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October 09, 1960 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-10-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

+ord Hurls 10-0 Victory

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Syracuse Rolls On

(Continued from Page 1)
achieved what Richardson did.
And that goes for the slam as well
as the RBI's.
Little Bobby is the seventh
player -- sixth Yankee - ever to
hit a bases-loaded home run in
the World Series. But none of the
others did it in vast Yankee
Stadium.
Only Three Homers
In six seasons in the majors, the
5-foot-8 second baseman has hit
only three home runs. He's a
"smart" hitter, the kind of 'little
guy' Manager Casey Stengel likes
-- laying town bunts, moving the
runners.
ftet is, when he came up against
reliever Clem Labine with the

bases loaded yesterday, he was
supposed to lay down a bunt. But
he fouled it off. He fouled off
two more pitches, then laid a 3-2
pitch in the left field stands,
"I knew I hit it good," said the
smiling, soft-spoken South Caro-
linian, "but when I rounded first
base, I thought the left fielder had
caught it.
"I don't think I've ever hit
even a three-run homer before,
except maybe at Denver, where it's
a mile high."
Sky High
Things went sky high with this
one. And after striking out against
Fred Green in the third inning,
Richardson, the No. 7 man in
Stengel's batting order, lined al

two-run single off Red Witt in
the fourth.
That gave him his sixth RBI.
The best anyone had been able
to do in one series game before
was five, and it wasn't just any-
one, it was Yankees Tony Lazzeri
and Lou Gehrig in the 1936 series
against the New York Giants,
Ted Kluszewski of the Chicago
White Sox against Los Angeles
last October, and Mantle in Thurs-
day's game. No National Leaguer
has ever done it.
Mantle had two singles, the
home run (his second off Green)
and a ground rule double in his
first four trips to the plate.
"They just bombed us," said
Murtaugh, who was 43 years old
today.°
"A birthday present like this
doesn't make you feel any young-
er.
Shutout, Too!
PITTSBURGH (N) AB R H Rbi PO A

8 F

today's terrific dollar value!

Virdon ef
Groat as
Clemente ri
Stuart lb
Cimou If
Smith
Hoak 3b
Mazeroski 2b
Mizell p
Labine Ip
Green p
Witt p
a-Baker
Cheney p
b-Schofield
Gibbon p
Totals
NEW YORK (A)
Cerv if
Marls rf
Berra rf
Mantle ef
Skowron lb
McDougald 3b
Howard c
Richardson 2b
Kubek ss
Ford
Totals

By The Associated Press
WORCESTER, Mass.-Syracuse
was shocked by upstart Holy Cross
which outplayed the nation's No.
1 football team for 41, minutes,
rallied behind its mighty defense
and fullback Art Baker for a 15-6
victory yesterday.
The Orangemen felt their pres-
tige and a 13-game winning streak
tottering until tackle Tom Gilburg
boomed a conversion kick to de-
cide the contest with one second
left in the third quarter. Sopho-
more halfback John Mackey had
dragged the Crusaders' quarter-
back-leader Bill Joern the final
yard into the end zone for the
touchdown.
The Orangemen's defense, first
in the country, held on their 4-
yard line to stem a fourth period
Crusader surge from the Holy
Cross 20.
Eleven seconds before the final
gun the previously awesome Syra-
cuse attack, which had sputtered
and fizzled before the hard-rush-
ing Crusader forwards, clicked on
a 25-yard scoring pass, from Dick
Easterly to Ernie Davis, making
the final tally misleading.
** *
WASHINGTON ST. 21, CALIF. 21
BERKELEY-Washington State
parlayed Keith Lincoln's running
and Mel Melin's throwing into a
come-from-behind 21-21 tie with
California in the last 1'2 minutes
of their football game yesterday,
with Lincoln's two-point con-
version climaxing the contest.
BAYLOR 28, ARKANSAS 14
FAYETTEVILaLE, Ark. -- Bay-
lor's Bears ran and passed the Ar-
kansas Razorbacks ragged yester-
day for a 28-14 Southwest Confer-
ence football victory which broke
an eight-gamie winning streak for
Arkansas.
NO. CAROLINA 12, N. DAME 7
CHAPEL HILL-Twice-beaten
North Carolina struck for two sec-
ond period touchdowns and with-
stood a desperate second half
rally yesterday to defeat Notre
Dame, 12-7, in an intersectional
football battle on a rain-soaked
field, the first victory for the
Tar Heels in the 11-game series.
Notre Dame, harrassed by pass
interceptions, drove past the North

