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November 18, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Given

Gridiron

[IS

squad of 60 University of1
higan freshmen were recom-.
nded for football numerals for
1960 season by frosh coach
n Dufek and approved by Ath-
* Director H. O. Crisler.
'he list includes 10 halfbacks,
e uarterbacks, five fullbacks;
ends, 12 tackles, 13 guards and
ecenters.
nds included were Doug Bickle,
verse City; Gerry McCants, Detroit;
ig Schmidt, Des Plaines, Ill.; Larryi
owski, Bay City; Dave Ong, Allen
k; John Youngs, Bay City; Bill
eson, Bad Axe; Dan MacLeish, De-,
t; John Yanz, Chicago; and Tom
t, Rockford, 111.
ackles were Dick Bubick, South
d, Ind.; Dick Dworsky, Portland,
Paul Woodward, Cincinnati; Jim
ey, Portland, O.; Tom Keating, Chi-
o; Fred Janke, Jackson; Bill Mich-
ritz, Chicago; Dan Striegel, Wheel-
Il; Phil Garrison, Wyandotte;
Lovel, Birmingham; DanBern-
i, Oak Park and Charles Prochas-
Southgate.
mong guards were Mitchell Garter,
oklyn, N.Y.; Dave Brich, Saginaw;
ve Kovacevich, Chicago; John Mar-
a, Monroe; John Pasch, Toledo, O.;
ve Volmer, Detroit; Bill Coplin, Ir-
, Pa.; Dave Ramsey, Niles,, 0.;
ve Kurtz, Toledo, 0.; Pom Perriello,
w Kensington, Pa.; Ron Pocorus,'
ited, Pa.; Del Nolan, Clare and Jim
wens, Monroe.
enters were Paul DeMarke, Lincoln
k; Bill Muir, Cuyahoga Falls, 0.;
n Blanchard, Sturgis; Dave Voight,
adusky, O., and Joe Sligay, Dearborn.
[alfbacks included were William
tclff, Pontiac; Bruce McLenna, Fen-
; Dick Robinson, Monroe; Harvey
apman, Farmington; Mike Vuocola,
c Haven, Pa.; Jim Locke,Biring-
m, Ala.; Mike Shirley, Dearborn;
a Kornowa, Toledo, 0.; Peter Geis,
kc Park, Ill., and Jack Gilbert, Pitts-
rgh.
quarterbacks were Frosty Evashev-
iIowa City, a.; Tom Watters, Pitts-
rgh, Pa.; Dennis Alix, Birmingham;'
n Tate, Akron, O.,. and Tom Prit-
ard, Marion, O.
ullbacks were Paul Ewing, Detroit;
yne Sparkman, Plymouth; Dan
ty, Hastings; Bill Dodd, Virden, Ill.,
d Bill Kodros, Alton, I1.

GRID SELECTIONS
Going into the final week of the Grid Picks contest, there will be
a few tight races this weekend. Not only will some of the games on
the list be close, and not only will the winner of the contest be de-
cided in a close race, but the sports staff of the Daily is putting on
a little battle of its own.
Last year at this time, the leaders were Jim Benagh and Tom
Witecki with 104-56 records. This year, Dave Andrews and Mike Gill-
man are tied for the lead with 103-57 records, with Witecki one
game behind at 102-58. The consensus last year was the same as the
leaders, with 104 correct games. This year, it is the same story, with
the consensus tied for the lead.
This is the final column of the year, and your last chance to
win two free tickets to the Michigan Theater, now showing "The
Captain's Table." Your entry may be returned to the Daily by hand
to the main office on the second floor, but it must be in by midnight
tonight to be eligible.
This week's guest selector is Terry Barr, former Michigan half-
back and defensive specialist. He is now a star halfback for the De-
troit Lions.
CONSENSUS PICKS IN CAPS (Consensus, 103-57-.644)

By TOM WEBBER
Purdue and Iowa found success
in the air against Ohio State and
beat the Buckeyes. Will Michigan
do the same?
So far this year the Michigan
passing attack has shown great
potential at times and been some-
what less spectacular at other
times.,
The biggest indication of the
sputtering attack is the low .389
completion percentage and the
seven interceptions.
Curious Fact
A curious fact about this year,
however, is that it has been the
pass in key ;situations which has
1jelped the Wolverines to a winning
season. Such occasions occurred in
thie Illinois and Indiana games.

