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November 04, 1960 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

f

LION END:

Everywhere else
at J. Be TOWNE

1495
1175

Cogdill Becomes Rookie Star

Late rives Vewe-
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By FRED STEINARDT I
The latest in a long line of out-R
standing Detroit Lion ends is Gail
Cogdill.
The rookie from Washington,
State is the second leading re-
ceiver on the team behind Jim
Gibbons. As of the Baltimore gamea
two weeks ago he had caught 14'
passes for 236 yards.
Originally from Utah, Cogdill's7
family moved out to Spokane in
his childhood. While in college,
he was named to the UPI All-
America team.
NCAA Record
Against Northwestern in 1958 he
caught seven passes for 252 yards,
an average of 36 yards per catch.
This stands as an NCAA record.
A sixth round draft choice of
the Lions, Cogdill starred for the
West in the East-West Shrine
game and for the North in the
Senior Bowl.
His early performance has pushed
old hands Steve Junker and Dave

Middleton to the sidelines. Against
San Francisco he pulled in eight
passes, only to see the Lions lose
14-10 in the last second on a
John Brodie to R. C. Owens pass.
Longest Play
Against Baltimore he caught his
longest pass of the year, 55 yards.
The play moved the ball down to
the Colt's five yard line and set
up the Lion's first touchdown.
"The play didn't actually come
off the way it was supposed to,"
Cogdill said after the game. "I
was supposed to cut between the
long and short defender. But I cut
in front of both anc circled back
around to reach the sideline."
Cogdill's assets are great hands,
maneuverability and speed. (He
won a track letter in his sopho-
more year at Washington State.)
He has made several circus catches
this year to become a favorite of
Detroit fans. Against the 49ers
he made two diving catches on
crucial plays.,

Standing 6'2" and weighing 195,
Cogdill has the build to with-
stand the constant pounding of
pro ball. But he has trouble keep-
ing his weight up high enough.
"I lose at least five or six pounds
a game, maybe more," he said, as
he pulled in his belt another
notch. "I sure could use five or
ten extra pounds. It might slow
me down a half a step but it would
be better in the long run because
I would be stronger."
Rookie of the Year
If he continues to play as well
as he has, Cogdill could be a con-
tender for Rookie of the Year
hdnors. Other contenders come
from a list including Angelo Cola,
Chicago Bears, Tom Moore, Green
Bay Packers, and Lion teammates
Bob Scholtz and Roger Brown.
Cogdill moved to Detroit this
year with his wife Diane. He plans
.to play "at least a few more years"
arid then to go into business.

When Michigan's football war-
riors came charging down the4
field last Saturday at Wisconsin
in a last ditch effort to win the
game with two minutes to go,
Wolverine fans were undoubtedly
wondering, 'why didn't they drive
like, this earlier?'
As it happened, the drive end-
ed seven yards short of the goalj
when time ran out, with Michi-
gan still having two downs left
and only three points behind.
Not Easily Answered
The above question is not eas-
ily answered. As defensive coach
Bob Hollway put it, there are
about five parts to the answer,
1) fumbles, 2) pass interceptions,
3) penalties, 4) faulty execution,
and 5) inability to come upwith
the big play when peeded.
"If you have a penalty, or some-
one misses an assignment," said
Hollway, "you have to come up
with the long yardage. Wisconsin
did this better than us Saturday
and they won the game."
Such a 'big play' situation oc-
curred when Michigan had the
ball deep in Badger territory in
the first half, only to see an in-
terception halt the drive.
Every Drive Died
As Hollway pointed out ever,
more clearly, the Minnesota game
was an instance when every Mich-
igan drive was stalled by one of
three costly mistakes, fumbles, in-
terceptions, or penalties. "This
happens to every team," he said,
"and it's the one that jells with
11 men executing their job that
wins.",
The Wolverines have been able
to move the ball, and well, against
every team they have played. But

to
do
es
f al
W
eal

Tone Tnemse . T ney came
wn the final minutes with pass-
flying and risky runs, only to
11 short, in yards and time.
hy don't they open up like this
xlier?

i
-

Opponents Primed
"We are trying to set things
up the whole game," saidh oll-
way. "Our opponents are primed
to stop our halfbacks and Glinka
(Dave) on sweeps and roll outs.
We have to draw them inside so
that the wide runs and passes
can go."
He also mentioned that the rea-
son for Michigan's late success
against Wisconsin was that the
Badgers were playing a "preven-
tive' defense, guarding against the
'big play.' "The short ones went,
but we didn't come up with the
big scoring play," said Hollway,

"though we thowed how we can
moue, even with the pressure on,
when the errors are eliminated."
Hollway echoed Coach Bump
Elliott in saying, "We hope to
open them up earlier and not wait
'till the end, but we need every-
one clicking. When they do, it's
easy."
Practice Notes
It was disclosed in practice yes-
terday that Jim Ward, sophomore
right halfback from Imlay City,
injured his knee Wednesday _and
will be out for the season. Ward,
who will be operated on this morn-
ing, was very impressive earlier in
the season.
The team had'a fairly short
workout yesterday which ended
with a brief team meeting.

