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November 09, 1960 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-09

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4.30 A.M. ELECTION
RETURNS

Yl r e

Seventy Years of Editorial Freedom

!!Iaitj

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1960 FIVE CENTS SIX PAO

fXXI, No. 44

Bemocrats

IKeep

Control

over

Michigan s
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4

T

Swainson

Carries State
WiMs Governorship
Over GOP's Bagwell
Democrats Leading Across State
As Final Vote Results Roll In
By MICHAEL BURNS
Special to The Daily
DETROIT-Lt. Gov. John B. Swainson was awaiting the in-
evitable concession statement from Republican Paul Bagwell at 4
a.m. today as the Democratic gubernatorial candidate was sweeping
to a smashing victory.
With 4,226 of 5,074 precincts reporting, Swainson had 1,454,541
votes in to Bagwell's 1,368,079.
The heavier than usual voting in out-state areas appeared to

be the reason for the incomplete

-Daily-David Giltrow
JOHN B. SWAINSON-AWAITS CONCESSION
TWICE IN 24 YEARS:
Democratic Nominee Wins
State Electoral Colle e
DETROIT (M)-Democratic candidates-from President through
top state offices-appeared today to have swept Michigan in an un-
precedented outpouring of votes.
John F. Kennedy led the entire ticket in his bid for the presi-
dency, with more than half of the state's 5,074 precincts reporting.
Victory for, the Massachusetts senator marks only the second
time in the past 24 years that Michigan has approved a Democratic
presidential candidate. With 3,-

Republican
Incumbents
Win County
By PETER STUART
Twenty - year veteran county
clerk Mrs. Luella M. Smith paced
her fellow Republicans in a com-
plete sweep of Washtenaw County
offices in yesterday's election.
Seven incumbent Republicans
were returned to office, all by more
than 5,000-vote margins, indicat-
ing that the Republican county
dominance stands virtually as
strong as in recent years.
As the top vote getter, Mrs.
Smith garnered 25,277 votes to
her Democratic challenger Mrs.
Adeline Drews' 14,436, with 43 of
73 precincts reported. Mrs. Smith
is also presently president of the
Michigan Association of County
Clerks.
In the sheriff's race, Republican
Gaorge A. Petersen defeated
Democrat Lawrence P. Oltersdorf,
23,210 votes to 16,834 votes. Peter-
sen is completing his first term
as sheriff, after serving 17 years
in the department in the ranks of
deputy, sergeant and captain.
His opponent, Oltersdorf, lost
his sixth try for the sheriff post.
His family has a long record of
police work in the Ann Arbor and
Detroit areas.
Republican treasurer William
F. Verner made his bid for a
seventh term successful by beating
See GOP, Page 6

tallies; both candidates were re-
luctant to give any official state-
ment on the outcome of the elec-
tion.
Swainson received a larger to-
tal vote plurality than the incum-
bent Governor G. Mennen Wil-
liams did in 1958 when he was
bowing out as Michigan's chief
executive.
The emphatic win for the 35-
year old Lieutenant Governor was
reminiscent of William's "boy
Governor" victory in 1948 over
Kim Sigler.
The Democratic nominee was
reluctant to issue a statement all
night despite the trend in his
favor. Hie did say, "I feel like
when I was in the infantry dur-
ing the war. I knew what was go-
ing on in my foxhole but I didn't
know if we were inning the war."
At 12:30 a.m. the youthful vic-
tor spoke to a large crowd of his
jubilant supporters and thanked
them for their help. He said he
was flattered by the apparent
lead he held.
The campaign had been mov-
ing "very well" and from early
indications he had "a certain
amount of confidence." In a news
statement later, the Lieutenant
Governor said that the trend in
his favor fit in with the Demo-
cratic victory achieved' national-
ly.
At 3:45 a.m. neither Gov. G.
Mennen Williams nor Bagwell was
willing to make any claims to
victory because of conflicts in
reported figures. Several discrep-
ancies showed up in figures re-
leased by the Associated Press,
and party leaders stated it may
take till late this morning to
straighten them out.

