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November 12, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

idiana Ends 'M' Home Season

t

(Continued from Page 1)
erating out of the winged-T,
sting out of the winged-T, which
ly recently replaced the single
ag, consists of Woody Moore,
arterback; Mike Lopa and Len
,rtkiewicz, halfbacks; and Jack
)1der, fullback.
LINEUPS

INDIANA
Rocco
Haas
Johnson
Miller
Dove

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

MICHIGAN
Freehan
Jobson
Poulos
Smith
Syring
Schopf
Johnson
Glinka
McRae
Fitzgerald
Tureaud

A Michigan victory would give
the Wolverines their first winning
season since 1957 when Bennie
Oosterbaan's squad finished with
a 5-3-1 mark. In 1958, Ooster-
baan's last year, Michigan was a
mediocre 2-6-1.
Last year, Elliott's inaugural
season, found the Wolverines fin-
ishing fast to compile a losing,
but creditable, 4-5 slate.
Seeking Revenge
Michigan will also be seeking
to avenge its losses of the last
two years. In 1958 Indiana edged
Michigan 8-6 in a muddy battle,
and last year capitalized on Wol-
verine errors to score a 26-7 vic-
tory at Bloomington.
This game will also mark the
last encounter between the two
schools for an indefinite period.
The Hoosiers do not play Michigan
through 1965, the final Big Ten
schedule thus far drawn up.

iso',
ore
pa
irtkiewicz
older

PAUL POULOS GARY McNITT
... line stalwart ... defensive specialist

BOB JOHNSON REID BUSHONG'
... ace receiver ,..No. 1 punter

KICKOFF: 1:30 P.M. I

L 1i

Whites Defeat Blues
[n Freshman Game

C OME

to

'Sl

r\ 3r r

By CLIFF MARKS
Bill Dodd's two touchdowns led
the White squad to a 14-6 victory
over a stubborn Blue team yester-
day in the annual fall intra-fresh-
man game at Ferry Field.
A good sized crowd watched the
proceedings in sunny, but chilly
weather, and had little to cheer
about until late in the second
quarter when Dodd gathered in a
screen pass from quarterback Ron
Tate and went 40 yards for a
touchdown. The slightly bigger
Whites had formed a 'wall' in front
of Dodd and he used his blockers
effectively in the game's longest
play.
Pritchard Scores
When Tom Pritchard 'rolled out'
for three yards and two extra
points, the Whites had registered
an 8-0 lead with 1:24 left in a
half which had seen them threaten
three times.
A good Pritchard punt had put
the Blues in an early hole on
the two yard line after halfback
Brue McLenna elected to run the
ball out from the end zone. The
Whites held and a Frosty Evashev-
ski punt against the wind carried
only to the Blue 27. The hard
gang tackling of the Blue team
led by center linebacker Don
Blanchard forced the Whites to
punt back, but Dodd came through
with the first of two passhinter-
ceptions and returned to the Blue
28.
Blues Tighten
Once again the Blues tightened
up and mounted their first of-
fensive of the afternoon, moving
to the White 37 where the drive
stalled, with a five yard offside
penalty nullifying a fine pass play

from Evashevski to halfback Har-
vey Chapman. However, the Blues
elected to punt and White half-
back Jim Locke tried to run out
of the end zone and failed, but the
controversial play was ruled a
touchback, since the Blue impetus
carried the ball over the goal line.
Whites Score
After these three frustrations,
the Whites scored on 'the long
gainer and then werencontent to
contain the Blues until late in the
third period when Pritchard en-
gineered a 12 play, 47 yard drive,
finally passing to Dodd for the
score from four yards out.,
Peter Geis and Don Kornowa
had- alternated in carrying the ball
to inside the five when the Blue
defense stiffened once again, giv-
ing rise to the successful pass play.
The Blues had another drive
stalled by a hard charging White
line, but then threatened to come
back when Chapman grabbed a
punt on the dead run at the 50
and went to the White 21. After
McLenna picked up eight, Chap-
man fumbled and White halfback
Mike Shirley recovered the first
of his two Chapman fumbles.
Blues Determined
The second occurred on the Blue
20 late in the contest, and this
'drive' penetrated to the one yard
line before the determined Blues
threw quarterback Denis Alix on
the five.
Then, a wild passing attack
carried the Blues 95 rapid yards,
culminating in Tom Watters' 14-
yard pass to Wayne Sparkman,
with 24 seconds left, following a
51 yard pass play involving the
same pair.

-Photo by Paul Krynicki
FITZGERALD BOWS OUT-Michigan halfback Dennis Fitz-
gerald, shown here running against Minnesota, will be one of
the 13 seniors playing their last home game today.
Minnesota Risks Top Spot
Iowa ChallengesOhio State!

