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October 09, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-09
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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-~~- -

A Moder Analysi

Continued from Page Elven
hand, and motivates him to act
morally on the other, then it must
be said to have, at least, a func-
tional worth which cannot be
overlooked.
Perhaps we might feel now why
┬▒ant did not classify the Moral
argument in the same manner in.
which he considered the- three
othet arguments for the existence
of God.
Although the Moral argument
may indeed fail for the reasons
which I have indicated, it may
nevertheless have some sort of
value, and this value lies in the
nature of, the argument which
differnetiates it from the three
other arguments. The Moral argu-
ment has reference to the action
of the individual; it is intended to
give objective validity and san-

tion to morality, and, in this sense,
attempts to "make men moral."
The Moral argument has an ef-
fect, its acceptance may make a
difference in human activities and
relations. Perhaps it is because
this effect is to be so desired that
Kant comments in the introduc-
tion to the second edition of his
"Critique" that he will be willing
to suspend reason in order to
make room for faith.
Natural theology appeals to
man to be rational; however, the
'rationality' of its arguments fail.
Yet if an individual considers the
existence of Clod as something
personal to himself, his accept-
ance of the assertion of that exist-
ence will be based upon a faith
which effects his actions and
gives to him a sense of meaning-
fulness, and will not be forfeited
because abstract doctrines, sup-'

s of.God
posed to support the assertion,
have been shown to be self-con-
tradictory or unverifiable.
If we wish to give some sort of
justification forhe acceptance of
the proposition that Clod exists,
it seems futile to accept this on
either logical or supposedly "ob-
jective" grounds. It seems to me
that God's existence should be dis-
cussed in terms of the relation of
the acceptance of the proposition
to individual feelings and actions,
and these, in turn, upon its ef-
fects upon society. It then seems
that we may investigate empirical.
data of consciousness and be-
havior rather than outright onto-
logical notions. It is thus upon
psychological a n d sociological
grounds rather than upon abstract
ontological notions that I feel
fundamental religious beliefs may
be established.

Continued from Page Nine
millions of their fellow citizens sit-
ting by their TV sets, vicariously
moan with a similar sensual pleas-
ure. Their happiness would 'be
complete were At not for the
loneliness within them-an arti-
fAcial loneliness created by the in-
applicable doctrines of humanist
educators.
E LIBERAL education cannot
be of use in this age; its injec-
tion into the educational process
must result in confusion and a
search for values which cannot
help but aggravate the personal
and international tensions under
which we now live. The humani-
ties must, in general, be altered,
perhaps eliminated, if they cannot
be brought up to date.
This is not to say that human-
ist scholars must be put out of
work. On the contrary, a limited

Liberal Education

amount of study in the humanities
shall always be permitted, if hu-
manists in the future show them-
selves as well behaved as they do
now. Even today a reasonable un-
derstanding between these schol-
ars and the secular powers has
resulted in a tightening of the
boundaries of university areas.
Soon a stint at college, including,
perhaps, a glance at the humani-
ties, will be no more emotionally
trying than going to the zoo.
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