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October 16, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'y College Urges
u-Study Program

from Page 1)

er thtn freshmen) at-j
ny American college, but
will go to University
Robertson commented
ugh some foreign study
such as Stanford Uni-
have made basic errors,
,ns such as those estab-
Smith, Sweetbrier and
have set examples well-

a junior year abroad program"
and would "lean over backwards
to accommodate a student who
wishes to study abroad."
However, the report indicates
that three departments-miner-
alogy, speech, and botany-are not
interested in the program. They
felt that undergraduate study
abroad was a "luxury" or had no
relevance to their student's educa-
tion.
If the program is approved, the
University will be the thirteenth
American educational institution
to establish a program of study
abroad.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
'U' SCIENTIST:
Studies Solid State Physics 'LU
By THOMAS KASER BUSINESS SERVICES
To the new student wanderi ni wq
through the halls of Randall ON PACKARD AROUND THE CORNER CLASS
S,,FROM STATE ST Is THE PLACE FOR L S
Laboratory, physics on the re- THE VERY BEST FOODS IN TOWN
search level is a maze of elec- RALPH'S MARKET
tronic and scientific spaghetti, 709 Packard NO -7131
hopelessly technical and inappli- Open every night 'til midnight LINES
cable to practical living. 4 J20
Behind the jungle of oscillo-
scopes, vacuum systems and elec- °xRITZ BEAUTY SALON
tronic relay racks a busy scien- complete line of Beauty work
tist can be found gathering, or- __ey
ganizing and translating incip-6 E
ient-stage research data. His
name: Prof. Ernst Katz, of the Phone NO 8-7066
physics solid state research pro- AE
tgram. DANCE & LISTENING MUSICFigur4
Prof. Katz, who came to the So you can's afford a live band. Let
University in 947 from the Uni- ring you all the well known. Cal' Classified
Univrsit in 947fromthe ni-dance bands in Stereophonic Tape
versity of Utrecht, Netherlands. Recorders, amplifires an speaker and 9:00 and
was the first University scientist Donation only.
to teach in the relatively new .. .. A. Goresbeek & son
field of solid state physics. StereophonicDance Music
> fs660, Gill St., Ypsilanti HU 3-1977
Studies solids JAO O tL

sity

rtmental com-
in favor of the
osophy depart-
ely in favor of

FREE

THE MICHIGAN UNION

I

presents;

FOLK SINGING

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CONCERT

7:30 P.M.

Union Ballroom

Generally, Prof. Katz's research
involves the study of solid mat-
ter properties. Transistors, fluores-
cent lamps, photographic plates
and solar batteries are all exam-
ples of products yielded by solid
state physics research.
Recently, the Russians contri-
buted immensely to the field by
making a thermo-electric refrig-
erator, a device without any mov-
ing parts.
Though Prof. Katz's work in ildi-
rectly related to these outgrowths,
it is like most of physics in that
it is not so applicable to any one
end product. It deals instead pri-
marily with what is called by
scientists an increase in the fund of
basic scientific information. The
effects of magnetic fields on elec-
trical conduction and problems
connected with the formation of
ionic and photographic plate
crystals are being studied in par-
ticular.
Ions Not Fixed
Much of Prof. Katz's work is
connected with the study of ionic
crystals such as sodium chloride,
or common table salt. The ions
in all ionic crystals are not fixed,
but have a certain amount of mo-
bility, especially at high tempera-
tures.
By studying both the measure-
ments of electrical conductivity
and the diffusion rate of radio-
active tracers in the salt, Prof.
Katz has learned more about this
internal mobility. In addition,
Prof. Katz's lab was the first to
detect the effects of magnetic
fields on the electrical conductivi-
ty of sodium chloride,
In other areas, Prof. Katz has
a particular interest in the study;
of crystals as they grow from
solution under the influence of
impurities. In a closet-like evap-
oration cabinet, he can produce a
variety of snowflake-patterned
crystals, each distinct in design
and formation,

VIEWING BOX-A crystal slide is inserted into the box against
a background of black velvet. A round fluorescent lamp brings
out the minute pattern of crystals.

Featuring,

AL

YOUNG

I.

Anyone interested in participating
is asked to come to the Ballroom
at 7:00 P.M. on Wednesdaya

CRYSTAL PATTERN-Apparatus shows view of copper chloride
with ammonia added, to make ammonium chloride. Prof. Ernest
Katz studies curved, sinewy.crystals which are rare since most
crystals are straight.

LOOK TO KESSEL'S FOR FASHION

j

Test Light Effects
Also, with the cooperation of
the Eastman Kodak Co. of Roch-
ester, N.Y., the solid state labora-'
I I A 1M

tory has been studying the effects
of light on photographic plate
crystals. This, says Prof. Katz, is
not aimed at studying how to de-
velop finer-grained and clearer
photographs, but rather at under-
standing various light-sensitive
crystal reactions when exposed to
light.
Although graduate work in sol-
id state physics here is pursued
by a comparatively small number
of graduate students, career op-
portunities are very attractive. In-
dustry is cursently making "fan-
tastic" offers to new men in the
field. Each of his graduates dur-
ing the past several years had
at least a dozen offers from which
to choose, he asserted.
In addition, solid state physics
is blossoming throghout the coun-

try because of the relatively small
expense involved in setting up a
laboratory for such work. And
this small expense, Prof. Katz says,
is what permits foreign countries
to continue to contribute success-
fully to solid state physics re-
search.
Seminar on Africa
To Meet Tuesday
The first meeting of a series
of Honors Seminars on Africa will
take place at 8 p.m. Tuesday in
Rm. 407, Mason Hall. Prof. Henry
L. Bretton of the political science
department will direct the discus-
sion group, which is open to all
students in honors program and
their guests.

TO g&Q 1 s

11

: s

No

I

i

.-
.r .
:r
r 3:<

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