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October 21, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1Analyzes 'Crime and Punishment'

-Daily-Mike Krabach
DOSTOEVSKY SEMINAR - The epilogue of "Crime and
Punishment" was discussed yesterday in the Honors Lounge
of the UGLY. Participating were, left to right, Professers James
Gindin, Paul Henle, moderator, John Mersereau, Joseph Ableson
and James Meisel.

Facilities
Forbidden
To Groups
By RUTH EVENHUIS 1
The Student Government Coun-
cil has passed a motion request-
ing that the illegal use of Univer-
sity facilities by the Ann Arbor1
Direct Action Committee, the
Voice political party, and the stu-
dent note-taking service be dis-
continued.
Under Regents By-law 8.11b,'
University facilities are restrict-
ed tonrecognized student organi-
zations. None of the groups in-
volved has applied for Council rec-
ognition, although they have used{
facilities in the Student Activities
Bldg. which are assigned to rec-
ognized organizations.
The motion requested that these
recognized groups precent AADAC,
Vovie and the note-taking serv-
ice from using their facilities, and
that they be reprimanded by the
Council if they do not comply.
The motion also provided that
the groups in violation be informed
that they must be recognized in
order to use University facilities.
The Council has also passed
motions to delete two sections
from the original motion calling
for the referral of those persons
violating the by-law to the Joint.
Judiciary Council, and requested
the SAB Administrative Board to
insure that the illegal use be dis-
continued.
The Council in addition set the
terms for the newly-appointed
members on the Committee on
Membership Selection in Student
Organizations, one-year terms
ending June, 1961, for James Sed-
er, '61, and Wallace Sagendorph,
'61, and terms ending in Febru-
ary, 1962, under a staggered ar-
rangement for Robert Ross, '63,
and Jesse McCorry, '62.

BY LINDA REISTMAN
The University provided the
first parking lot exclusively for
the use of students with "C" and
"E~ permits this semester.
With more than 6,000 driving
permits issued last year through
the Office of Student Affairs, this
lone parking facility-built to ac-
commodate about 175 cars-has
hardly scraped the surface, Ron
Bassey, '61, member of the SGC
driving code revision committee,
said.
Allows Permits
Provisions of the Regents By-
Laws permit students of 21 years
old, or over,/commuters and those
who need transportation for work,
to have cars on campus.
Widespread misunderstanding of
the automobile's place on the col-
lege campus and the unwillingness
to face the situation can both
mark the history of driving reg-
ulations at the University.
Driving regulations trace their
origin to 1927; when there were
several automobile deaths among
students. The desire for regulation
included an attempt to keep the
University a "campus" school.
Other pressure which came from
having restrained driving regula-
tions since then came from the
municipal government of Ann Ar-
bor, which wanted to keep the city
streets clear and prevent any un-
necessary parking problems.
At first all student cars were
banned. Then the age limit was
set at435, thenhdown to 26 and
in 1954 when the present by-laws
were enacted, to 21.
Parking Becomes Problem
Parking became a- recognized
problem in the early 1950's be-
fore the present driving regula-
tions were effected. Parking places
became scarce on Ann Arbor,
streets around campus where

parking time was unlimited. The
problem was checked by increas-
ing the police patrol and impos-
ing assorted parking time limita-
tions.
The $7 which are paid for "E".
permits are used to pay for this
police enforcement, which includes
officers' salaries and patrol cars,
and( to collect funds for park-
ing facilities.
At the end of 1959, there was

approximately $70,000 in the fi
but the cost of erecting a 250-
car structure is about $1,300
car or a total of $250,090.
Any University parking struc
must desirably be self-liquidat
Bassey said. There now is eno
money in the building res
fund to float bonds for sue
parking structure. The m
problem is to find a suitable lc
I tion for such a parking facilit

