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September 25, 1960 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-25

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IBER 25, 1960 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Western Reaction Sees
Russian Leader's Talk
Heightening Tensions

MONETARY FUND HEAD:
Economist Sees Nation
, Living 'Without Inflation'

WASHINGTON ()-Per Jacobs-
son, chief of the International
Monetary Fund, said yesterday the
current slowdown in the American
economy means the nation is;
"learning to live without infla-
tion."
Jacobsson told a news confer-
ence the spotty business picture
bears little resemblance to the
usual dip in the business cycle.
Rather, he attributed the econo,
omy's hesitancy to what he said
is a realization by Americans that
they can expect relatively stable
prices in the future - that no
longer will everything go "up and
up and up."'
Meets Newsmen
The noted Swedish economist,
who is the monetary fund's man-
aging director, met with newsmen
in advance of the annual meetings
of his organization and the World
Bank. The sessions will be held
here from Monday through Fri-
day.
Jacobsson said two major situa-
tions will occupy the finance

ministers at the meetings:
dramatic upsurge in West

The
Ger-

many's monetary reserved-which
he says should prompt the Ger-
mans to help underdevedoped
areas - and the outflow of gold
and dollars from the United States.
However, his questioners focused
on the United States business si-
tuation which has been puzzling
the experts.
Declines Forcast
Jacobsson declined to forecast
a recession. He indicated he ex-
pects the economy to remain at
high levels so loong as Europe is
prosperous and provides good out-
lets for American exports. He said
he sees no sign that the European
boom is wearing out.
At the same time, Jacobsson
said he "can't see any reason for
a sharp upward spurt" while the
United States still is in the pro-
cess of, as he believes, adjusting
to a non-inflationary environ-
ment.

___ _... I

4 DAL O 6264

TODAY
THRU
F R I DAY

Communists
Claim Speech1
As Triumph
By The Associated Presse
LONDON--The tone of Soviet'
Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev's
Friday speech to the United Na-
tions General Assembly means'
that the Cold War is colder than
ever.
This is the gloomy assumption
of the newspapers of Western Eu-
rope and other parts of the non-
Communist world.
Soviet bloc press hailed the
Russian premier's address as a
diplomatic triumph.
Accuse Premier
The non-Communist press ac-
cused Khrushchev of trying to
scuttle the UN and create new
international tensions.
These newspapers at the same
time praised President Dwight D.
Eisenhower's Thursday address to
the UN assembly as a sincere
effort to ease tensions, but saw
little chance his words would
change the situation.
Several British newspapers pre-
dicted Khrushchev will run into
a counter-blast from West. The
London Evening Standard said
that the United States, Britain
and France "believe they may soon
be able to deal him a staggering
blow" in the struggle for support
of the uncommitted nations at the
UN.
Call Ike Winner
Many European papers thought
Eisenhower came out on top if his
speech and the one by Khrush-
chev are judged strictly as efforts
to win friends.
The Frankfurt Abendpost said
the score stands "1-0 for Ike,"
adding that "Khrushchev had
nothing to offer, no new course,
no genuine new program."
Khrushchev's talk dominated
Swedish front pages, with the
papers taking particular note of
the Premier's attacks on UN Sec-
retary - General Dag Hammar-
skjold, who is a Swede.
Austrian newspapers noted
Khrushchev's aggressive tone. The
Kurier said "Khrushchev's new
phase of the cold war is aimed at
the United Nations as the next
victim."
In Latin America, O Estado de
Sao Paulo, Brazil's bigegst news-
paper, said in an editorial the
present organization of the United
Nations must not be changed "just
because Senor Khrushchev wants
it changed."
Most South African newspapers
expressed shock at the Soviet lead-
er's attack on Hammarskjold and
the general structure of the United
Nations.
tions.
By contrast, the Soviet Com-
munist party newspaper Pravda
declared "the world listened, ap-
plauded and approved" Khrush-
chev's talk.

