100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 1960 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-20
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Newest Order-
Original Concept for Organizing
Day in More Economical Ways

THE TWENTY-FOUR HOUR SYSTEM:
Enjoying Life Withou

By Jean Spencer and Pat Golden

A night person should not be forced
into day living.,

NEW COL
* NEW BOC
NE W KIT
ALL KNITTING EQU
*1 0 Nickels Arcade
***************

G K aF "

ORS
)KS
JIPMENTr

"K
'K
I
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K
'K

inued from page Three
he tension created by the
or clock-directed people the
break has degenerated in-
rticular period of time dur-'
ich the individual needs a
for reasons entirely unre-
o the activity he is pursu-
e needs a coffee break sole-
ause it's 10 a.m.
ARLY, if 10 a.m. occurs in
e middle of the sleeping per-
r a person who organizes his
according to his particular
he is not going to wake up
a sound sleep to satisfy his
-break need.
e becomes interested enough
job, he may even learn to
his coffee while he works,
iminate the break entirely.
y still be measuring out his
i coffee-spoons, but at least
umber per day will be a
ble.
formity in general loses its
. If a person knows he is
ing during his best hours and
what he feels is most prof-
, he becomes less iearful
about whpt other people are do
ing at the same time. The in-
creased self-assurance of making
personal decisions and carrying
them out releases the individual
from the need to do as others do.
CONVERSELY, keeping what
are now considered unusual
hours will cease to be a status
symbol. If more people find they
work better at night, thn fewer
people will be tempted to be night
people just to be different.
The core of the plan is indi-
viduality. If everyone strives for
sincere individuality, the status
value of conformity and eccentri-
city are nil.
Another result is increased ac-
ceptance of individual difference.
Neither night nor day people can
scorn the others if they know each
person has decided upon his own
kind of life. In time, this could
lead to a generally broadened
sense of equality and mutual re-
spect for personal decisions.
One objection which has been
raised about the plan is that the
University community would be
so split that people would never
see some of their friends.
Perhaps this is a blessing in
disguise.
TAINLY A PORTION of the
divorce suits taken to court
each year may be directly attri-
butedto the unfortunate circum-
stance of a day person unwittingly
falling in love with a night person.
Organizations on campus would
also function more efficiently if
they were composed either of all
night people or all day people.
Then meetings could be held at
the time most convenient for all
participants
Fewer people would be awake
and active at any particular time
of the day or night. Each person,
during his waking hours, would
thus know a larger proportion
of the sea of faces around him.
With the resulting increase in the
feeling of belonging, students
would be less driven to form
cliques and in-groups for identifi-
cation. Social stratification, there-
fore, would be based on the much
more practicalbasis of compatible
living hours.
rFE MOST IMPORTANT impact
of the 24 hour system would
be upon the individual's strength
of character and self-reliance.

DIAMONDS - WATCHES -- WEDDING RINGS
CIRCLE PINS MICHIGAN JEWELRY
NECKLACES - CLASS RINGS
BRACELETS CHARMS
WATCH BANDS sca INDIAN JEWELRY
NORT[I UNIVERsITY JEWELERS (near IItIl A:t /olimun)
ANN ARBOR, MICEiGAN

The current system tends to
make students value certain
periods of time far less than
others, simply because they occur
between particularly significant
periods of clock-directed activity.
For instance, a clock-directed
individual may have a class com-
mitment which ends at 4 p.m. and
a dinner commitment which begins
at 6 p.m. Because he habitually
studies between 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.,
he doesn't regard the hours be-
tween 4 and 6 as potential study
time.
The person who has selected the
time period during which he func-
tions best, on the other hand, is
acutely conscious of the value of
every minute and every hour. He-
will not minimize one bloc of
time merely because the end of it
signals the start of a particularly
delegated period of activity. In-

stead, he will want even more to
use this time as efficiently as he
can.
W ITHOUT A CLOCK concept,
the student will begin to
seriously evaluate the ways in
whih he is using his precious al-
lotment of time. He will tend to
cut out unprofitable activities, and
those which he does not particu-
larly enjoy. He will prefer to spend
his leisure time doing those things
which really give him satisfaction.
Thinking about time instead of
hours will not make the student
anti-social, but it may change his
social pattern somewhat. Much of
social pressure-is tied to the feair
of hours and special time periods.
What will people think if I stay
home on Saturday night?
Granted, people who really en-
joy purely social gathering where
conversation is purely social will

W HY does a clock with no
hands mean death? What
terrible significance draws one'sl
eyes to the clock from five to
fifty times in an hour? America,
with every sweep of the second
hand, becomes more clock-direct-
ed.
The formal allotment of certain
hours for certain tasks activities
is currently valued more highly
than the achievements which may
take place in these hours. A rad-
ical realignment of values is
called for! Scheduling should fit
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS .
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

This clock should be tke symbol
of a productive life.

