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September 29, 1960 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

:X

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,

THE MICIHGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,

lass Interception Sparks ATO
sigma Nu Air Attack Wins

Roman Tells Story of a Minor Leaguer

I

By BOB ZALISK
and ROY WHANG
Alpha Tau Omega squeaked
past Theta Chi, 6-0, in the first
overtime game of this year's I-M
schedule, yesterday in social fra-
ternty 'A' action.
Mitch Phillips broke the ice for
ATO in the seesaw conflict when
he scopped up a twice-deflected
pass and carried it to the one-
foot line. After two unsuccessful
attempts for the TD, quarterback
Rollin Douma hit Dan Molhock in
the end zone to put the game in
the bag for ATO.
Sigma Nu exploded out of a
0-0 half-time deadlock with Sigma
Phi to trounce the Sig Phi's, 22-0.
In the first play of the second
half, SN's Bryant Ewing made a
leaping dive for quarterback Shan
Griffith's long pass and crashed
to the ground for the touchdown.
Griffith clicked again to Ewing,
who made a repeat performance
for the extra points in grabbing
Griffith's pass after a frantic Sig
Phi defender had knocked it away.
In other play, Trigon trimmed
Theta Delta Chi, 14-6, in a hard-

fought battle. Behind 6-0 at the
half, Trigon's Tom Addison even-
ed , the score in the opening
minutes by intercepting a Theta
Delt pass and running for a touch-
down on the first play. Trigon
soon regained the lead on a long
pass play and stayed out in front
by chalking up the fnal two extra
points.
A bitterly fought match between
Beta Theta Pi and Theta Xi ended
in a 2-0 victory for the Betas. Don
Corriere decided the game when
he pushed the opposition back
for a safety.
The Delta Upsilon and Acacia
battle ended n victory for the
DU's through Captain Dave Ran-
dall's 35-yd. touchdown pass to
Arnie Morawa, and Gary Joachin's
TD run.
Psi Upsilon walked-over Alpha
Delta Phi 10-0 through a safety
in the first half and a short
touchdown pass by Tom Ahren in
the second half.
Sigma Chi's two platoon sub-
stitution system and the bull-like
rushing of Phi Delta Theta's 245-
pound John Manz, were highlights

of respective games last night.
The precision passing of Bill Reed
to glue-fingered receivers, Bob
Roberts, Guy Briggs and Bob
Young accounted for 18 points of
a 26-0 defeat over Lambda Chi
Alpha.
Meanwhile, the Phi Delt's bigF
John Manz busily chopped his
way through the front line pha-
lanx of a courageous Phi Gamma
Delta team. Quickly grabbing a
stray Phi Gam pass, Rick Board-
man raced to the end zone for
the lone TD of the game. Also uti-
lized was mercurial back Tom
Gibson, as the Phi Delts eked out
a 6-0 win. Sportsmanship and .'
spirted play typified the evening '
games, three of which were not
played because of absent teams.
I-M SCORES
FOOTBALL
SOCIAL FRATERNITY "A"
Beta Theta Pi 2, Thet Xi 0
Delta Tau Delta 28, Zeta Psi 0
Trigon 14, Theta Delta Chi 6
Phi Delta Theta 14, Tau Delta Phi 0
Delta Epsilon 12. Acacia 0
Chi Phi 12, Pi Lambda Phi 0
Psi Epsilon 10, Alpha Delta Phi 0
Alpha Tau Omega 6, Theta Chi 0
Sigma Nu 24, Sigma Phi 0
Delta Chi beat Kappa Alpha Psi (for-
feit) u f
Phi Sigma Delta 26, Tau Kappa Epsi
ion 0
SOCIAL FRATERNITY "B"
Theta Chi 6, Phi Epsilon Pi 0
Sigma Alpha Mu beat Delta Chi
(forfeit)
Alpha Kappa Lambda vs. Acacia (no?
game)
Tau Delta Phi vs. Phi Kappa Psi (no
game) DETROIT-BU
Phi Sigma Kappa 14, Alpha Delta Phi just complet
6
Beta Theta Pi 22, Delta Sigma Phi 0 to be in a
Phi Delta Theta 6, Phi Gamma Delta complete his
0
Sigma Chi 26, Lambda Chi Alpha 0

By BRIAN MacCLOWRY
Last spring Wolverine first base-
man Bill Roman was whisked off
campus by the Detroit Tigers for
$30,000, and assigned to Birming-
ham of the Class AA Southern As-
sociation.
After hitting .317 in 17 games
for the Barons he was reassigned
to the Durham club of the Class B
Carolina league.
How does it feel to be handed a
fat contract one minute and the
next minute find yourself playing
baseball in the so-called "bushes'?
Batted .292
Roman, who hit .292 with four
home runs and 43 RBI's for Dur-
ham, grinned as he told of some
of the bizarre incidents which are
typical of minor league baseball.
"In one game," he recalled, "our
club committed four errors on one
play and allowed four unearned
runs to score. I remember the play
very well because I made two of
the errors."
"One other time," he continued,
"our catcher hit a ball into deep
right field that landed on top of
the cinder block wall and stayed
there. The umpires had a heck of
a time deciding whether to rule it
a double or a home run."
'Poor Players' .
And after having the lavish
Michigan training quarters at his
disposal for four years, Roman
sadly related the tale of the poor
ballplayer who gets hurt in the
Carolina league.
"When a ballplayer gets hurt in
the Carolina league he practically
has to take care of himself," he
related. "There are no whirlpool
baths, no heat lamps, and no rub-
down tables, and besides, the team