-Daily-David Giltrow
PRESIDENT-ELECT JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY
MEADER REELECTED:
Democrats Capture
Contro of House
By The Associated Press
The Democrats clinched control of the House of Representatives
early today as returns mounted.
Republicans captured 14 House seats held by Democrats but lost
4 to Democratic challengers for a net GOP gain of 10. In the last

Governorships
Lead Taken
By Democrats
The Democrats maintained a
majority of gubernatorial posts to-
day as voters named governors in
27 states.
Although seven seats were still
not settled early this morning, the
Democrats captured 13 states to
add to their 19 which were not up
for voting. Republicans, with a
carryover of four governors, won
seven more posts. This gives the
Democrats 32 governors, the Re-
publicans 11.
In unsettled races, Democrats
led in five and the Republicans in
two.
In nearly a third of the con-
tests, voters changed the partisan-
ship of the state administration.
Democrats replaced GOP leader-
ship in Rhode Island, West Vir-
ginia, Delaware, Illinois, and North
Dakota. Republicans retaliated by
taking the elections in formerly
Democratic Kansas, Massachusetts
and Iowa.
As of 4 a.m. results were not
known in Maine, Reed (R) vs.
Coffin (D); Montana, Nutter (R)
vs. Cannon (D); Nebraska, Morri-
son (D) vs. Cooper (R); New
Mexico, Burroughs (D) vs. Mc-
Chem (R); South Dakota, Her-1
seth (D) vs. Gubbard (1'); Wash-
ington, Rosellini (D) vs. Andrews

535 precincts tabulated, the unof-
ficial state count gave Kennedy
an edge of about 136,000 votes.,
Supreme Court1
Justice Theodore Souris led Cir-
cuit Judge James R. Breakey in
the race to fill the Supreme Court
post vacated by the resignation of
Justice John Voelker.
Election officials said a projec-
tion of the expected final vote to-
tal indicated the final count might
come up to pre-election predic-
tions of 3.5 million.
In any event, the record Mich-
igan turnout topped the all-time
mark of 3,080,460 set In the pres-
idential election year of 1956.
Toss-Up
In that year, Dwight D. Eisen-
hower carried the state by more
than 353,000 votes. In 1952, his
plurality was 321,000.
Michigan, regarded as a poli-
tically-doubtful "swing state" this
year, saw both presidential can-
didates waging heavy campaigns.
Kennedy made his first formal
speech on Labor Day in Detroit:
Nixon closed his major campaign
effort with a speech and a four-
hour national network telethon in
the Motor City. In between, both
nominees criss-crossed the state
by plane and auto and with an
old-fashioned "whistle-stop" train
tour.
Based on past performance and
present observation, Michigan was
regarded a tossupa this year.
Williams in Line
The state had not gone for a

session the Democratic margin "
was 283-154. In the races still
undecided, Democrats lead in 56
and Republicans in 67.
Rep. George Meader won over
his Democratic opponent, Tom
Payne, to return to his seat in
Congress from Michigan's second
congressional district which in-
cludes Ann Arbor.
Late returns showed the GOP
incumbent leading Payne by a
comfortable margin, 70,956 to 50,-
002, with 143 out of 238 precincts
reported. Meader, an Ann Arbor
lawyer, has held the Congression-
See DEMOCRATS, Page 6

Proposals.
Local voters approved both
the liquor by the glass propo-
sal and city hall bond issue,
with most of the returns in
early this morning.
State voters affirmed all
three constitutional amend-
ment proposals, though the
sales tax limit increase barely
squeezed through.
Details may be found on page
six.

I

ELECTION NIGHT VIGIL:
Foreign, U.S. Students See How It Goes

Emotions Range:
Sad to Sanguine
By. SUSAN FARRELL
and FAITH WEINSTEIN
Students dug in around tele-
vision sets and radios last night,
awaiting election results in an
atmosphere which ranged from
quiet tension to open lethargy.
How is it going?-some kept
asking, and the question hummed
through the air like the continual
buzz of commentators' voices
emanating from quadrangle win-
dows.
"Am far c Vr nn___v~ a a

Evaluations Vary:
Neutral, 'Kennedy
By IRIS BROWN
International students tend to
be either pro-Kennedy or neu-
tral, to disapprove of the empha-
sis on the religious issue, and to
commend the United States vot-
ing system, although they con-
sider it a uniquely American
phenomenon,
They, gave these opinions last
night while visiting the polls,
Democratic headquarters, City
Hall and the County Bldg. as part
of an International Center elec-

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