ON

THrlE

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND f ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
WESLEY FOUNDATION William and Thompson Streets

By BOB ROMANOFF
Two highly important contests
highlight a full schedule of Big
Ten activity today.
At Minneapolis, the Golden
Gophers of Minnesota will attempt
to assure at least a share of the
Conference title as they take on
Purdue's Boilermakers. Some wits
have labled Purdue, on the basis
of past performances, as the
"Spoilermakers."
At Iowa City, the Ohio State
Buckeyes meet Iowa's Hawkeyes
in a game which matches the only
serious challengers to Minnesota's
title aspirations.
In other games Michigan State
is at Northwestern, Wisconsin is
at Illinois, and Michigan plays
host to Indiana.
Major Problem
One of the major problems
which Gopher coach Murray War-
math has had to face this week
is trying to keep his squad ranked
number one in the nation on the
basis of a 7-0 overall record, from
becoming overconfident.
Although Purdue has only a 1-4
record in Big Ten play, its one
victory was over third-ranked
Ohio State by a 24-21 margin.

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Three Teams Vie for Big Eight Title
I e um TKCK

By TOM WEBBER
Before this year the Big Eight
has been obscured by their most
prominent member, Oklahoma,
and often was referred to as Okla-
homa and the Little Seven.
Much to Coach Bud Wilkinson's
chagrin, however, the other teams
in the league have developed foot-
ball powerhouses of their own.
Before the season football seers
had predicted that Oklahoma
would still be the team to be
reckoned with, but since then the
Sooners have had considerable
trouble in eking out a 2-4-1 record.
Faces Missouri
This week Oklahoma will face
Missouri, one of the teams which
has helped turn the Big Eight into
a formidable conference. The
Tigers are undefeated this year
and are ranked second nationally
and seem assured of an Orange
Bowl bid.
Missouri, with Donnie Smith and
Mel West doing the ball carrying,
have displayed one of the nation's
most potent offenses while rolling
to eight straight victories. West
has rushed for 612 yards in 124
carries to rank sixth in the na-
tion among the individual leaders.
Along with a possible return to

the Orange Bowl, Missouri is also
hoping to succeed Oklahoma as
the Big Eight champion. Missouri,
however, has not defeated the
Sooners since 1945.
Right on the heels of Missouri
in the Big Eight race are the Kan-
sas Jayhawks. Kansas, after get-
ting off to a fast start, has suf-
fered a close loss to Syracuse, a
Gymnastic Meet
Gymnastics coach Newt Loken
invites all interested spectators
to an intra-squad gymnastics
meet Monday at 7 p.m.
This meet will match the
sophomores against the rest of
the squad and will be held in
the gymnastics room of the
sports building.
tie with Oklahoma, and a NCAA
probation. Kansas, however, can
still capture the Big Eight crown
by defeating Missouri in next
week's meetinz with the Tigers.
Must Beat Colorado
This week the Jayhawks must
get by another contender for the
crown, Colorado. Kansas uses a
flashy offense centered around

triple-threat quarterback John
Hadl. Kansas is expected to put
up quite a battle for the crown,
since the probation has curtailed
any Bowl hopes.
Colorado, meanwhile, has suf-
fered only losses to Baylor and
Missouri in its eight games. This
is a must game for the Buffaloes
if they hope to keep their title
hopes alive.
Title Battle
In the neighboring Southeastern
Conference another title battle will
take place between two highly
rated teams.
Mississippi, fourth ranked, suf-
fered a tie to LSU last week and
can not afford another loss if they
want to win the Southeastern
championship. Both Auburn and
Florida are right behind Ole Miss
with only one loss apiece.
This week Mississippi meets a
determined foe in the Tennessee
Volunteers. The Vols were upset
last week by Georgia Tech and
now own a 5-1-1 record. This
could determine who will go to
the Sugar Bowl.
Boasts Single Wing
Tennessee is one of the few
teams in the nation that still runs
from the single wing. Ole Miss,
however, centers its powerful of-
fense around Jake Gibbs, its
talented quarterback, from the
spread T'-formation.
This week's college action should
give a good indication as to who
will appear In the post season
games.
It is possible that the South-
eastern and Big Eight Conferences
could send as many as two teams
each to the bowl contests.
TitansF
To Patriots
i )r Yr M r . - dnh S oarin