Carolina 20-yard line five tihes
before finally scoring late in the
final period.
MISSOURI 34, AIR FORCE 9
DENVER - Halfback Don
Smith's 90-yard touchdown trip
on a punt return capped a 20
point second quarter for Missouri
as the unbeaten Tigers sent Air
Force reeling to its first defeat,
34-8, yesterday.
PENN STATE 27, ARMY 16
WESTPOINT-Halfback Jim
Kerr scored three touchdowns yes-
terday for a comeback Penn State
team which spoiled Army's un-
beaten record and homecoming
celebration, 27-16, as rival Navy
rolled on against SMU.
WASHINGTON 29, STANFORD 10
STANFORD-Washington All-
America Quarterback Bob Schlor-
edt passed for one touchdown and
ran for another yesterday as the
resurging Huskies battered fum-
bling Stanford, 29-10, in their na-
tionally televised Big Five battle,
recovering from last week's upset
15-14 loss to Navy.
Pro Standings
NFL
WESTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet.
Baltimore 2 0 0 1.000
Chicago 1 1 0 .500
Green Day 1 1 0 .500
San Francisco 1 1 0 .000
Detroit 0 1 0 .000
Dallas 0 2 0 .000
Los Angeles 0 2 0 .000
EASTERN DIVISION
Cleveland 2 'E0E0 1.000
New York 2 0 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500
Washington 0 1 0 .000
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Green Bay
Dallas at Washington
Los Angeles at Chicago
New York at Pittsburgh
St. Louis at Philadelphia
San Francisco at Detroit
NHL
W L T Pts. GF GA
New York 2 0 0 4 7 3
Chicago 1 0 1 3 5 3
Montreal 1 0 1 3 6 1
Boston 0 1 1 1 3 S
Detroit 0 1 1 1 3 5
Toronto 0 2 0 0 2 10
LAST NIGHT'S GAMES
New York 5, Toronto 2
Boston 1, Montreal 1
Only games scheduled

31 0 4 0 24 9

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39 10 16 10 27 15

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a-Grounded out for Wtt in 6th.
b-Lined out for Cheney in 8th.

Pittsburgh (N)
New York (A)

000 000 000- 0
600 400 00x-10

E--Kubek. DP--Ford, Richardson and
Skowron. LOB--Pittsburgh (N) 5, New
York (A) 9. 2B-Virdon, Mantle. HR-
Richardson, Mantle.

Ford (W)
MJzel (L)
Labine
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SWitt
Cheney
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' UM, M. M , S
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
r T. r

Collin SoUp
STATE and LIBERTY

LOOK TO KESSEL'S FOR FASHION

(Continued from Page 4)
open October 19 with actress-author IT-'
ka Chase, to be followed by Burgess
Meredith, Marcel Marceau, Agnes De-
Mille, Herb Shriner and Basil Rath-
bone. Students are offered a special rate
in the second balcony of 13.00 for the
complete course. There is also a 50 per
cent saving by buying season tickets
in the reserved sections, main floor
and first balcony. Tickets for indi-'
vidual performances will go on sale
October 17.
EventsM onday
Radiation Laboratory Lecture Series:
"Anisotropic Magneto Plasmas" is the
title of the lecture to be given by Dr.
Lewis Gold of the Radiation Laboratory
on Mon., Oct. 10 at 4:00 p.m. in E.
Engineering, 2084.
Mon., Oct. 10, 4:00 p.m., Rm. 1300
Chemistry Bldg. Dr. v. i. Spitsyn, Di-a
rector, Institute of Physical Chemistry,I
Academy of Sciences of the U.S.S.R. will'
speak on "New Data on the Influence
of External Radiation on Heterogeneous
Chemical Processes."
Engineering Mechanics Seminar. Mon.
Oct. 10 at 4:00 p.m. in Rb. 305 West
Engineering Bldg. Prof. C. S. Yih will

speak on "Cambridge As I
Coffee will be served In
Engineering at 3:30 p.m.

