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October 22, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-22

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THE MIICHIGA'N DAILY

nevara

gays Cuba
Soviet Aid

DEFY PROVINCIAL CURFEW:
Mobutu Troops Stand Ground in Cong

~

Counts on

I

Talk Refers
To Miltar ,
T rade Help
Notes Possible Use
Of Red Volunteers
HAVANA P) - Maj. Ernesto
Guevara, Cuba's economic czar,
told a nationwide television audi-
ence the Castro regime is count-
ing on Soviet aid to help defeat
any United States economic or
military intervention.
The leftist president of the
Cuban National Bank spoke of
Soviet bloc economic help, rockets
and volunteers in an address
Thursday on the eve of his de-
parture for Moscow as director of
a nine-man trade-building mis-
so.Mertiois Volunteers
Guevara mentioned the volun-
teers casually in connection with
a promise that new friends will
help tbo revolutionary government
survive whatever actions the
United States takes.
Reports have circulated abroad
that 3,000 Communist Czechoslo-
vak troops are training to serve
in Cuba. But Guevara's statement
was the first by any government
official that any such help is
promised if Cuba needs it,
"Volunteers" have been a prime
weapon ti Communist strategy
since Red China sent thousands
of its regulars across the Yalu
River 10 years ago under that
label to battle United Nations
forces in Korea.
Guevara Questioned
Questioned about the state of
Cuba's foreign exchange, Guevara
suggested that the time is com-
ing "when we should forget about
foreign exchange balances.
",By the year's end, Cuba's bal-
ance should be at the $100 million
level," he said, as compared with
'$46 million at the end of 1959.
Guevara discounted the effec-
tiveness of the United States' eco-
nomic embargo of any shipments
to Cuba except food and medical
Supplies.
He predicted that American
black marketeers will help to break
Bishops Cause
Political Issue
In Puerto RCo
SAN JUAN (P)- Three Roman
Catholic bishops of Puerto Rico
kicked up a political storm yes-
terday with a pastoral letter for-
bidding Catholics to vote for Gov.
Luis Munoz Marin's Popular
Democratic Party.
Munoz Marin, seeking re-elec-
tion as governor of this United
States island commonwealth Nov.
8, issued a statement declaring
the bishops' letter "Is an incredi-
ble and unjust intervention in
political liberties of Puerto Rican
citizens." Puerto Ricans, lacking
statehood, do not vote for Presi-
dent of the United States.
As published in the independent
newspaper El Mund6, the pastoral
letter took issue with Munoz Mar-
in's administration on three is-
sues - religious instruction in
schools, a law permitting teach-
ing of birth control and allowing
sterilization, and public tolerance
of common law marriages.
"It is our obligation to prohibit
Catholics from giving their votes
to a party that accepts as its
own the morality of 'the regime
of liberty' negating Christian mor-
als," it said.
If the letter has any influence

on the election, the beneficiary
would be the newly formed Cath-
olic Action Party, whose forma-
tion was criticized by the Popular
Democrats as an attempt to mix
religion and politics. The letter
does not mention the Catholic Ac-
tion Party.

COMMERCE SECRETARY:
Official Sees Business Improving

LEOPOLDVILLE (P)--Col. Jo-
seph Mobutu's troops firmly stood
their ground yesterday as the
young military man fought to
save his tottering military re-
gime from collapse.
Mobutu's commando units suc-
cessfully defied a curfew imposed
by the Leopoldville provincial
government, which remains loyal
to deposed premier Patrice Lum-
umba.
Cordon Reinforced
The Army also reinforced its
protective cordon around the Leo-
poldville radio station and the
editorial offices of the capital's
only daily, the Courrier d'Afrique.
Provincial President Cleophas
Kamitatu Thursday ordered all
newspapers to cease publication
for a month for having "incited
racial strife." He sent his gray-
uniformed provincial police to oc-
supy the Courrier offices and came

personally to see that the order
was carried out.,
" For a few moments the police-
men argued with the soldiers, but
then moved off. There was no vio-
lence and not a shot was fired.
The Courrier appeared as usual
yesterday afternoon and the po-
lice failed to carry out a threat
to arrest the boys selling the pa-
pers in the streets. But a police
squad occupied the unprotected
offices of the weekly Actualities
Africaine4 and prevented its ap-
pearance.
There was a tense moment at
the radio station during the night
when a platoon of Ghanian troops
appeared to reinforce the Unit-
ed Nations guard there.
The Congo soldiers thought the
Ghanaians bad come to take over.
the radio on behalf of Kamitatu
and called for reinforcements of