OhNo
It Can't Be o

--

3 lill

I11

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Brahms Symphony No. 1
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Peter and the Wolf (Prokofiev)
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Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6-Munch
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ORIGINAL STUDENT TOUR TO THE PACIFIC

I Sttkh&uaQ earc

H A~',~IUNIVERSITY
H WI SUMMER SESSION
6 UNIVERSITY CREDITS AVAILABLE
ls
63 D AY S $ Al ge
JUNE 7 - AUG.8 ONLY x
Earn vp to 6 credits at University of Hawaii
summer session while enjoying full summer of
fun and sun at Waikiki. Tour price Includes: Out-
bound by ship, return to West Coast by jet air-
plane, campus dormitory accommodations, and
most extensive itinerary of parties, dinners,
entertainment, sightseeing, sailing, beach activ-
ities, pius all'necessary tour services. Roundtrip
steamship and apartment residence at Waikiki
available at adjusted tour rate.
IANI(AuU STUDY
TOUR
9 UNIVERSITY CREDITS AVAILABLE
82 Days ... ONLY1892
H awail prog ram above combined with 21 days
on Japan field study course of 3 university
credits. Japan tour Includes roundtrip jet travel
from West Coast, and all first class and deiuxe
services ashore-very best hotels, all meals, tips
and sightseeing, plus extensive parties, special
dinners, entertainment, and social events as well
as all necessary tour services.

r.rl

ORIENT STUDY TOUR
OFFICIAL COLLEGE PROGRAM OFFERING
UNIVERSITY CREDIT
Classes Aboard Ship and Ashore
HAWAII 66 DAYS
JAPAN
FORMOSA $
PHILIPPINES ONLY
HONG KONG
Earn 6 university credits while enjoying the
Orient. All inclusive price covers five countries,
roundtrip steamship, and all first class services
ashore-very best hotels, all meals, sightseeing,
Inland sea cruise, tips and most extensive
schedule of parties, special dinners, entertain.
ment, social events, plus all necessary tour
services. Arranged by J. D. Howard who visits
the Orient as many as three times a year.
CHOICE Of COURSES - ALL FIELD STUDIES

-- I

Hired
As Yank GM
NEW YORI &-Roy Hamey,
58, succeeded George Weiss, 66,
as general manager of the New
York Yankees yesterday as the
latest step of a youth movement
that previously resulted in the fir-
ing of 70-year-old.Manager Casey
Stengel.
Dan Topping, Yankee co-own-
er, said Hamey would work on
a, year-to-year basis at his own
request. No terms were disclosed
but Hamey was believed to have
settled for somewhat less than
Weiss' reported $100,000 salary.
NHL SCORES
Detroit 8, Boston 5

r
r
t

After years of verbal sparring
and jousting the Union and The
Daily have agreed to pit their
legions in combat on the great
field of Ferry in the first annual
"Bier Bowl" at three and one
half hours after mid-day this
afternoon.
A gathering of over one hun-
dred strong-stomached souls 'are
expected to be on hand to cheer
for their favorites. The Union has
attempted to mobilize the League,
selective sororities, women's dor-
mitories and the Fiji Marching
Band to advance their cause.
Late last night The Daily was
vainly attempting to get AADAC,
Voice, the Ann Arbor NAACP, and
Martha Cook to join their backers.
However, the Daily's morale will
definitely be boosted by the first
women cheerleaders in Michigan
history. The cheer squad will be
led by Judy Nicholson, '61, Daily
Business Manager and Margie
Bluestein, '61, Associate Business
Manager.
Caught in the tremendous pre-
game excitement generated by this
unprecedented event Miss Blue-
stein said, "football, what's that?"
Local oddsmakgrs have estab-
lished The Daily slight favorites
because of its manpower advan-
tage. However, if the Union plays
President Perry Morton, '61, and
Administrative Vice - President
Michael Turoff, '61, The Daily will
be favored by 12 points. But if
The Daily elects to play Tom Ka-
baker, '61, Magazine Editor, the

contest will then be rated a toss-
up.
The leaders of the opposing
forces, T.S. "Dump" Applebaum,
'61, of The Daily, and "Bump"
Baron, '62, of the Union, both
predicted victory.
----The Union," Applebaum
said, "we're going to win?",
- "--The Daily," Baron said,
"we're going to win?"'
* The winner of the game, played
under I-M rules, will receive "The
Big Brown Wastebasket" symbolic
of victory in this classic.

,

Humanities . . . .
Social Sciences . . .
Oriental Art .
Oriental Art Appreciation

N
.0

6
.
.

S
.0
.0

3 units
3 units
3 units
3 units

APPLY:
MRS. EDNA STRACHAN
1415 Cambridge Rood
Tel: NO 5-7953

r'

WASTEBASKET
. . winner take aI

Montreal 3, Toronto 1

I

FRESH

E

I

Important Mass Meeting

Sunday, Nov. 6

i

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I

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_ E p o , 1 6 o u nc s 't h

I

I

*

~bOZog

Michigan Union

Room 3R-S

7:00 P.M.

A Discussion of Extra-Curricullar Activities
with comments by
Walter "Bud" Rea, Dean of Men,
Perry W. Morton, President of Michigan Union
And an opportunity to join the staff of the

I

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