k k-
r #

Know it."
201 West

Automatic Programming and Nu-
merical Analysis Seminar. "Eigenvalues
of Trl-Diagonal Matrices" will be dis-
cussed by R. C. F. Bartels on Mon.,
Oct. 10 at 4 p.m. in 318 W. Engineering.
Events Tuesday
Faculty Recital: Oliver Edel, Prof.
of violinncello and Chamber Music and
Cellist of the Stanley Quartet, will pre-
sent with commentary "The Six Suites
for violoncello (Unaccompanied)" by
J. S. Bach. The first of the series of
three concerts will be performed on
Tues. Oct. 11, at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. A,
Angell Hall, the program to include
Suite LI n CG major and Suite 11, in D
minor. The second and third programs
are scheduled for 8:30 p.m. in Angell
Hall, the second on Thurs., Nov. 10,
and the third on Dec. 6. Open to the
general public.
Doctoral Examination for Charles
Wesley Jackson, Jr., Psychology; thesis:
"An Exploratory Study of the Role of
Suggestion in Research on Sensory De-
privation," Tues., Oct. 11, 7615 Haven
Hall, at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, E. L.
Kelly.
AN ORIGINAL BY

Doctoral Examination for Bruce Bug-
bee, History; thesis: "The Early Ameri-
can Law of Intellectual Property: The
Historical Foundations of the United
States Patent and Copyright Systems,"
Tues.. Oct. 11, 3609 Haven Hall, at
9:00 a.m. Chairman, W. R. Leslie.
Placement N Aotices
City of St. Paul, Minnesota-Civil
Service-Dental Hygienist for public
school work. Applications for exam
mustbe filed not later than November
7. Open to non-residents,
Please call the Bureau of Appoint-
ments,,Rm. 4021, Admin. Bldg., Ext.
3371 for further information.
INTERVIEWS
OCT. 13
Prudential Insurance Co. of America
-Mr. W. H. Klingbell of Detroit will
interview men & woman with degrees
in liberal arts,.BusAdmin, Law or Edu-
cation for Insurance Sales positions in
Detroit. Interested seniors please call
the Bureau of Appointments, Ext. 3371.
OCT. 14
Tennessee Valley Authority; Knox-
ville, Tenn. Mr. Howard Hill will inter-
view M. and PhD candidates (Feb. &
June 1961) in Economics and Public
Administration for positions in Knox-
ville and Chattanooga. U.S. citizens or
students who have applied for Immi-
gration status, please contact the Bu-
reau of Appointments, Ext. 3371 to be
scheduled for interviews.

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Organization
Notices

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USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only. HELP WANTED
Organizations planning to be active for
the fall semester should register by SECRETARIAL help wanted. Qualifle
OCTOBER 10, 1960. Forms available, secretary needed in modern, new, we
3011 Student Activities Building. equipped office. Call NO 5-6103
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student NO 2-2761. Hl
Club, Orientation at 5:30 p.m,, Supper
at 6 p.m., Business meeting. Initiation SALES PERSON in work part-time i
for new members, Oct. 9, 1511 Washte- wallpaper department of local pair
naw. store. Interior decorating experienc
* "** not necessary, but preferred. Ma
Newman Club, Communion Break- qualifications to Anderson Paint C
fast, Speaker: Prof. Albert Wheeler, 300 E. Washington, Ann Arbor. H
Oct. 9, 10:30 a.m., 331 Thompson, S
* * * 'BIKES and SCOOTERS
Riding Club, Open riding, Oct. 11,
6:50 p.m., WAB, for ride to Stable. Call 1958 LAMBRETTA 150 LD. Mint cond
Lee Sonne, NO 2-3122 for information. tion. Must see to appreciate it. Ca
* * * NO 5-8459.
Student Zionist Organization, Oct.
10, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St. Speaker: Areyh LAMBRETTA MOTOR SCOOTER. 150-1
Simon, National Director, "Zionism Excellent condition, $155. Call N
and the American Jew." All welcome. 2-7395 after 6 p.m. 2

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