the individual goals-not vice-ver-
.sa. Hours should be determined
by the needs of the individual-
not in spite of them.-
ODERN society is oriented to
the eight hour work day. An
overwhelming number o% people
regard the hours between 11 p.m.
and 8 a.m. as non-functional.
After spending some time study-
ing in the early evening, most
students close their books and
turn to relaxation or sleep. Their
activities during a normal class
day are mainly passive, e.g. sit-
ting in class, in a restaurant or
in the library.
MHnce, while academics tend
to taper off around 10 p.m., the
student still possesses consider-
able physical energy and alert-
ness, so he spends the next few
hours talking. The tension pro-
duced by spending a specific bloc
of time in class and studying
makes him turn to purely recre-
ational pursuits which may ex-

tend into the early hours of the
morning.
Naturally, the student wakes up
tired, gropes through breakfast,
drags himself to early classes, and
only begins to function by 10 or
11 a.m. His*peak of efficiency
occurs between 4 and 7 p.m.
This time, however, is normal-
ly spent in a formidable proces-
sion of coffee dates, committee
meetings, culminating in a leis-
urely dinner. The vicious circle
then begins again: A set number
of hours spent pouring over
books, a period of complete re-
laxation, and a few hours of
sleep.
TfH IS monotonous pattern cre-
ates the attitude that arbi-
trarily defined blocs of time
should be spent in arbitrarily se-
lected activities. Thus the indi-
vidual is encouraged to divide his
approach to two pursuits which
should be integrated-academic
and personal development.
The student approaches his
work in terms of hours instead of
specific goals. Consequently, he
loses the incentive of goal accom-
plishment and becomes complete-
ly clock-directed.
Clock-directed people are prob-
ably the least creative citizens, al-
though for certain tasks they may
be the most efficient. Society
needs a certain number of clock-
directed people, but perhaps not
as many as are being produced
by institutes of higher education
today.
The problem, then, is to break
down the hour concept for a
greater number of people, so that
clock-direction will not be encour-
aged to such a degree.
THIS could be accomplished by
running the University on a 24
hour basis. Libraries and other
reference and study facilities
would remain open continuously.
No students would be forced to re-
main in residence halls during
specific hours of the day or night.
Residence halls would serve meals
every four hours. More evening
classes would be offered so that
the number of classes held morn-
ing, afternoon and evening was
fairly equalized.
The benefits to the individual
may beevaluated in terms of the
individual's increased productiv-
ty, indivduality, and compatibil-
ity.
The first element of the plan
is that each individual must ex-
plore his own- personality suffi-
ciently to decide when. he func-
tions best.
If a person does not know when
his most productive hours occur,
he will naturally have to do some
experimentation, Th i s might
mean that foraweek or two he
would live a totally unscheduled
life in an effort to. determine
which hours were least function-
al for him.
Jean Spencer is editorial di-
rector of The Daily. Pat
Golden is a sophomore on The
Daily majoring in far eastern
studies. They stay up all night.
They're both a little crazy.

Join the Michigan Daily
Business Staff Now!
See MARGIE or MIKE or JUDY

..a
? '
.
.

clockdiretion Sine th num
.:~
a: I +

WHEN he had found his best
time periods and developed an
informal schedule to utilize them,
the student could proceed to lead
a less exhausting yet more pro-
ductive life.
Students who found they work-
ed best during hours different
from those currently considered
normal would soon lose their
clock-direction. Since the num-

ber
task
mot
orie:
TI
nomi
reve
brea
feel
chan

====

A,

41

NO -0505

l irfr+r## ++* *k*

Make Toy Shopping easy by shopping
early at Campus Bike& Toy
FREE GIFT WRAPPINGA
campus BIKE'& 'TOY I

From the top of the New York Times
Best Seller List
I FICTION
Hawaii, Michener . . . . $6.95
Advise and Consent, Drury . $5.75
I The Leopard, Lampedusa . . $4.50
To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee . $3.95
Mistress of Meltyn, Holt . . $3.95
The Waste Makers, Packard . $4.50
Born Free, Adamson . . . $4.95
The Rise, and Fall of the'
Third Reich, Shirer . . $10.00
I Enjoy, Enjoy ! Golden . . $4.00
Baruch:The Public Years $6.00
" The Liberal Hour, Galbraith . $3.50 '
Pick up while they last-
FREE COPY of the
Christmas Present Finder
BE SURE TO.BROWSE{
I ..at
State Street at North University

539 East Liberty St.

Michigan Theatre Bldg.

R ICE'S
SmarteJt ojter- Soppe
HOSIERY -LINGERIE -ROBES -DRESSES
SPORTSWEAR
QUALITY MERCHANDISE - REASONABLY PRICED,

:/

F

(As seen in HARPERS

CO L'L
State and Libe

II

I1

PAPER-BOUND
BOOKSJ
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OV ER BECK'S

Wooly-Warm Hoods that-
go to your head"
1212 S. UNvEmrITY
NO 3-3946

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

PERSONALIZED GIFTS are flatter
to the recipient, as they show f6
MONOGRAMMED BATH TOWELS and HANDKERCHIEFS
November to assure deliversy for Christmas giving. Positively n4
November 30.
May we suggest for extra specia
Aprons, Scarfs, Tea Towels, christmas Aprons, Towels, Cloths
"Where quality has no substituion"

I

GAGE LINEN SHO

Mayn

2-0035

':

to .'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan