100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 22, 1960 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1960-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHTG:%N DAILY

TvM-nA a

THE MICHIGAN DAILY 1U WwW1'W~ ~. -- = w*. ~
.1 Z1Ufl~L

UAY, E

DAILY
OFFICIL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
S-Meal jobs.
1-Counter-clerk (10 a.m.-12 noon
Monday-Saturday).
1-Linotype operator (experienced).
2-Observers (10 a.m.12 noon Monday-
Friday).
5-Busboys (11:45-1 :30)
FEMALE
15-Guides-upperciass biological sci-
ence majors $3.00 per hr.
2-Full-time salespeople.
2-Room j obs.
2-Carhops.
2-Waitresses (11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Mon-
day-Saturday).
2- witchboard operators (11 p.m.-12:30
a.m.).
Organization
Notices
USE of this column for announce-
ments is available to' officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active
for the fall semester should register
by OCTOBER 10, 1960. Forms avail-
able, 3011 Student Activities Building.
Folklore Society, Folksing & Member-
ship Meeting, Sept. 22, 8 p.m., Union,
3rd F1. Conf. Rm.
Riding Club, Organizational Meeting,
Sept. 22, 5:10 p.m., WAB. Call Lee
Sonne, NO 2-3122 for information.
Sailing Club, Open Meeting for New
Members, Sept. 22, 7:30 p.m., Union
Ballrm.
Baha'i Stud. Group, Meeting, Sept. 22,
8 p.m., League, Hussey Rm. Speaker:
Mrs. M. Wolter, "Introductory Presen-
tation of the Baha'i Faith." All inter-
ested are welcome.
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily

REPLACING CALLA HAN:
Winston Appointed New SGC Secretary

Julia Winston, a 1960 graduate
of the University, is replacingk
Mrs. Ruth Callahan as Adminis-
trative Secretary to the Student
Government Council.
The appointment was made
upon the joint recommendation
of Mrs. Callahan, Dean of Men
Walter B. Rea. and Vice-President
for Student Affairs James B. Lew-
is.
Miss Winston graduated from
the business administration school
where she served as secretary to
the business administration stu-
dent council. She also was secre-
tary of Phi Chi Theta professional
sorority,.
Worked in Advertising
She has worked recently as an
advertising research analyst for
an advertising company in De-
troit.
Mrs. Callahan, whom she re-
places will work as Administrative
Assistant to the Office of Student
Affairs working with women's
loans and most SGC student ac-
tivities.

if any, equals in the country. It
is a responsible organization com-
posed of responsible people."
Flexible Instrument
She added that "the Council is
a flexible instrument which can
be modified according to the stu-
dents' wishes," and warned that
"if it were lost, it would take
much effort to re-establish any-
thing comparable to it."
"The Council needs the con-
structive criticism of the students
and their support to fulfill its
potential," she pointed out,
"As long as the students en-
courage Capable people to run for
election to the Council, I have no
fear for its future," she concluded.
The new Secretary is a native
of Saginaw. She attended the
University of Kentucky for two
years, transferring to the Uni-
versity as a junior.
At Kentucky she was Treasurer
and President of Alpha Delta Pi
sorority, a member of the House
Presidents' Council.

JULIE WINSTON - A 1960 graduate of the University will
replace Mrs. Ruth Callhan as Secretary of SGC. I

' ;

3RUBEC$ SWINGS-Dave Brubeck will present his style of "stream of consciousness jazz" in
fill Aud. tomorrow night. The Quartet, featuring Paul Desmond, will add "cool West Coast
cotes".
frubeckXTo Bring 'Coast Jazz'

Student loans and SGC were
here former responsibilities.
She has worked with the Coun-
cil since it was begun in 1955 and
with the committee on student af-
fairs which preceded it.

She says that "the student body
should recognize that in this stu-
dent government they have some-
thing quite unique. In SGC, they
have a potential channel for stu-
dent participation which has few,

by Judy Sattler
Jazz, In what has been called
Lie "stream - of - consciousness"
Lyle, will be heard in Ann Arbor
:morrow as the Dave Brubeck
uartet plays its concert,
As the most popular exponent
f the "cool" West Coast school
f jazz, Brubeck brings to his
music much more complex har-
ionic and rhythmic elements
han the earlier jazz artists.
He introduces classical piano
w o To Speak
9n Mecjtanics
The University's Institute of
>cence and 'Technology will spon-
or two lectures by distinguished
oreign scientists on phaseshof
iechanics today and tomorrow.
Prof. H. Neuber of the applied
iechanics department of the
echnische Hochschule in Munich
ill speak at 4 p.m. today in Rm.
11 West Engineering on the
rheory of Shear Distribution in
rismatic Bodies with Applica-
ons to Notch Problems."
"General Laws of Elasticity" will
e the subject for Prof. Udo
Vegner's talk at 4 p.m. tomorrow,
iso to be in Rm. 311 West En-
ineering. Prof. Wegner is director
f the Institute for Technical
[echanics in Darmstamdt, Ger-
aany.

procedures and techniques into his
work, and most writers agree that
Brubeck's music shows the in-
fluences of classical music as
much as it does the influences of
the earlier jazz periods.
Whimsical
"Time" magazine once noted
that his music is filled with
"whimsical variations hinting at
everything from Stravinsky to.
Gershwin to Bach," with "Bach-
like counterpoint and his big poly-
tonal chords."
The typical Brubeck session
consists of the simple statement
of the tune, usually of a popular
song, followed. by a development
which works further and further
from the original tune.
In this development, the quartet
toucheson many motifs, and
moves into manyr keys, becoming
more and more dissonant; then,
after this long treatment In which
each member of the quartet is
improvising, the familiar notes of
the original theme being to re-
appear.
Building this type of music,
Brubeck works closely with the
quartet, but especially with his
alto saxophonist, Paul Desmond.
Desmond and Brubeck are said:
to have "tremendous rapport,"
and can work closely together in!
these intricate improvisations.
Studied Jazz
Although Brubeck intended to
study veterinary medicine at col-
lege, he soon switched to music.
It was at college that he first,
began working as a professional

musician, as well as carrying on
a "continual jam session" in a
basement apartment with two
roommates.
After World War II service,
Brubeck organized his band, and
in the early fifties became part
of the progressive West Coast
school.
Although this type of music has
been accused of lacking the
warmth and immediacy of earlier
Jazz, Brubeck himself has a dif-
ferent view of modern jazz.
He says, "today's jazz reflects
the American scene, the hopes,
dreams, and the frustrations of
our generation."

CAPABLE and ENTHUSIASTIC
SERVICES ARE NEEDEDI
PETITIrON NOW
for committee chairmanship:

..

r- -

ES

L.

MEMBERSHIP
PUBLICATIONS
SUPPER CLUB

INTERFAITH
SERVICE
UJA.

* CHOOSE FROM A LARGE SELECTION
* STUDENT BUDGET PLAN

0 30-DAY FREE INSPECTION

Classified Ads

Petitions due by Thurs., Sept. 29
2lnterviews held on Sun., Oct. 2
Hillel offices: 1429 Hill Street
THE B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION

I

STUDENT SUPPLIES
TYPEWRITERS
ALL MAKES
FOUNTAIN PENS
STATIONERY.
NOTEBOOKS
OFFICE FURNITURE
Typewriter Repair Work a Specialty
Fountain Pens Repairedf

ROYCE UNION
Ann Arbor's Best Bicycle Buy!
Light Weight
3-speeds 95
Extra Large Chainguard4 1
E dustab Stand
A FULL WRITTEN GUARANTEE!

SENIORS

Make your Senior Picture
appointments TODAY
Diag 9-4.
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BUILDING
8-5

The Home of

Since
1908

SMORRILL'S
314 South. State Street

Phone
3-2481

Royce Union - Schwinn - Raleigh - Robin Hood
campus BIKE &-TOY
514 E. William St.- near Maynard- NO 2-0035

I

I.-

Li

C

"
IC

In

pe

Se

R

co0

I.

ost

oua

0

ego,

uc'

ion

i

A BAD FALL - AN ACCIDENT - an emergency operation - a battle with, fever - each could result in
hospital and medical expenses far in excess of the income or savings alloted to your education. It doesn't
take long these days to spend hundreds of hard earned dollars for necessary medical treatment!
YOUR STUDENT HEALTH PLAN, written according to specifications of the Student Government Council,
has been designed specifically to help defray these high hospital and medical expenses. This liberal Plan sup-

I

plements the existing Health Service Benefits furnished you by the University.

The Student Health Plan

I

combined with the Health Service benefits provides more complete protection against the high costs of hospital

and medical care.

I_

* DESCRIPTIVE BROCHURES and applications have been mailed. Additional copies are conveniently located

HIGHLIGHTS OF YOUR
STUDENT HEALTH PLAN:
* Coverage in force 24 hours a day-on or
off campus (including vacation periods).

throughout the campus. Be SURE that unforseen medical

Expenses don't cost you a college education

.return your completed application and premium TODAY! Be prompt, the enrollment period is limited.

Additional Information through

I

III

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan