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September 27, 1960 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

fBER 27, 1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE:
Teams Prefer Spartans to Wolverines

NFL Standings

AFL Standings

WESTERN DIVISION
Chicago 1 0 0
Baltimore 1 0 0
Detroit 0 0 0
Dallas 0 1 0
San Francisco 0 0 0
Los Angeles 0 0 0
Green Say 0 0 A

Pct.
1.000
1.060
.000
.000
.000
.000
.000

By FRED STEINHARDT .
As Michigan makes preparations
for its annual showdown against,
the cornfed huskies from East
Lansing this week, a glance at
National Football League rosters,
shows that the Spartans are far
ahead of the Wolverines in pro-
ducing pro players.
At latest count ,there are fifteen
MSU praduates on NFL teams as
opposed to only five Wolverines.
Combined, the two schools are
represented on every club except
Pittsburgh, Los Angeles, and St.
Louis.
Five Liona
As might be expected, the De-
troit Lions top the list with five,
four from State and one from
Michigan. The Green Bay Packers
follow up with four and the Dallas
Cowboys and Cleveland Browns
with two. Chicago, Baltimore, San
Francisco, New York, Philadelphia,
and Washington have one apiece.
The lone Michigan man on the
Lions is Terry Barr ('56), who has
proven his versatility by playing
both offensive and defensive back.
Touted as the finest defensive
back to come out of the Big 10
in years, he played a vital role in
the Lions historic championship
drive in 1957 and made several
all-Pro teams. After a ragged start
ion defense last season, he was
converted to a pass receiver by
Coach George Wilson and per-
formed credibly. Converted to a
running back this year, he has
played well during the exhibition
season and his great speed is ex-
pected to shore up the Lion at-
tack.
MSU Alums

kicked off, and had a punting
average of over 40 yards. He is,
credited with some of the most
fantastic catches witnessed in
Michigan Stadium. On defense he
was a demon who neutralized
three and four opposing blockers.
He was a two year all-American.
In pro ball Kramer has been
handicapped by a troublesome7
knee and the great degree of
specialization which hurts the all
around college performer and
helps the player especially gifted
in one particular phase of the
game. He is, however, considered'
a most reliable and tough com-
petitor.
Kramer is joined on the Packers
by MSU alumni end Bill Quinlan,
tackle Norm Masters, and center
Dan Currie. Currie was an all-
American on the 1957 State power-
house that pulverized Michigan
35-6.
A teammate of Currie on the
1957 team, Walt Kowalczyk was
recently drafted from the Lions
in an inter-league maneuver to
strengthen the new Dallas Cow-
boys. He played with the Phila-
delphia Eagles in 1968-9 and was
traded to Detroit this summer.
Another former Spartan, Leroy
Bolden, went to the Cowboys from
Cleveland.
Kowalczyks old running mate
Clarence Peaks is a back on the
Eagles.

fintst running backs in recent
years ('58) is attempting a come-
back for the San Francisco 49ers
after sitting out last season while
his knee was mending. Pace is big
(210 lbs.) and very fast (:09.6
in the 100 yard dash) and could
develope into a real pro standout.
He has a very good sense of bal-
ance and is hard to bring down.
Michigan's other two players
both perform for the Cleveland
Browns and coach Paul Brown.
John Morrow plays offensive
center and Bob Ptacek ('58) is
a reserve back,
At Ann Arbor, the versatile
Ptacek played every backfield,

single
the T.
The
league
Colts;

wing and quarterback

in

WESTERN DIVISION
W L T
Houston 2 1 0
New York 2 10
Boston 1 2 0
Buffalo 1 2 0
EASTERN DIVISION
WL T
Denver 2 1 0
Dallas 2 1,0
Los Angeles 1 2 0
Oakland 1 2 0
LAST WEEK'S SCORES
Oakland 14, Houston 13
Dallas 17, Los Angeles 0

Pct.
.667
.$67
.333
.333
Pct.
.687
.667
.333
'333

Other Spartans
other MSU alumni in the
are linemen Palmer Pyle,
Elison Kelly, Giants; and

Fran O'Brien, Browns. Both Vic
Zucco and Bert Zagers play de-
ftnsive back, Zucco for the Bears
and Zagers for the Washington
Redskins.
Future professional stars will
get anopportunity to test their
mettle before a selldut crowd of
76,000 Saturday at East Lansing.
Precedent has proven that stars
of the Michigan-Michigan State
rivalry have pretty fair chances
of distinguishing themselves in
pro ranks.

EASTERN DIVISION
W L T Pet.
Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000
Pittsburgh 1 0 0 1.000
St. Louis 1 0 0 1.000
New York 1 0 0 1.000
Washington 0 1 0 .000
LAST WEEK'S SCORES
Chicago 17, Green Bay 14
Baltimore 20, Washington 0
Cleveland 41, Philadelphia 24
New York 21, San Francisco 19
Pittsburgh 35, Dallas 28
St. Louis 43, Los Angeles 21
Daily Classifieds
Bring Results

PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

position in Bennie

Oosterbaan's

p

THAT'S OUR* BOY -- One of Michigan's great halfbacks of
recent years was Jim Pace, here shown eluding Northwestern
tacklers in the 1957 meeting, by virtue of his tremendous speed
(:09.6 in the 100-yard dash). Pace is one of five ex-Wolverines
playing with the National Football League. Pace who is with
the San Francisco 49ers hopes to regain his old form after
sitting out last season with a knee injury. If he does then
opposition tacklers will probably have as hard a time stopping
him as Northwestern did.
Yanks Beat Nats, 4-2;
White Sox Whip Tigers

w

REMODELING SPECIAL
This WeekOnly

SKIRTS and PANTS

By The Associated Press
The American League cham-
pion New York Yankees rolled
to their 10th straight victory-
longest in the majors this season
-with a 4-2, 10-inning decision
at Washington last night while
Last Chance
Students who have not yet
picked up their season tickets
have only three days left to do
so. Ticket Manager Don Weir
has set 4:30 p.m. Friday as the
ticket deadline.
the Chicago White Box, scram-
bling for the leftovers, tied idle
Baltimore for second place,
The Box, trying to keep intact
Manager Al Lopez' record of never
having finished lower than second,
defeated Detroit 6-3. Cleveland re-
tained a 112-game edge over
Washington for fourth place de-
spite a 6-1 loss at Kansas City in
the only other game scheduled in
the AL.
In the National League, where
the Pittsburgh Pirates have wrap-
ped up their first flag in 33 years,
only one game was scheduled,
Ban Francisco at Los Angeles. The
Dodgers led 2-0 after five innings
of play.
The Yankees blew a 2-0 lead
when Harmon Killebrew tied it
with his 31st home run in the

seventh inning, off rookie Bill
Stafford. But the champs bounced
back for their longest streak in
two years with two runs in the
10th on Bob Crev's double, a walk
and a tie-breaking single by
pinch-hitter Hector Lopez.
Dale Long, who homered in the
second inning capped the rally
with a single off loser Pedro Ra-
mos (11-17). Duke Maas (3-1)
was the winner, giving up one hit
in his two relief innings.
Minnie Minoso had three hits,
one his 20th home run, and drove
in two runs for the White Sox
along with Luis Apariclo. Frank
Baumann (13-6), who had only a
13-8 record for five years in the
majors before this season, was
the winner. Bill Fischer (8-8) lost
it.
Bud Daley won his 16th for the
A's with a four-hitter as he beat
the Indians for the first time in
three decisions this year.
The Athletics backed up his
efforts with a 14-hit attack that
featured a home run by Pete Daley
and a 3-for-4 performance by
Jerry Lumpe, who rapped a double
and two singles.
Dick Stigman (5-11) started for
Cleveland and gave up three ol
the Kansas City runs in five
innings. He was followed by Dor
Newcombe and Carl Mathias.

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The battle for the quarterback
post vacated by Tobin Rote was
fought between former Michigan
State teammates Jim Ninowski and
Earl Morrall, both of whom made
all-American in College. At this
time, Ninowski, a native Detroiter,
appears to have won the job.
Gary Lowe, another Spartan, is
a defensive back and giant end
Sammy Williams can be used both
ways and as a placekicker. Wil-
liams was a near unanimous all-
American in 1958 and played a
major part in the hard fought 12-
12 tie in the Michigan game that
year.
Ron Kramer ('56), Michigan's
representative on the Green Bay
Packers, hardly needs an intro-
duction ot Wolverine fans. The
best athlete to come to Ann Arbor ,j
for many years, Kramer is con-
sidered by some observers to be!
the finest Michigan has ever had.
His supporters certainly have a
lot of ground to stand on. He won
nine varsity letters; three in track
(shotputter), three in basketball
(in which he was a fearsome re-
bounder and a 20 point man), and
three in football,
Kramer placekicked very well,

Name U.S.
II
Davis Cup
Challengerps
NEW YORK UP) - The United
States yesterday named a trio of
youngsters-Earl Buchholz, Chuck
McKinley and Dennis Ralston -
to team with veterans Bernard
Bartzen and Barry MacKay in
the campaign to recover the Davis
Cup from Australia.
The tennis squad, headed by
Capt. David Freed, will leave for
Australia around October 31 for
appearances in various Australian
state tournaments and two inter-
zone matches leading to the chal-
lenge round.
The Americans, who clinched
their zone title a week ago, will
play the Philippines, the Eastern
Zone Champions, and if victorious,
will take on Italy's European win-
ners for the right to meet Austra-
lia Dates and sites haven't been
set.
The Challenge Round is sched-
uled at Sydney December 26-28.

I

DRY CLEANED and PRESSED
1/3 OFF

THlE .NEWEST
MOST BEAUTIFUL
PORTABLE EVER SEEN
REMINGTON!1
Thee days a typewriter is a
mtwt for every college stu-
dent. Act now and you can
rent or buy a new Remington
Portable for lots less than
you think! And you get free
the new Remington COLOR
rEY Touch Typing Course
plus a handy carrying case
for weekend trips.
-Come in now
MORRILuLS
314 South State

H

I

CASH AND CARRY OFFICE
721 N. University
(right down from Hill Auditorium)
DRY CLEANERS AND LAUNDERERS

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Major League Standings

li

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 92 57 .617 -
Baltimore 86 64 .573 61?
Chicago 86 64 .573 6
Cleveland 74 75 .497 18
Washington 73 77 .487 1914
Detroit 68 82 .455 241
Boston 64 85 .430 28
Kansas City 55 94 .369 37
LAST NIGHT'S SCORE
New York 4, Washington 2 (10 ins.)
Chicago 6, Detroit 3
Kanlsas City 6, Cleveland 1
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Boston
Detroit at Chicago (N)
New York at Washington (N)
Cleveland at Kansas City (N)

NATIONAL

Pittsburgh
Milwaukee
St. Louis
x-Los Angeles
:-San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia
x--Incomplete

LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
92 58 .613 -
U6 63 .577 52,
85 63 .574 6
78 69 .531 1214
75 73 .507 16
67 83 .447 25
57 92 .383 34a
55 94 .369 36

LAST NIGHT'S SCORE
Los Angeles 2, San Francisco 0 (end
of five innings)
Only game scheduled
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Chicago at San Francisco (N)
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (N)
Milwaukee at Philadelphia (N)
St. Louis at Los Angeles (N)

Come in and see the
POPULAR
SPECIAL
BICYCLE
(a Raleigh Industries Product)
.$4j95
with HANDBRAKES and
STURMEY-ARCHER 3-SPEED GEARS
We Still Have
Some Saddle Baskets in Stock
BEAVER'S BIKE & HARDWARE

u

nmedicalI

FORKS

expense

could

cost

you

a

K

college

education

Register for Men's Rush'
First Floor Michigan Union
September 26-October 4
Weekdays
2-5 P.M. -

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605 Church

NO 5-6607

IM.

U

0

0

0

HIGHLIGHTS OF
YOUR STUDENT
HEALTH PLAN:
W Coverage in force 24
hours a day -on or
off campus (including
vacation periods).
0 Eligible dependents can
be included.
* Covered expenses inc-
include Hospital room,
board and miscellane-
ous expenses, doctors',
surgeons' and nurses
fees.,

A BAD FALL - AN ACCIDENT - an emergency operation - a bottle
excess of the income or savings alloted to your education. It doesn't
with fever - each could result in hospital and medical expenses for in
take long these days to spend hundreds of hard earned dollars for neces-
sary medical treatment!
* YOUR STUDENT HEALTH PLAN, written according to specifications of
the Student Government Council. has been designed specifically to help
defray these high hospital and medical expenses. This liberal Plan sup-
plements the existing Health Service Benefits furnished you by the
University. The Student Health Plan combined with the Health Service
6 benefits provides more complete protection against the high costs of hospi-
tal and medical care.
* DESCRIPTIVE BROCHURES and applications have been mailed. Addi-
tional copies are conveniently located throughout the campus. Be SURE
that unforseen medical Expenses don't cost you a college education -
return your completed application and premium TODAY! Be prompt, the
enrollment period is limited.

UNIVERSITY INTER-ARTS MAGAZINE
Announces its first organization meeting
writers * poets. artists "photographers * musicians

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