Last week Michigan State had to
go all out to contain the Boiler-
makers. State finally won the
game on a disputed touchdown.
Led by Allen
Purdue is led by quarterback
Bernie Allen who is the Confer-
ence's second-ranked passer, while
being third in total offense. He
has completed 40 of 66 passes for
470 yards and one TD. He has
rushed for 94 more yards for a
total offense record of 564 yards.
He will be one of the best passers
to face the Gophers this year.
The Gophers have reversed the
old maxim that, "the best defense
is a good offense," with "the best
offense is a good defense." In last
week's 27-10 upset of Iowa, Min-
nesota's monstrous line, led by
All - American guard candidate
Tom Brown, caused five Hawkeye
miscues. The Gophers capitalized
on three of them.
Televised Game
In a nationally televised contest
(2:30 on ABC), Ohio State will
pit its "four yards and a cloud of
dust" formula for winning against
fifth-ranked Iowa's speed.
A sellout crowd of 59,000 is ex-
pected to watch the Hawkeyes
close out their Big Ten home
schedule for the year. This will be
the last chance for Iowa partisans
to see Forest Evashevski as a
coach. He will retire at the end
of the season to devote himself
full time as Iowa's Athletic Direc-
tor.
Buckeye Offense
The Buckeye offense is led by
fullback Bob Ferguson and quar-
terback Tom Matte, who are
ranked one-two in rushing in the
conference. Matte also has the
Big Ten's top passing percentage,
.610, and is number two in total
offense with 629 yards.
Iowa is led by quarterback Wil-
burn Hollis and halfback Larry
Ferguson.
Should Minnesota be upset by
either Purdue, or Wisconsin next
week, the winner of the Ohio
State-Iowa game could share the
title. If Minnesota loses one of
its two remaining games they
would finish with a 5-1 record.
Close Race
If Iowa wins today it would
finish the season with a 5-1 con-
ference record. An Ohio State
victory this week, and next week-
end over Michigan would give
them a 5-1 record. It is also quite
conceivable that the Buckeyes or
Hawkeyes could take the title out-
right with the proper combination
of breaks.
ROTC Units
Meet Today
It's Army vs. Navy!
Not only do these perennial
powers of collegiate football meet
in Philadelphia in two weeks, but
the Army ROTC squad faces the
Navy ROTC team this morning
at Wines Field at 9 a.m.
Though neither team boasts a
Joe Bellino or a Tom Blanda, the
cadets are expected to provide
some good football action.
Navy will be rated as the favor-
ite over Army at Philadelphia, but

State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship. Loy-
alty Sunday. "When Religion Costs Some-
thing." Dr. Rupert preaching.
10:15 Seminar: Discussion on major religions of
the world. Christianity-Roman Catholi-
cism, Professor James C. O'Neill leading the
discussion.
5:30 Fellowship supper.
7:00 Worship and Program. Mr. Lynn De-
Moss, returned missionary from the Congo,
speaking on: "The Church in the Congo."
WEDNESDAYS--
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over in
time for 8:00 classes).
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
9:45 Student Bible Class, The Old Testament,
taught by Prof. Edgar E. Willis.
11:00 Worship, "The Strangeness of Christian-
ity," Mr. Middleton preaching.
6:30 Discussion: "Ethics in Advertising."
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9890
10:00 and 11:30-Meetings for Worship.
10:00-Adult Forum.
7:00-Young Friends: A talk by Howard Har-
ris, a High School Counselor and former
Friends minister.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YMCA Building, 350 S. 5th
Rev. Miller, Guest Minister
Sunday guest speaker: Student from the West-
ern Theological Seminary in Holland, Mich.
Morning Service: Mr. Paul Bannenga and Mr.
Vernon Kortering.
Evening Service: Mr. Harold Gazen and Mr.
Wayne Millard.
Geneva Fellowship: Wednesday, Nov. 2-7:30
p.m. at church house.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 a.m. Sunday services
8:00 p.m. Wednesday services
9:30 a.m. Sunday school (adults up to 20
years old)
11:00 a.m. Sunday school (children 2 to 6
years old)
A reading room Is maintained . at 306 E.
Liberity, 10:00 to 5:00 daily except Sun-
days and holidays 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:30A.M. "Biblical Thought," Seminar; 524
Thompson Street; Rev. J. Edgar Edwards.
10:45 A.M. Worship, Rev. Russell Fuller.
7:30 P.M. Student Guild, "The Relevance of
Theology," Rev. Russell Fuller, Guild House,
524 Thompson Street.
MEMORIAL. BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
9:30 a.m. Seminar; Biblical Thought, Rev. .1.
Edgar Edwards, Guild House, coffee served.
Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.: Needed: a New
Reformation. Rev. Russell Fuller.
7:00 P.M. Evening Guild; Costume Halowe'en
Party, Memorial Christian Church, refresh-
ments.