their own. Mobutu brought up a'
detachment of Congolese com-
mandos at 3 a.m. At daybreak
both sides agreed to withdraw the
reinforcements.
A ustralian, .Brton
SWinNobel Prize
STOCKHOLM (AP) - The 1960
Nobel Prize for medicine has been
awarded to an Australian and a
Briton for the discovery of acquir-
ed immunological tolerance
The award winners are Sir'
Frank MacFarlane Burnet, di-
rector of the Walter and Eliza
Hall Institute for Medical Re-
search in Melbourne, and Dr. Pe-
ter Brian Medawar, professor of
zoology ahd comparative anato-
my, (University College, London.

The move in the middle oJ
night was a flagrant violatic
Kainitatu's curfew, meant to
ply particularly to soldiers. K
tatu's police force clearly wa
no mood for a showdown.
Mobutu Is reported to
warned Rajeshwar Dayal,
UN chief, that Kamitatu is
paring a coup to bring Lumu
back to power. He also prote
a UN decision ,. to place,
Ghanaian policemen under K
tatu's indirect control for n
taining order in the city.
A UN spokesman said "1
can be no question of any
unit being placed under Cc
lese national authority-and
less under provincial authori
He conceded, however, that pa
would obey orders issued from
office of Mayor Daniel Kan:
Kamitatu appointee.

HOT SPRINGS (AP)-Secretary
of Commerce Frederick H. Muel-
ler, after consulting 100 of the
country's top industrialists, told
newsmen yesterday he sees bet-
ter business ahead.
"We are not in a recession, and
we are not going to be in a re-
cession," Mueller said following a
session with the Commerce De-
partment's Business Advisory
Council.
Mueller said he was "not as
pessimistic" as the Council's pan-
el of technical economic consult-
ants, made up of professional
economists from industry. These
forecast a further decline in in-
dustrial production before a re-
covery is expected in 1961.
Estimate Jibes
This estimate jibed with that
expressed by 13 business econo-
mists at a meeting of the Na-
tional Association of Business
Economists in New York Thurs-
day. Their consensus: The coun-
try is in a recession which will
get worse for a time, with a like-
ly upturn by mid-1961.
A TT Issues
Space Plans
WASHINGTON (JP-American
Telephone & Telegraph Co. said
yesterday it hopes to put up with-
in a year the first commercial
space satellite as the forerunner
of a communications relay net-
work in the sky.
The orbiting sphere would be
used to transmit telephone calls,
television and other types of com-
munications between the United'
States, the United Kingdom and
continental Europe.
The initial transmissions would
be experimental. Following satis-
factory tests, the company said,
commercial service would be of-
fered to the public.
AT&T applied to the Federal
Communications Commission for
authority to go ahead with the
project. It said it is ready to con-
tract for launching of the satellite
and to begin construction of
ground transmission and receiv-
ing stations.
Administrator T. Keith Glennan
of the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration has said
NASA will make available to pri-,
vate companies at cost rockets,j
launching and tracking facilities
and technical services. AT&T said
it would work closely with NASA.
The only artificial earth satel-
lites launched thus far have been
under government control, by this
country and the Soviet Union.
AT&T made no estimate of the
total costs of the project, which
it said it will finance and operate
in coordination with telephone ad-
ministrations abroad.

Mueller told reporters the "me-
oian" estimate of the Council's
professional economists was for a
$5 billion rise in total national
Asks Recall
OfOfficial,
ELISABETHVILLE (AP) - Presi-
dent Moise Tshombe of secession-
ist Katanga province last night de-
manded immediate removal of the
senior United Nations representa-
tive here and part of his military

staff.
Tshombe
Berendsen,

called the official
"totally inefficient."

Reading a hurriedly prepared
statement at a surprise news con-'
ference at his home, Tshombe de-
clared:
"The representative has been
working with such bad faith that
I consider myself obliged to de-
mandtas from Saturday his im-
mediate recall along with part of
the military staff at the UN head-'
quarters in Elisabethville. I am
deeply convinced it is impossible
to work honestly with them."
The dispute boiled up over what
Tshombe charged was scandalous
behavior of UN Ethiopian troops
in the northern town of Kabalo.
The news conference was call-
ed by Tshombe after a two-hour
meeting with Katanga delegates
who traveled Thursday to the
town of Kabalo in northern Ka-
tanga to investigate reports of
looting by Ethiopian troops.