U.S. VISIT:
UN Idea Is
Defended
By Nehru
NEW DEL HI (M-)-Prime Minis-
ter Jawaharlal Nehru flew to New
York last night stoutly defending
United Nations ideals and func-
tioning, crossing swords with Pre-
mier Nikita S. Khrushchev's pro-
posals for revamping and moving
the world organization.
Talking to newsmen before
boarding his plane, Nehru said
any crisis of which men speak is
not in the United Nations but in
human affairs and hjman minds
and "the United Nations has never
been stronger than it is today."
Nehru said the only way to
strengthen the United Nations is
to "improve the world atmos-
phere."
"If there is a basic realization
that nations have to pull together,
the United Nations becomes
stronger because it then reflects
the state of the world."
He rejected Khrushchev's pro-
posal for abolition of the UN
Secretary-General's post in favor
of a three-man commission and
said, "I don't quite understand
how a committee or commission
is going to work."
Regarding Khrushchev's sug-
gestion to shift UN headquarters,
Nehru said: "I do not think it is
easy but apart from that, the
mistake was committed earlier by
shifting it from San Francisco
and locating it in New York."
Nehru apparently referred to a
conference in San Francisco in
1945 at which representatives of
50 nations prepared and signed
the UN charter.
He said that, "broadly speak-
ing," he supports UN action in the
Congo. He added, however, that
he has not quite understood "a
large number" of UN actions in
the Congo and therefore could not
endorse them at present.
PAPER-BOUND
BOOKS
50 Publishers Represented
PROMPT SERVICE
On Special Orders
OVERBECK'S
BOOKSTORE

LAGOS, Nigeria (OP)-- Nigeria,
the African country with the most
people, begins tomorrow a three-
week celebration of complete in-
dependence from British colonial
rule.
Independence Day is Oct. 1 and
looming 'large over the plans for
celebrating is the resolve of Ni-
geria's leaders that their country's
birth will not be accompaniednby
the strife that has marked inde-
pendence in the Congo.
Standing firmly behind that po-
sition are Sir Abubakar Tafawa
Balewa, the quiet, dignified fed-
eral primier, and Nnamdi Azikwe,
the dynamic, popular man who in
November becomes the first Ni-
gerian governor-general.
Favors Conference
The Premier sums it up this
way: "Our new national spirit,
which we hope will help us toward
responsible leadership in Africa
as we take our place as the biggest
independent country in the conti-
nent, is what we depend on most
to fulfill our destiny."
He told a news conference today
he favors calling a conference of
African leaders at the highest
level. Such a meeting, he said,
could make a worthwhile contri-
bution toward solving many prob-
lems ,now facing the continent,
particularly the "unfortunate sit-
uation in the Congo."
He also told reporters he does
not consider the idea of a federa-
tion of African states feasible at
this time.
'Like a Dream'
"To talk of a political union of
African states is to me something
like a dream," he said, "although
I do not rule it out as a possi-
bility in the future."
A country of about 36 million
people on the Gulf of Guinea
just where the western hump of
Africa bends to the south, Nigeria

has had long years of preparation
for freedom by British advisers.
With this and with thousands of
college-trained citizens, Nigeria
faces independence with a confi-
dencethe Congo never experi-
enced.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL-The gusty
winds of storm Florence forced
postponement yesterday of a
United States attempt to hurl
the first satellite into orbit around
the moon.
A determined effort was made to
fire the huge Atlas-Able moon
rocket into the teeth of the storm
but, with the count 75 minutes
from zero, the crewmen decided to
wait for better weather.
HOT SPRINGS, Ark. -Gover-
nors of key Southern states
pointed yesterday to the religious
issue as a possible determining
factor in any Dixie defections
from the Kennedy-Johnson Dem-
ocratic ticket.
Gathering for their annual con-
ference at this historic health
resort, early arrivals among the
southern executives talked politics
avidly as they prepared for for-
mal sessions beginning Monday.
* * *
LEOPOLDVILLE, The Congo--
Col. Joseph Mobutu had an hour-
long meeting yesterday with ex-
premier Patrice Lumumba 'to try
for a reconciliation in a bitter
struggle for power among the
Congo's leaders.

OPENS TOMORROW:
Nigeria Plans Independence Celebration

U

I

Mass Rushing Meeting,
Union Ballroom
September 28
7:30 P.M.

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