DAVE GLINKA
... soph on the spot

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Michigan Aerial Game Ready for OSI

Michigan at OHIO STATE
MINNESOTA at Wisconsin
ILLINOIS at Northwestern
Indiana at PURDUE
Detroit at MICHIGAN STATE
IOWA at Notre Dame
Kansas at MISSOURI
COLORADO at Oklahoma St.
Nebraska at OKLAHOMA
TCU at RICE

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

ARKANSAS at Texas Tech
Florida State at AUBURN
DUKE at North Carolina
Kentucky at TENNESSEE
TULANE ,at Vanderbilt
YALE at Harvard
Penn State at PITTSBURGH
Stanford at CALIFORNIA
OREGON at Oregon State
UCLA at Southern California

IN AL MEETINGS:
Cronin Announces Plan
To Stock New Teams

The Illinois game was decided
on two pass plays. One was a dar-
ing fourth down play and the
other - the two-point conversion
play. The turning point in the
Indiana game was a long TD pass
to end Scot Maentz.
In addition, quarterback Dave-
Glinka almost pulled the Wiscon-
sin game out of the fire in the last
minute with a flurry of passes.
But on the whole the aerial show
has now supplemented the running
aatack as much as was hoped most
observers have noted. .
Complete Seven
This was largely the case with
Iowa until last week's encounter
with the Buckeyes. The Hawkeyes
are eighth in the Big Ten in for-
ward passing, but last week they
managed to complete as many
passes in one game as they had in
the seven previous ones. This was
considered to be one factor which
contributed heavily to the Iowa
win.
Purdue, boasting Bernie Allen,
one of the conference's finest quar-
terbacks, went to the air repeated-
ly and emerged with a 24-21 vic-
tory.
Last week Michigan, perhaps
giving an example of things to
come, went to the air 20 times
against Indiana. The number,
however, is not as significant as
the type which were thrown. The
six completions went for a total
of 140 yards which is a sharp
de ation from the usually short
pass patterns.
When asked about this, Coach
Bump Elliott replied, "It all de-
pends on the team that you're
playing. We thought we could

throw long against Indiana and so'
we did."
Michigan fans hope that the
Wolverines can also discover weak-
ness of this sort and exploit 'it
against the powerful Buckeyes.
The traditional Ohio State-
Michigan game is certain to pro-
vide some thrills with the un-
predictable Woody Hayes and the
Michigan mentor matching plays.
Anyway, some 83,000 lucky tick-
et holders are looking forward to
Saturday's 57th encounter in the
long series between the two
Out of Ohio State came yester-
day the news that starting right
I-M Volleyball
PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES
First Place Playoff
Phi Epsilon Kappa 4, Phi Rho Sigma 2
Second Place Playoff
Phi Delta Phi 4, Phi Chi 2
Alpha ChiSigma 4, Gamma Alpha 0
Third Place Playoff
Delta Sigma Pi 4, Delta Theta Phi I
Fourth Place Finals
Alpha Omega 4, Alpha Kappa Phi 0
FACULTY SCORES
Social Psychology 5, Zoology 1
English "B" 5,*Philosophy 1.

end Tom Perdue, who has been
a standout all season in the Buck-
eye defense, will definitely be out
of the contest.
He sustained a head injury last
week in Ohio's 35-12 loss to Iowa.
, . N
Pratice Notes
For the first time this season the
football squad went through prac-
tice without wearing any padding.
There was very little body contact
as Bump Elliott attempted to
prevent his injury list fl'om grow-
ing any longer.
In the annual"after point" con-
test held by the seniors, Paul Poul-
os booted 13 consecutive drives
through the uprights to win. John
Halstead, the regular kicker for
the Wolverines, was forced to kick
left-f ooted and split the posts on
his first try. His second attempt
failed.
Dave Raimey, the major injured
player on the team, ran well and
will see considerable action in
Saturday's game against Ohio
State, though he probably will not
be at his peak efficiency.