output this quarter from the cur-
rent $503 billion dollar rate.
The production rate dropped in
the July-September quarter to
$503 billion a year, a decline of
$2 billion from the record pro-
duction rate of last spring. This,
and the September drop in wage
and salary income, retail sales,
housing activity and industrial
output, has given rise to increas-
ed recession talk.
Meets Newsmen
Mueller, meeting newsmen with
Ralph C. Cordiner, chairman of
the Advisory Council, issued a
statement evidently designed to
offset the pessimism. He said:
"Income is allove consumption,
and consumption is above produc-
tion in important lines, and to e
this adds up to better business
ahead."
Acknowledges Opinion
He acknowledged that some of
the industry economists were more
pessimistic but said others were
considerably more optimistic than
the median of their group opinion.
They anticipate a production rate
-in terms of gross national prod-
uct, or dollar value of all goods
and services produced-of $508 bil-
lion a year this quarter and next,
with a possible rise to $509 billion
in the spring quarter of 1961.
Industrial production, represent-
ing the physical output of mines,
factories and utilities-may drop
below the current level of 107
per cent of the 1957 average, the
industry economists said. It has
dropped from a record 111 per cent
in January to 107 per cent last
month. The economists said they
expected the 1961 recovery might
carry this index to a record high.

r A)E

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1

ON

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A ct tAr7tf

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. Morning Worship.
Layman's Sunday. "Youm ust Translate
it!" Dr, Rupert preaching.
10:15 Seminar: Discussion on major religions
of the world. Hinduism, Miss Maithili
Raghovan' leading the discussion. Pine
Room.
5:30 Fellowship Supper. Pine Room.
7:00 Worship and Program. "John Wesley
and his Implications for Today." Dr. Vau-
ghan Whited, minister of West Side Metho-
dist Church, speaking.
Wednesdays
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
(over in time for 8:00 classes).
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
9:45 Student Bible Class, The Old Testa-
ment, taught by Prof. Edgar E. Willis.
11:00 Worship, "The People's Choice," Mr.
Middleton preaching.
6:45 Student Fellowship Program. Christian
Ethic, Part Ill: "Ethics of Direct Action.".
Speaker, Miss Anna Holden, Social Re-
search Center, National Secretary of C.O.
R.E.

F

HEADQUAR TERS
FOR
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
SOUVENIRS
BANNERS
PENNANTS
BLANKETS
T-SHIRTS
BEER MUGS
BOOK ENDS
ASH TRAYS
SCRAP BOOKS
SWEA T SHIRTS
FELT ANIMALS
SLATE RS
YOUR COLLEGE BOOKSTORE

11

I

ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1416 Hill Street
NO 2-9 890
10:00 and 11:30-Meetings for Worship
10:00-Adult Forum
6:00 p.m Young Friends-supper at Bla-
loch's home, group discussion "Implica-
tion of the Friends Peace Testimony for
International Relations"
GUILD HOUSE
524 Thompson
Associated with the First Congregational
Church, Memorial Christian Church and
Bethlehem Evangelical Reformed Church.
Sunday 9:30 a.m. seminar beginning Sept. 25
at Guild House
Tuesdays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion at
Guild House
Tuesdays 4:30 coffee break
Fridays 12:00 cost lunch and discussion
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11 :00 a.m. Sunday services
8:00 p.m. Wednesday services
9:30 a.m. Sunday school (adults .up to 20
years old)
I1:00 a.m, Sunday school (children 2 to 6
years old)
A reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberity, 10:00 to 5:00 daily except Sun-
days and holidays 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:30 A.M. Seminar, Biblical Thought, Rev. J.
E. Edwards.dGuild House, 524 Thompson,
coffee served.
Morning Worship: 11:00 A.M. Rev. Russell
Fuller.
7:30 P.M. International Night, Guild House.
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John Fauser, Assistant
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12 noon,
12:30.
Holyday Masses at 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00, 12
noon, 5:00 p.m.
Doily Masses at 6:30, 8:00, 9:00.
Rosary and Litany: dily at 5:00 p.m.
Novena Devotions in honor of Our Mther of
Perpetual Help each Wednesday evening
at 7:30 p.m.
Classes at the Gabriel Richard Center each
week:
Monday: ' Fundamentals of the Catholic
Faith at 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday: Philosophy of Man at 6:45 p.m.
Nursing Ethics at 7:00 p.m.
Foundations of Christianity at 8:00
p.m.
Thursday: Sacred Scripture at 4:00 p.m.
Medical Ethics at 8:00 p.m.
This week at the Newman Club: -
Wednesday, October 26: Professor Harrison
lectures on "The Bible."
Friday, October 28: Holoween Party.
Sunday, October 30: European Breakfast
after the 9:30 Mass.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)
TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
FRIDAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor.
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 A.M. Seminar Biblical Thought, Rev.
J. E. Edwards. Guild House, 524 Thomps-
son, coffee served.
10:45 A.M. Seminar, What a Christian Be-
lieves, Miss Nancy Prime, Bethlehem
Church Lounge, coffee served.
Morning worship: 9:30 & 10:45 A.M. Rev.
Ernest Klaudt.
7:30 P.M. International Night, Guild House.
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH,
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
College Class 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
Wednesday Evening Discussion 7:00 P.M.
(E. Stanley Jones book, "Christian
Maturity")
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Church School, 10:00.
Church Service: 11:00, Sermon: "The Prophet-
ic Ministry of the Church"--Rev. J. Edgar
Edwards.
Adult Discussion: 10:00, Professor E. Lowell
Kelly, "Unitarians and Social Action,"
Student Group: 7:00 Transportation available
at 6:45 from quads, Alice Lloyd, Vaughn,
and Stockwell. Professor Robert Haugh,
"South Africa Today"