OPENS THURSDAY EVENING,
NOV 3rd. MADISON THEATRE

I

NEW PARKING LOT:
'U' Considers Driving Codes

Procedures Changed
For Panhel Elections

XIRK DOUGLAS,
LAURENCE OLIMIER JEAN SIMMONS
CHARLES LAUGHTON PETER USTINOY
JOHN GAVIN TONYCURTIS NTUNNM
TECHNICOLRSUPER TECHNIRAMA*70

council members and to allow as-
sociate members of Panhel the
same number of votes in these
elections.
Formerly, house delegates heard
speeches at a regular meeting by
two candidates for each executive
position (previously selected from
petitions and interviews by the
executive council), then discussed
the candidates with their respec-
tive houses and voted the follow-
ing week on the basis of their
houses' recommendations.
New System
Under the new system each
house may decide how many dele-
gates to send to the meeting at
which candidates speak, and at the
same meeting each house will cast
three votes. The step of referring
all information to the individual
houses for discussion has been
eliminated, but the houses will
have all candidates' platforms a
week in advance.
The selection method for dele-
* gates and the way in which the
delegation will apportion its three
votes remain at the discretion of
the individual houses.
The nine members of Panhel
executive council have one vote
each, as they did previously.

ALL SEATS RESERVED!

EVENING AT Ii
(Sun. Eves, at 80)
MATINEE : Wednesday at 20
(Set."Stun., & Hole, at 2;30)
EVES: Sun. thrq Thurs.
EVES: Fri., Sat., & Hols.
MATS: Wednesday
MATS:Sat..Sun., & Holt,.

SCHEDULE Of
Orch. and
Lowersalt. Men.
$2.65 $2.00.
$3.00 $2.50
$2.00 $1.75
$2.50 $2.00

1a1ei
31.50
$1.80
$1.50
$1.50

II

On i. 4...U UO.
Acacia fraternity will hold an alumni homecoming open house
and dinner after the football game tomorrow. The Bill Curtin Trio
will furnish music for dancing from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Zeta Tau Alpha sorority has slated an open-open house after
the football game tomorrow, with refreshments to be served from
4 to 6 p.m. The M. Lumbro Trio will entertain with listening and
dancing music.

For Theatre Party Information Telephone Group Sales, WO. 34000
MADISON THEATRE, Grand Circus Park, Detroit. WO 34000
Plass ad a -- --ma $.....-each athe ta 0men) rh-lae
Me.,$ar
. "".Eat*s* mrs"o f .... s
as--,u-i -
monene..
(Make check o moaey order payable to Madison Theatre..
PF ase enclose a stamped, self-addressed return enlope.)-

CAFE.
PROM ETH EAN
508 E. William
Espresso Coffee House
Fri. andSat.
entertainment
begins 9 P.M.
- this week featuring
AL YOUNG

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at
ANN ARBOR RECREATION,
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THEDISHOP

Oct. 24: THE ITALIAN STRAW HAT (dir.
by Rene Clair, France, 1927)
Nov. 21: STRIKE (dir. by Eisenstein, Rus-
sia, 1925); and KINPRAVDA (Soviet
propaganda newsreel, 1 922)
Dec. 12: LAST TEN DAYS OF HITLER (dir.
by G. W. Pabst, Austria, 1955) ; INVA-
SION (Nazi propaganda newsreel, 1944)
and BRIEF EXCERPTS from evidence at
Nuremberg War Crimes Trial, 1946 (films
of Auschwitz extermination camp).
Jan. 16: MAEDCHEN IN NUIFORM (dir.
by Leontine Sagan, Germany, 1931);
andNICE TIME (British documentary,
1958)
Feb. 27: *LE MILLION (dir. by Rene Clair,
France, 1931); and ENTR' ACTE (Rene
Clair, 1924)

Mar. 20: THE TOLL GATE (William S. Hart,
U.S., 1920); and HIS BITTER PILL (prod.
by Mack Sennett, U.S., 191 6-with Mack
Swain)
April 17: I VITELLONI (dir. by Frederico
Fellini, Italy ,1954); and BAMBINI IN
CITTA (Italian documentary, 1946)
May 8: EARTH (dir. by Dovzhenko, Russia-
Ukrania, 1928); and THE ROUNDERS
(Keystone comedy, U.S., 1914, with Char-
lie Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle)
May 29: THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE
(dir. by John Huston, U.S., 1951); and
THE FIRST FILM PROGRAMS (Paris-Lon-
don-New York, 1895-6)
*"The only truly international sound film, LE
MILLION dispenses with English subtitles
because none are needed to clarify its story.
..." Museum of Modern Art Film Library.

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ALL SHOWINGS are on Monday evenings at 8 p.m. in Rackham Amphi-
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programs costs $4.50; the cost is pro-rated for late joiners at the rate
of 50c per program. For farther information call NO 2-6685 or NO 2-9359.

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