I1

j

NBA Standings
EASTERN DIVISION
W L Pct.I
Philadelphia 9 4 .692
Boston 6 3 .667
Syracuse 4 6 .400
New York 2 10 .1671
WESTERN DIVISION
W L Pct.1
St. Louis 9 3 .727
Detroit 6 6 .500;
Cincinnati 7 8 .467
Los Angeles 5 7 .417
Yesterday's Results
Syracuse 106, Philadelphia 105
St. Louis 112, Detroit 105
NHL Standings
W L T Pts. GFI
Montreal 10 5 3 23 68
Detroit 9 6 422 61
Chicago- 9 6 4 22 59
Toronto 8 6 4 20 55
Boston 3 96 12 46
New York 5 12 1 11 54
Yesterday's Result
Chicago 4, Boston 2

MIKE GILLMAN (Associate Sports Editor, 103-57-.644)-Mich.,
Minn., Ill., MSU, Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke,
Tenn., Tulane, Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.
DAVE ANDREWS (103-57-.644)-OSU, Minn., NW, Purdue,
MSU, Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn., Tulane,
Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore. St., UCLA.
TOM WITECKI (Sports Editor, 102-58--.638)-Mich., Minn.,
Ill., Purdue, MSU, Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., Neb., Rice, Ark., Auburn,
Duke, Tenn., Vand., Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.
BOB ROMANOFF (100-60-.625)-OSU, Wis., Ill., Purdue, MSU,
Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn., Tulane, Yale,
Penn St., Cal., Ore. St., UCLA.
FRED STEINHARDT (100-60-.625)--OSU, Minn., NW, Pur-
due, MSU, Iowa, Kansas, Colo., Okla., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn.,
Tulane, Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.
BRIAN MacCLOWRY (99-61-.619)-OSU, Minn., Ill., Purdue,
MSU, Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn., Tu-
lane, Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore. St., UCLA.
GARY GUSSIN (99-61-.619.)--OSU, Minn., Ill., Purdue, MSU,
Iowa, Mo., Cola., Neb., Rice, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn., Tulane,
Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.
HAL APPLEBAUM (Associate Sports Editor, 97-63-.606) -
Mich., Minn., Ill., Purdue, MSU, Iowa, Kansas, Colo., TCU, Ark., Au-
burn, Duke, Tenn., Tulane, Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.
CLIFF MARKS (88-72-.550)--Mich., Minn., NW, Purdue, MSU,
Iowa, Mo., Colo., Okla., TCU, Ark., Auburn, Duke, Tenn., Tulane, Yale,
Pitt., Stanford, Ore. St., UCLA.
TERRY BARR (Guest Selector, 85-75-.531)-Mich., Wis., 111,
Purdue, MSU, Iowa, Mo., Colo., Neb., Rice, Texas Tech, Auburn, Duke,
Tenn., Tulane, Yale, Pitt., Cal., Ore., UCLA.