Rev. JahnF. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John Fauser, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11 :00, 12
and 12:30.

noon

Holyday Masses: 6:30, 700, 800 9:00, 12 noon
and 5 p.m.
Daily Masses: 6:30, 8:00, 9:00.
Rosary and Litany daily at 5:10 in the after-
noon.
Novena Devotions in honor of Our Lady of Per-
petual Help: Wednesday evening at 7:30
p. m.
This week at the Gabriel Richard Center:
Sunday, November 13: Breakfast after the 9:30
Mass with Dr. Vincent Smith speaking on
Philosophy and Science -- Is Coexistence
Enough?"
Wednesday, November 15: After Novena De-
votions Dr. Stephen Tonsor will lecture on
"The Reformation and Counter-Reforma-
tion."
Friday, November 18: Thanksgiving send-off
with dancing from 8:30 until 11:30.
Anyone interested in learning to serve Mass
should contact Father Fauser immediately.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor.
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
10:45 a.m. "What a Christian Believes."
Lounge, Miss Nancy Prime.
7:30 p.m. Evening Guild, "The Relevance of
Theology," Rev. Russell Fuller.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
College Class 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Evening Discussion 7:00 P.M.
(E. Stanley Jones book, "Christian
Maturity")

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wm. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 11:50 a.m.
Dr. Henry Kuizengq preaching: "Let God
Worry!"
Presbyterian Campus Center for University Stu-
dents:
Sunday, Nov. 13
10:30 a.m. Adult Class-Students invited.
Prof. A. K. Stevens. Meets in the Cur-
tis Roam.
11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour in the French
Room. For students-following 10:30
a.m. service.
6:45 p.m. Presbyterian Student Fellowship
Forum. Topic of discussion: "Existen-
tialism." Lead by Pat Pickett in French
Room.
Tuesday, Nov. 15
9:00 p.m. "Coffee & Conversation" -
stimulating discussion for all stuents.
Held at Pat Pickett's Apt.-217 S. Ob-
servatory.
Friday, Nov. 18
6:15 p.m. Grad Group Dinner & Program.
All graduate students welcome. Group
will attend lecture by Mr. H. S. Com
Mager.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL.
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L. Dauer, Vicar
Elizabeth Lamb, Director of Music
Sunday Services at 9:45 and 11:15: Sermon by
the vicar, "The Whole Armor of Christ."
Sunday Bible Study at 9:45 and 11:15.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program. Taking of
Group Picture of Gamma Delta for the 1961
'Ensian at 6:45, followed by discussion of
"The Christian Student & Doubt."
Wednesday at 9:00: Special Vesper Service for
Married Students, with sermon by the pas-
tor,-"Helpmates Indeed!"
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services at 9:30, 10:20, and 11:00 a.m.
"Noblesse Oblige," Dr. Fred E. Luchs preaching.
Bible Lecture: Dr. Preston Slosson, "The Second
Isaiah."
Coffe Hour Between Services.
Church School: crib through 12th grade, 9:30 -
10:40; 10:55-12:00.
STUDENT GUILD: 524 Thompson, "The Rele-
vance of Religion," The Rev. Russell Fuller.
Dr. Luchs Radio Vespers, 5:00 each Sunday,
WOIA, 1290.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Sf. at S. Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622
Sunday-
9:00 & 11:00 a.m. Worship Services.
10:00 a.m. Bible Study.
6:00 p.m. Supper followed by social eve-
evening.
8:30p.m..Holy Communion.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 3-0589
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 Church School.
845 and 11:00 Morning Worship Services.
"Life Through the Word of God."
5:30 Student Guild.
5:45 Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups.
7:00 Evening Service. "The Christian and Au-
thority."
7:30 Wednesday Prayer Meeting.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister.

4

Warriors Remain. Unbeaten
With Victory Over Hawks

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible School
11 :00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDN ESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study

PHILADELPHIA (W)-The Phil-
relphia Warriors made it nine
ational Basketball Association
ins in a row last night, def eat-
g the St. Louis Hawks, West-
mn Division leaders, 117-112 be-
re a standing room crowd at g
onvention Hall.

New York 112, Syracuse 108
Boston 128, Cincinnati 110
NEW YORK (P)-The New York
Knickerbockers snapped a six-
ame losing streak last night with
a 112-108 victory over the Syra-
use Natio'nals in the second game
of a National Basketball Asso-
iation doubleheader.
Tn the nnener the Bostnn Ce1-

NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL,
2250 Fuller Road
(opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
William S. Baker, Minister
Morning Worship-10:45 a.m.
Church School and Child Care provided.
Sermon: "Making Life Count."

After a cold start the undefeat-
d Eastern Division leaders, paced
y Wilt Chamberlain, broke the
ame wide open midway in the

c
Ci
o
C3

this morning's game
called a tossup.

has beenI

U

Morning Services, 8:45 and 141:00 A.M.
University Bible Class, 10:00 A.M.

I

II -- I -I -

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