tients &- families, Dec. 14, 7 p.m.,
Univ. Hospital Chapel. Staff & public
invited.
* * *
Lutheran Stud. Assoc., Intern'tI. Stu-
dent UN Panel on Peace (students
from Germany, India, Japan, Finland,
Puerto Rico & America), Dec. 14, 7
p.m., Hill & Forest Ave.
Wesley Fdn., Graduate Fellowship
Supper. Dec. 15, 5:30 p.m.. 1st Meth,
Church, Pine Rm. Reservations, NO
8-6881 by Wed., 5 p.m.
Folklore Soc., Xmas-Chanikkak Sing,
Dec. 15, 8:30 p.m., Angell, Aud. A. In-
formal Folksing, Bring instruments.
Everyone welcome,
intern'tl. Folk Dancers, Meeting,
Dancing, Dec. 14, 8 p.m., Lane Hall.
Lutheran Stud. Assoc., Carolling &
Xmas Party, Dec. 14, 7:15 p.m. Carolling,
8-11 p.m. Party, Hill & S. Forest.
Riding Club, Drill Team Meets, Dec.
15, 6:50 p.m., WAB.

50,000 MILES
City Auto Sales will give with every purchase of a 61 Volkswagen, 61
Hillman Sunbeam Alpine, a 50,000 mile guarantee policy. Big selection
of models, colors in true economy cars.
IMMEDIATE DELIVERY - trade or terms
CITY AUTO SALES Inc.
Take U.S. 112 to 21730 Michigan Ave., W. Dearborn
Phone: CRestwood 8-8050
AIRLINE STEWARDESSES
UNITED AIR LINES
Many of you will soon be finishing your college studies
and will be looking for a career that is interesting, exciting
and challenging. A career as a' Mainliner Stewardess offers
just such an opportunity. You will travel the country from
Coast to Coast and meet hundreds of interesting people.
Minimum requirements are Single; height 5'2" to 5'8";
weight 138 or less according to height; age 20, not yet 27.
Contact lenses and glasses will be considered.
For more information and application, please contact:
D. WEST
Employment Manager, United Air Lines
5959 South Cicero Avenue, Chicago 38, Ill.

0th e rsiglit e send the uVy in
Ti L
9
..To say "Happy Holidays" With
Forget someone on your Christ-
mas list? Hallmark ew Year cards
are designed so you can still wish
them the best of the season.
See our complete assortment.
University
Card & .Photo
723 North University

SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

I

I

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Business Administration 150
Business Administration 180
Finance 101
Finance 110
Finance 201
Ind. Relations 100, 200
Ind. Relations 150
Insurance 170
Insurance 172'
Management 110
Management 111
Marketing 100, 101, 200,
201, 210 ,
Marketing 211
Marketing 212
Statistics 100, 150, 200
COLLEGE1
C.E. 53
Eng. Graphics 1(A)
Eng. Graphics 1(B)
Eng. Graphics 2, 4
E.E. 5
E.M. 2
English 11

Wednesday, February 1
Monday, January 23
Thursday, February 2
Friday, January 27
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23,
Friday, January 27
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 31
Saturday, January 28
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26
Tuesday, January 24
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 23"
OF ENGINEERING
Friday, January 27
Monday, January 23
Tuesday, January 31
Monday, January 30
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 30
Wednesday, January 25

2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2=5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

Rifle Club, Meeting, Dec. 14,
I p Tm., ┬▒ae

7:30

-u

p.m., Range.,
Young Democratic Club & Americans
Committed to World Responsibility, Dec.
14, 7:30 p.m., Union, Rms. 3R & S.
Speaker: U.S. Representative James G.
O'Hara fromsMich. 7th District.
D GIFT -
)
"*

K~dI.
f'w
KidsI,,., X.,."

LITERATURE, SC
Botany 1, 2,
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182, 183
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Economics 71, 72
English 23, 24,
French 1, 2, 3, 11. 12,
21, 22, 31,.32
French 61, 62
Geology 11
Geography 1,
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 21, 22
Physics 53
Pol. Science 11,
Russian 1, 2, 31, 32
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 3,121, 22, 31, 32

3

Wednesday, January 25
Saturday, January 28
Tuesday, January 31
Friday, January 27
Thursday, January 26
Monday, January 23
Monday, January 30
Thursday, January 26
Thursday, February 2
Friday, January 27

IENCE, AND THE ARTS
Monday, January 23
Wednesday, February 1
Friday, January 27
Wednesday, February 1
Wednesday, January 25
Thursday, January 26

I ..

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between Decem-
ber 5 and 16.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examination see bulletin

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