100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 03, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Seventy-Fifth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORTy OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

An Attack on the Ohio State Protests..

here Opinions Are Free, 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MicH.
Truth Will Prevail

NEWs PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
THURSDAY, JUNE 3, 1965 NIGHT EDITOR: BRUCE WASSERSTEIN

'U' Should Give Students
An Opportunity To Plan

(

ACADEMIC ANNOUNCEMENTS must be
updated so they become realistic rep-
resentations of actual roles and condi-
tions.
NoW-they are not. Nearly everyone has
his own examples: course descriptions
bear little relationship to courses ,and
departmental rules are easily-and often
necessarily-broken.
One classic case involves an incoming
freshman, who read "College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts" and made the
mistake of assuming that, since it said
"arts," it included arts. She was last seen
vainly trying to transfer to art school.
MORE COMMON-if less novel-cases
involve'questionable prerequisites and
distribution requirements. Does every
course prerequisite make educational
sense? Is Political Science 100 really a
procedural or intellectual necessity for
majoring in political science?
"I hope none of you are in this class
to learn what the announcement said
you'd learn, because you're not going to,"
one Math 412 teacher told a class; his
course eventually became rigorous, ex-
citing, challenging-but not what the an-
nouncement said it was.
These and hundreds of other over-
sights may seem small; in fact, if you
have an extraordinary counselor or ex-
perienced friends, you can avoid most of
them. But everyone runs into at least one
eventually; and that collision is usually
painful, frustrating and academically
devastating.
STUDENTS MUST KNOW what excep-
tions exist. They must know what is
really offered in a course.
The latter need is met to some extent
by the unofficial course description book-
let published by seven student groups.
But the official course descriptions should
be more correct.
Yet' unknown exceptions and misun-
derstood procedures cause the most pain-
ful mistakes for students. And it wouldn't
be hard to remedy the stuaton. Coun-
selors have two booklets, totaling about
140 pages, detailing the labyrinth of rules
and counter-rules. These should either be
included in the school announcements
or placed in reference areas of the li-
braries.
EITHER OF THESE alternatives would
make work easier for the counselors.
Students -;would know what questions
they wanted to ask and what procedures
they needed before they went into the
counselor's office. And this would help
JUDITH WARREN ... ........Co-Editor
ROBERT HIPPLER .......... o-Editor
'EDWARD HERSTETN ...... Sports Editor
JUDITH FIELDS.. . Business Manager
JEFFREY LEEDS ...Supplement Manager
NIGHT EDITORS: Michael Badamo, John Meredith
Robert Moore, Barbara Seyfried, Bruce Wasserstein.
The Daily is 'a memrr of the Associated Press and
collegiate Press Service.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
udse of-anews dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited to the newspaper. All rghtsnf re-publicaton
of all other matters here are also reserved.
Subscription rates $4 for IlA and B ($4,50 by mail);
$2 for fIA or B ($2 50by mai.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich
Published daily Tuesday throug Sturday morning.

students since they could plan their aca-
demic futures with more precision, en-
thusiasm and confidence.
Ideally, the rules would be broadened
so that exceptions would be included in
them; but for the moment,,a clear, ac-
curate and accessible representation of
the rules would unquestionably be an im-
provement.
-ROBERT MOORE
What Happened
To Humphrey?
THE PICKET SIGN at East Lansing told
the story: "What has happened to the
people's Humphrey?"
The ex-college prof, the campus liber-
als' friend, was at MSU to defend the
Johnson policy in Viet Nam against the
campus liberals.
Considering that he started from a
faulty premise, he did a right good job,
too. He compared Viet Nam to Korea, and
called Korea "the most principled mili-
tary action we ever took."
THE COMPARISON is inviting, but it is
hardly relevant. Humphrey, a consum-
mate politician, was arguing with a non-
existent opponent when he said that the
U.S. rejects the "belief that by some Heg-
elian law of inevitability China is destined
to swallow up all of Asia." So far we had
heard no one advance that argument.
Criticism of the administration is
based, rather, on the belief that Viet
Nam is not in the United States' prime
area of concern, and that we cannot go
on indefinitely keeping the peace there.
WHAT THE MORE responsible "campus
liberals," among others, argue is that
the United States has no future in South-
east Asia except as a friend of the peo-
ple.
We would agree with the President that
the United States has no choice now but
to go ahead and fight until we can nego-
tiate,.
It became evident during last month's
lull in the bombings that the North Viet-
namese were not interested in negotia-
tions now.
BUT WE TAKE strong issue with the
President's beliefs on three specific
points: that the Viet Cong can be left
out of the negotiations, that a peace trea-
ty will insure peace and independence
for Couth Viet Nam, or that the United
States could negotiate itself into being
an acceptable keeper of the peace.
The Viet Cong must be dealt with be-
cause they are doing the fighting. A peace
treaty by itself will no more insure peace
than the Geneva pact of 1954 insured
peace.
It will take the combined efforts of all
anti-Chinese Asian nations, including In-
dia, Russia, Viet Nam and Viet Nam's
neighbors, to stop the spread of Chinese
domination.
JUST AS THE WAR itself is home-grown,
so the peace will have to be home-
grown.
-DETROIT FREE PRESS

