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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1960 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TT ITCHIG.AN f1T.V

tionalWords Boring?
'rohliche Weihnachten

Uban iiaRI oliday Customs

BEATRICE TEODORO v
Nell-meaning phrases of the
ias season, such as "Merry
nas and a Happy New
are rapidly becoming trite,
rn out.
:ent attempt to inject life
e annual greetings resulted
Cool Yule -and a Frantic
It was imaginative but
ved.
atest trend is toward more
and sophisticated Christ-
shes. In fact, it is preferable
ecipient doesn't understand
as bee nsaid. Readily filling
nand for foreign phrases.
Feliz Navidad
.xample, try "Feliz Navidad
pero Ano Nuevo" to your
aanish speaking friends. Or
uld , say "Boas Festas do
to those who have never
Portugal or Brazil.

Meeting acquaintances who know
nothing about German, say "Froh-
liche Weihnachten" and "Gluck-
liches Neujahr." Tell those who
don't speak Italian "Io auguro
un felice Natal."
Joyeux Noel
For very continental Christmas
cards, try printing "Meilleurs
Voeux pour un Joyeux Noel et
une Heureuse Annee."
The "season to be jolly" atmos-
phere has even spread to the mys-
terious, exotic Far East. If you
know people who can't understand
phonetic Chinese, try "shing-
nyan-kwai-le" with the proper
un-down intonation.
And to the many, many people
who don't understand Japanese,
wish them a "Kurisumasu Ome-
deto."

American Christmas traditions
are still preserved in the small
towns and rural areas of the coun-
try, exen though they have been
greatly altered or completely for-
gotten in the urban centers.
Our founding fathers chopped
down their own Christmas tree,
decorated their homes with boughs
of evergreen and bright ribbons,
and then on Christmas Eve gath-
ered in their meeting houses to
celebrate the holiday. These cus-
toms are often preserved in small
communities today.
Cut Down Tree
On the day before Christmas'
the American father in rural areas
takes his axe in hand, accompan-
ied by his young son, and trudges
to the nearby wood lot to select
the family Christmas tree.
After cutting down the chosen
tree, theyucarry it backhome to-
gether where the rest of the fam-
ily is eagerly awaiting the arrival
of the tree,
On Christmas Eve mother and
daughter bring the ornaments.
which have been stored since last'
Christmas, down from the attic.'
With mother carefully supervis-
ing, the family members all join
in the decorating of the tree.
However, in the city, father (on
the way home from the office)

chooses a tree from the neighbor-
hood lot or gas station, stuffs it
in the trunk of the family car and
brings it home.
The urban family decorates their
Christmas tree about a week be-
fore the holidays, and in the days
just before Christmas one may
drive down the city streets and
see the vari-colored lights of the
trees shining through the win-
dows.
While cutting down the tree,
father and son pick some mistle-
toe if it is on hand, but since it
usually isn't, they pick holly and
hang it around the house.
The father in the city goes to
the neighborhood gift shop, and
buys mistletoe.
In the rural areas, contests are
held to determine who has the
most elaborate and original dec-
orations. The Junior Chamber of
Commerce awards prizes to the
best decorations.
Apartments Limit Decor
Since many people in the city
live in apartments. they cannot
decorate the exterior of their
home. They are limited to putting
wreaths on their doors or Christ-
mas lights in the window.
In the suburban area, people
elaborately decorate their lawns.

The Nativity, Santa Claus sitting
in his sleigh drawn by his eight
flying reindeer and Rudolph or the
three Wise Mean bearing their
gifts from the Orient are often
seen.
In small, closely-knit communi-
ties, many of the townsfolk gather
together at the community cen-
ter or recreation hall. At some
of these social gatherings the peo-
ple dance to music provided by lo-
cal musicians; at others the peo-
ple are entertained by local tal-
ent.
Quiet Evening
Usually in the large cities, mem-
bers of the immediate family
spend a quiet evening at home
watching, baking Christmas cook-
ies and peeking cautiously at hid-
den Christmas gifts.
Parents throughout the country
unsuccessfully attempt to send
their children to bed early so that
"Santa Claus" will have time to
come. But the little ones, so ex-
cited by the prospect of Santa's
visit. find it impossible to fall
asleep, even though their parents
warn, "Santa won't come while
you're awake."
People in small towns plan far
ahead for their annual Christmas
shopping expedition to a neighbor-

ing big city. Thgere in the large
department stores they select gifts
for all those on their Christmas
shopping list.
But those who live in large
cities are more apt to search out
the small Quainte Gifte Shoppes,
hidden in the narrow side streets
of the older sections of town. Here
they fund unusual, exotic gifts
for those who have everything and
novelties for all those hard-to-
please acquaintances to whom they
owe presents.
The holiday season does not end
on December 25, but continues
through New Year's Day.
Some small town people come to
the city to celebrate the coming
of the new year. They come to see
such things as Times Square in
New York and visit the nightclubs
in the cities.
Attend Parties
Others stay to attend parties
with their neighbors and friends,
City dwellers hold wild parties
and visit many nightclubs care-
fully avoiding tourist haunts. Wild
hats and noisy horns add color to
the festivities.
With the New Year's Eve cele-
bration the holiday season draws
to a close and everyone returns
to their normal routine.

CHOP, CHOP-In the country the tree is personally chopped by
the family. In the city it is chopped "while you wait" or "pre-
chopped." At some time however, the ring of steel against re-
sistant wood and the sound of a falling tree- echoes through the
clear Christmas air.

I

I

IT LOOKS LIKE CASHMERE
AND IT FEELS LIKE CA8-.M kE"
)UR FAMOUS "DREAMSPUN" PULLOVER !
yled and tailored to rival cashmere, too, in the exqui-
e and dainty French manner. Little pointed collar and
delicate placket, with the pattern outlined in a beauti-
1 piquot stitch. So soft, so appealing, so feminine! Full.
hioned, with marvelous Garland workmanship inside
d out, as in all our "Dreamspun" fur blends. We have
sics and dressmakers for you in rich new Garland
Lors. Sizes 36 to 40.

>N':

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X

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WHAT A DIFFERENCE-A Coun

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Do your Christmas
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utry mouse's Christmas is very different from that of a city mouse. A city mouse can celebrate in a
skyscraper while all a country mouse can do is sit in the quiet country and listen for the skylark
and Santa Claus. But the country mouse can eat all the food because it is prepared beforehand
while the city mouse must wait until the night after Christmas to get what was uneaten of the
"pre-cooked Christmas dinner" out of the steel garbage cans behind the large apartment houses.

THE SNACK

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Order

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fr'm more than 100 shades...

HAMBURGERS

15c

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FRENCH FRIES

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HAKES

r,'N

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4°q
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4< Cyril Hii
f(V4 . or. i d
orMi
r Heels

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10c

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