bus usually left right after the
game anyway."
Despite all this, Roman has "no
ragrets whatsoever" about sign-
ing the Tiger pact. Undoubtedly
he was influenced by the fact that
he could return to school in the
off season and still get his degree
in aeronautical engineering in
three semesters.
Didn't Sign
The big first baseman could
have signed a lucrative contract
directly out of high school but was
influenced by his parents to con-
tinue his schooling at Michigan.
"I'm very happy now that my
parents talked me out of signing,"
he said. "I feel I learned as much
baseball playing under Don Lund
as I could have in any minor
league, and I got my schooling in
besides."
Roman listed two things he
thuoght were the big differences
between college and professional
baseball.
"When you know you're playing
for money it seems to make you
put out a little more, to play a
little harder."
Good Pitching
"Also," he continued, "in pro-
fessional baseball you face good
pitching every day while in col-
lege you may face only one good
pitcher a week."
Roman had no trouble recalling
his best and worst days at the
plate. They both came during
doubleheaders.
"In one doubleheader I had five
for seven, including two triples,
two doubles and a single. In the
other I went zero for eight. That
last one was a long day."
Although he had offers from

seven other major league clubs,
Roman chose the Tigers because
he felt that he would be able to
rise quickest in the Tiger organi-
zation.
Another factor that might have
had something to do with it, he
admitted, was that the Tigers of-
fered him as much money as any
of the other clubs.
It might not be too long before
Michigan followers see Roman in
Tiger uniform. His contract for
next year has been purchased by
Denver of the Amercian Associa-
tion, although he will report to
Tigertown for spring training.
.Williams In
Farewl;
Hits Homer
BOSTON (M - The seventhj
place Boston Red Sox wound up
the American League season yes-
terday with a 5-4 decision over
the second place Baltimore Ori-
oles but the result was a mere
incident to most fans.
For Ted Williams, baseball's
nonpareil hitter over the last two
decades, bade his farewell as a
player in typical fashion.
To a tumultuous reception by
the fans he walloped a monster
home run more than 400 feet over
the bullpen in centerfield.
It was his 29th of the year and
the 52 1st of his illustrious, fre-
quently interrupted career.
Every time he came to bat he
was cheered and applauded.
Then, in the eighth inning, with
the count 1-1 he smashed the last
homer of his career at Fenway
Park.
The fans chanted "We want
Williams" as play was delayed
fully three minutes. He didn't
come out of the dugout until the
Sox took the field for the ninth
inning.
Then he received another great
ovation. As soon as the applause
died he was replaced by Carroll
Hardy, and in typical fashion,
hurried from the field to another
long, loud cheer.

4

I

I

AUTHENTIC
SHIRTS

SOUND-Ex-Wolverine first baseman Bill Roman has
ed his first season in professional baseball and hopes
Tiger uniform soon. He has returned to school to
program in aeronautical engineering.

PEUGEOT
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Stanford Brothers
Authorized Renault-Peugeot Dealers
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Lincoln Park - Outer Dr. of Fort

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Yankees Lose Star Catcher

I

a

I.

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By The Associated Press
The New York Yankees may
have lost catcher Elston Howard
for the World Series while winning
ther 12th in a row and tying the
American League home run re-
cord with a 6-3 decision at Wash-
ington last night.
Howard suffered a possible
broken finger when struck by a
foul ball, off Zorro Versalles' bat
in the first inning. The injured
ring finger on his right hand will
be X-rayed in New York today.
The World Seres opens in six days
at Pittsburgh.
While the Yankees worried over
Howard, baseball bade farewell to
Ted Williams. The Big Guy, called
it quits wth three games left on
Boston's schedule-after hitting
his 521st home run on his final
at bat in the Red Sox' 5-4 victory

Notice

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in many interesting i
shades and patterns.
as advertised in Playboy
$5.00 UP
607 E. Liberty Street-Next to the Michigon Theatre)