NEW YORK (AP)-Elwood Que-
sada, administrator of the Fed-
eral Aviation Agency, was award-
ed the new Washington f ran-
chise and the Los Angeles club
went up for grabs as Hank Green-
berg dropped out of the picture
in yesterday's startling develop-
ments in the American League
expansion picture.
Joe Cronin, American League
president, announced a plan for
stocking the two new clubs in the
,10-team league with player talent
and offered to negotiate with Wal-
ter O'Malley, owner of the Los
Angeles Dodgers, for damages.
"We'll operate with 10 clubs
in 1961," said Cronin after a long
meeting which will be continued
today. "We will operate at Wash-
ington and at Los Angeles, sub-
ject to the Commissioner's clari-

fication. There are no Insur-
mountable obstacles.
Cronin spelled out a plan to
stock each new club with 28 men
from the current 40-man player
rosters of the eight league teams.
Each of the eight teams must des-
ignate a list of 15 by noon today,
seven of whom must have been
on the club's active list Aug. 31,
1960.
Before midnight, Nov. 20, each
new club must have taken 28
players, including at least 10
pitchers, two catchers, six infield-
ers and four outfielders and six
others for any desired position.
The 28 at $75,000 each will cost
$2,100,000.
Each of the eight American

ANN ARBOR RECREATION
STUDENT RATES
MODERN -AUTOMATIC

... ....... . ..

BOWLING

605 E. Huron

NO 2-0103

J

League clubs that operated in 1960
will lose seven!.men.

T.

GA . M.

GB
3q1
GB
23
3

CAFE GALERIE PRESENTS -
"The country's No. 1 balladeer"-San Francisco Chronicle.
ED McCUIDY
Nov. 19-Dec. 8 Nightly (except Monday)
First Show at 9 P.M.

I

(Thank Goodness

It's Musket)

S featuring

Friday, Nov. 18
Last Evening with ROWENA
Special Program with folk songs of many lands

AL

YOUNG.

GA
55
52
44
59
74

CAFE GALERIE
19940 Livernois UN 2-4455
NORTH OF OUTER DRIVFE

F

SUMMER TOUR IN EUROPE

~i1

TODAY at 3:00 P.M.
UNION CAFETERIA

ISA
Presents a
*LJ DANCE
TONIGHT
8:30 to 11:30
Women's Athletic Bldg.
*Square

11

with
Thurs., 3 - 5

SABBATH EVENING SERVICES

(I

11

at HILLEL Tonight..s.Nov.18-7:15P.M.
ZWERDLING-COHN CHAPEL
followed by group singing and dancing

Everyone Welcome
COME SEE KISMET

2539
Wed.

SAS
and

MUST BOOK
EARLY

m

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FOR

YOUR

DINING

PLEASURE ...

F

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EL Rio RESTAURANT
FREE DELIVERY
Also
STEAKS - CHOPS - CHICKEN
SPAGHETTI - RAVIOLI - LASAGNE
BEER and WINE-- (in or Out)
SUBMARINE SANDWICHES
Closed MondayP-
Washington Phone NO 2-9575

I

, Continental Dining
NOW OPEN 2
MinihtOdSuMNDAYS: 20 o:0PM
ENCHANTING ATMOSPHERE-- PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
EXOTIC INTERNATIONAL CUISINE
341-5 South Main -
REAR ENTRANCE Adjacent-to Municipal Parking Lot
FOR RESERVATIONS of 6 and over, please call NO 3-2701
Inquiries for BANQUET FACILITIES are welcomed.
* U* * * * * * * *

I

offers you a taste treat
of a traditional Italian dish

122 W.'

PIZZA

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and other ITALIAN SPECIALTIES
CARRY OUT & DELIVERIES

EL

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will be served daily from
12 Noon to 2 P.M. and 5 P.M. to 4 A.M.
F-LEE DELIVERY
from 5 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Expertly prepared by our special pizza pie maker and
baked in new modern ovens to give you
the "best tasting pizza in town."
TAKE-OUT SERVICE AVAILABLE

301 E. Liberty

NO 3-7363

0
LEO PING SAY: There were two big sides "pulling" oppo-
site in the election. But now, we must all "pull" together. o
Enjoy the finest
Cantonese
Food

Closed Monday

'1

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STEAK
skillfully broiled to per-
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fried onion rigs, Frencoh
fried or baked potato'
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homemade rolls and
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the Gourmet Club .. by the AAA ,. and by hundreds
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