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November 06, 1960 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-06
Note:
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t...

and Latin America

Have We Forced Cuba
Into the Soviet Camp
Beause of Past Relations ?

Election Results
1952 and 1956

U.S. and Latin A

By JOHN ROBERTS

V

who opposed him, rallied the poor
urban workers and came to pow-
er with their backing. Subsequent
revolutions in Colombia, Vene-
zuela, and Bolivia have also been
popularly supported. And of course
the best and most recent exam-
ple is Cuba,
The Cuban revolution is at once
an indictment of past American
policy and a clue to the future.
Behind the intemperance of Cas-
tro's violent anti-Americanism
lies an essentially just complaint:
The United States had supported
Batista with arms, money and
moral backing, in exchange for
the right to exploit the people
and resources of the island. Our
recent condemnation of Trujillo
notwithstanding, this has been

standard American policy
throughout Latin America. It is
a policy that has generated a
groundswell of resentment and
hatred, of which Cuba-and fu-
ture Cubas-are the inevitable by-
products.
AT THE same time, the positive
aspect of the revolution pro-
vides its own best guide to fu-
ture American approaches. A so-
cial upheaval of major propor-
tions is being fashioned in Cuba.;
The old entente of aristocracy,
church and state has been over-
turned from beneath. Land re-
form, housing projects, expanded
health and educational facilities

and the new championing of
their welfare has- given the poor
masses a heady sense of power.
These are things that the masses
want. If they cannot get them-
and fast with existing institutions,
they will create new ones-all
through Latin America.
The United States, of course,
has always maintained that it
wants only the best for the people
-education, good health, a demo-
cratic government, freedom of ex-
pression, the right to a decent
standard of living. This is easy
to say, but our actions have belied
our words. The next president will
have the responsibility of seeing
that the hypocrisy of the past isk

replaced by a sincere and all-out
effort to bring the people of Lat-
in America into the twentieth
century.
THE EMPHASIS here is on the
"all-out." Since thi end of the
war, only four billion dollars In
aid has gone to Latin America
from the United States. And
President Eisenhower in his press
conference of July 11 said, "I do
want to say this: The only real
investment that is going to flow
into countries that will be useful
to them in the long run is private
investment, . . I would not think
of (this plan) as anything rN*
Continued on Page T

rtJ.
rj El
aEC TORAL *VO TE rl
G4 rnhl~Wrr 44'1
Steveneson 29 Ik E1 K

T7HE next president, be he John
Kennedy or Richard Nixon,
will be called upon soon after
taking office to make major de-
cisions regarding our Latin Amer-
ican policy. That policy, in real-
ity, is no more separable from
the general problem of handling
all emerging nations than the
Cuban question is separable from
Latin America. But Americans
have in the past considered this
hemisphere as entirely our busi-
ness.
We have sheltered the Latin
states with the Monroe Doctrine,
kept our Marines handy to quiet
disorders, and taken over whole
economies through foreign invest-
ment. So there is every likelihood
that the United States will persist
for some time in the myth that
Latin America is somehow differ-
ent from Africa and Asia.
S HIS,of course, is not true. The
so-called 'revolution of rising
expectations is as operative in
Latin America as it is in all un-
derdeveloped regions. This is dif-
ficult for Americans to under-
stand, accustomed as we are to
the romanticized picture of the
happy, simple peasant, digging
yams and taking siestas. Modern
technological strides have brought
to the submerged masses knowl-
edge of the better life, but not
the better life itself.
Ignorance, poverty and disease
are still the facts of daily exist-
ence for the masses in Latin
America, while the press and mo-
vies offer first hand testimony of
higher standards of living else-
where: The Latin peasant may
be illiterate, but it takes very little
education to understand an auto-
mobile advertisement. Things such
as this have caused Turbay Ayala
of Colombia to warn his fellow
government officials of the OAS
Continued on Page Eight

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JOHN ROBERTS is a jun.
ior in the literary college hon-
ors program and is majoring
in astronomy. He is a member
of The Daily staff.

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