1960--61
STUDENT DIRECTORY
All organizations that wish to appear in
the Directory must register in the Office

over Baltimore
The loss cut
place edge over

at Fenway Park.
the Oroles second
Chicago to a half-

i

Iajor League
Standings

I

game in the AL standings. The
White Sox, who re-signed Manager
Lapez for 1961, were idle. Kansas
City made it three straight over
Cleveland, beating the Indians,
4-0, behind Ned Garver's three-
hit pitching.
In the National League, where
the champion Pirates had a day
off, Milwaukee defeated Philadel-
phia, 9-3, with Lew Burdette
winning his 19th.
The Chicago Cubs beat San
Francisco 6-3, locking the fifth
place Giants in the second divi-
sion.
Mickey Mantle moved past
teammate Roger Maris for the AL
home run lead by hitting his 39th
and 40th, and Cletus Boyer belted
his 14th as the Yanks tied the
league homer record of 190 they
set in 1956. They have three games
left, against Boston at New York.
The Major League record is 221,
held by the 1947 New York Giants
and 1956 Cincinnati Reds.
Ford Wins
Whitey Ford (12-9), a possible
opening game choice by Manager
Casey Stengel in the World Series,
was the winner, giving up five hits
and one earned run-Bob Allison's
15th homer - in a five-inning
tune-up. Chuck Stobbs (12-7) was
the loser. He was tagged for all
three home runs as the AL champs
rolled up their longest winning
streak since 1954.
Williams' home run, his 29th of
the season, was a 450-foot blast
in the eighth inning off loser
Jack Fisher (12-11). The Red Sox
won it in the ninth on an error
by Billy Klaus. Mike Fornieles
(10-5) was the winning pitcher
in his 70th appearance, breaking
the AL record set by Boston's El-
lis Kinder in 1953.
Pushed to the background by
PAPER-BOUND
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OVERBECK'S
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GRID SELECTIONS
While much attention will be centered on the important Big
Ten games that will pit some of the title favorites against tough
opposition, the armed forces invade the west as Navy takes on third
ranked Washington and Army tries to continue their high scoring
attack against California.
Decide who you think will win these games as well as the
other games around the nation, and include the score of the all-
important Michigan-Michigan State game, and send your entry
blank to .Grid Picks, Michigan Daily, 420 .Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
or return it by hand to the main office of the Daily on the second
floor. Entries may be picked up here and must be in no later than
Friday midnight to be eligible.
The person with the most correct games will be the winner of
two free tickets to the Michigan Theater, now showing "Carry On

Williams' sudden good-bye was
the return of outfielder Jackie
Jensen, who agreed to terms for
1961 with the Red Sox after "re-
tiring" from baseball for a year.
Ed Mathews hit his 39th homer
and Del Crandall drove in three
runs for the Braves

I

of Student Affairs,

Rm. 3011 Student

NATIONAL

Activities Building before September 29.

"-""""""""

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-

Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia

LEAGUE
W L Pect.
93 '58 .616
87 64 .576
85 64 .571
79 70 .530
76 75 .503
67 84 .444
59 92 .391
56 95 .371

GB
6
7
13
17
26
34
37

Nurse"
Here are this week's Grid Picks:
1. MICHIGAN at Michigan 10.
State (score) 11.
2. West Virgina at Illinois 12.
3. Indiana at Minnesota 13.
4. Iowa at Northwestern 14.
5. Marquette at Wisconsin X15.
6, Purdue at Notre Dame 16.
7. Southern California at Ohio .17.
State 18.-
8. Syracuse at Kansas 19.
9. Iowa St. at Nebraska 20.

Army at California
Navy at Washington
Columbia at Princeton
Missouri at Penn State
Penn at Dartmouth
Duke at Maryland
Georgia Tech at Florida
VPI at Clemson
Virginia at N. Carolina St.
Stanford at Air Force
Pittsburgh at Oklahoma

ri

. .... .

"It has been my observation that fraternity
its participants, this from the standpoint
dom, and human dignity.

life bestows great benefits upon
of brotherhood, individual free-
Tom C. Clark
Associate Justice
United States Supreme Court

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 9, Philadelphia 3
Chicago 6, San Francisco 3
St. Louis at Los Angeles (N)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
St. Louis at Los Angeles (11 p.m.)
Only game scheduled

AMERICAN

New York
Baltimore
Chicago
Cleveland
Washington
Detroit
Boston
Kansas City

LEAGUE
WV L Pct.
94 57 .623
87 65 .572
86 65 .570
74 77 .490
73 79 .480
69 82 .457
65 86 .430
57 94 .375

GB
7 '
8
20
21%
25
29
37

The STAMP CENTER
Olympics issues now available
* Thousands of used and mint U.S. and foreign stamps
* STAMPS, ACCESSORIES, ALBUMS

It

.-------------- ------------
FRATERNITY RUSHING OCT. 2-OCT.16
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, Oct. 2, 2-5 P.M. and 7-9:30 P.M.
Monday, Oct. 3, 7-9:30 P.M.
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 7:9:30 P.M.
All Michigan fraternities are open to you at these hours. You need no Invitation to visit them.,
RUSH Today .... 2-5 P.M. Monday .. . 2-5 P.M.
REGISTRATION: Friday . ..9. 2-5 P.M. Tuesday ... 2-5 P.M.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 6, Washington 3
Boston 5, Baltimore 4
Kansas City 4, Cleveland 0
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
No games scheduled

Hours: Monday and Friday 1-9 P.M.
Saturday 9-6 P.M.

MARSHALL'S
BOOK SHOP
211 S. State

L i - - ........... ... . ... . . .. . ... ,

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their rugged, sturdy character
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make them a perennial favorite.
from 79.50

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