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
NO 2-3580
Jack Borckart, Campus Pastor
Wm. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 11:50 a.m.
9:00 a.m. Rev. David Van Winkle preaching:
"The Great Shepherd."
10:30 & 11:50 a.m.: Rev. Jack Borckardt
preaching: "A Crucial Question.
CAMPUS CENTER SCHEDULE:
Sunday,3Oct. 23-
10:30 a.m Adult Class. Prof. A. K. Ste-
vens. Curtis Room.
11:30 a:m. Coffee Hour in French Room.
6:45 p.m. P.S.F. Forum. "Religious Per-
secution Today."
Tuesday, Oct. 25-
9:00 p.m. "Coffee & Conversation." Pat
Pickett's Apt. 217 S. Observatory.
Thursday, Oct. 27-
7:00 p.m. Seminar in Chaffee Room. Ba-
sic Christian Beliefs.
Friday, Oct.. 28-
6:15 p.m. Grad Group Dinner. Speaker:
Ken Boulding. "A Friend Looks at
Pacifism."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL .
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur L. Dauer, Vicar
Elizabeth Lamb, Director of Music
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services,
with sermondby the pastor, "The Working
of the Kingdom."
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study
Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program. Talk
about her work by Deaconess Sylvia Mil-
ler of St. James Lutheran Church in Grosse
Pointe.
Tuesday at 8:30: Mepgg of Wives.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister.
Guild House at 524 Thompson.
Services 9:30, 10:20, and 11:00 a.m. "Why
I Don't Go to Church," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture: "Jeremiah," Dr, Preston
Slosson.
Coffee Fellowship Hour Between Services.
Church School: Crib-12th grade; 9:30-10:40
& 10:55-12:00.
Student Guild: 524 Thompson. "International
Night," 7:30.
Radio Vespers by Dr. Luchs, WOIA, 1290, at
5:45.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S.Forest Ave.
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Phone: NO 8-7622

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11

11

!n!!!n

Sunday-
9:00 A.M. Worship Service.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
11:00 A.M. Worship Service and
mwnion.
7:00 P.M .Speaker: Prof. Preston
son, History Dept. "The Christie
Citizen."

Com-
n Slos-
on as a

GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
Rene Clair#$
The ITALIAN
STRAW HAT
(France, 1927)

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
State and Huron Streets, NO 3-0589
Rev. William C. Bennett, Th.M., Pastor
10:00 Church School
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship Servici
5:45 Jr. and Sr. High Youth Groups
7:00 Evening Service
Missionary Christmas Program
7:30 Wednesday Prayer Meeting
SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH
216 Beakes St.
Welcomes Students
Rev. C. W. Carpenter, Minister.

Sunday School 9:45a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wed. 7:30 p.m.
Vespeers, Lane Hall, Tues., Fri.
p.m.

5:15-5:45

CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister.

Do You Think He'll Call?

Cooperating with the Southern Baptist Con-
vention.

9:30
11:00
3:00
7:30
5:30

A.M. Sunday School
A.M. Morning Service
P.M. Afternoon service
P.M. Evening Service
P.M. BYPU

Morning Services, 8:45 and 11:00 A.M.
University Bible Class. 10:00 A.M.

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