EDITOR'S NOTE: In a May 22
editorial, the Columbus Dispatch
attacked the student protests over
the banning of Marxist speaker Her-
bert Aptheker from the Ohio State
University campus as marching "to
the cadence of Communism's
drum." A few days later, the Ohio
State student newspaper, the Lan-
tern, reprinted the Dispatch edi-
torial along with an editorial of
its own rebutting the Dispatch's
arguments. The two editorials are
presentee} Here.
By THE DISPATCH
THE MONTH OF MAY, once
the happiest period of the col-
lege year, has been degraded by
the fradulent intellectuality of the
times.
So grim is the temper of events
a return to the madcap frolics of
panty raids, or other steam-vent-
ing student activity, would be
welcomed as a return to comfort-
able normality.
THE RIOTS of trouble thrust
deeply into the social structure,
wedging divisions more disruptive
than any simple disruption of
comfort and convenience.
The controversy astir at Ohio
State, in which an arrogant mi-
nority seeks to impose its will on
the less volatile majority of the
student body and evenupon the
university administration, suggests
strongly a subversion directed
from the outside.
Time was when faculty mem-
bers made profitable use of free
time advancing their own learn-
ing.
THE OLD dedication to re-
search, to writing and to further
enrichment of their scholarship
has been put aside by a limited
but shameful number of the fac-
ulty.
Thehcause of unrest for its own
sake has been fostered by these
defaulting and influential teach-
ers, and the students, like auto-
matons, parade mechanically* to
the cadence of communism's
drum.
This new breed of college in-

structor brings indoctrination into
the classroom instead of instruc-
tion.
NO ONE ever has complained
of teaching which details the es-
sence of Marxism. Enlightened
people should know about the
Communist political process.
But this is not the goal of the
new agitation. Rather than teach
about Marxism the dissident few
of the faculty, impelled by their
own secret motivations, immobilize
their students' minds in a web of
doctrine.
WHETHER Herbert Aptheker
carried his Marxist mission to the
Ohio State campus is the lesser
part of the debate.
What is more pertinent is
whether Ohio State University, an
institution of the government
maintained by public money, must
continue to defend its regulations
and purposes from the onslaught
of a handful of the puppets of
subversion in the faculty and stu-
dent body.

P

*1

Student Protests-Subversion or Healthy Concern?

...A Rebuttal by the

By THE LANTERN
REPRINTED elsewhere on this
page is an editorial published
last Sunday in the Columbus Dis-
patch.
The Dispatch's misleading anal-
ysis of the current campus con-
troversy over the Speakers' Rule
was read by thousands of Central
Ohioans whose attitudes toward
OSU may be mishaped by it.
We would like to set the record
straight. Weeks of careful report-
ing of the controversy have shown
it to be anything but Communist-
inspired "fraudulent intellectual-
ity" involving a _"dissident few"

faculty and students
from the outside."
INSTEAD we have no
more than 500 facultyr
hardly a dissident few, ha
petitions calling for the
or drastic revision of th
ers' Rule.
Nearly 100 more, all ten
holding the rank of assis
sociate or full professor,
the May meeting of the1
Trustees.
To our knowledge these
not Communists and cert
fraudulent intellectuals.
know that many of tl

"directed among the academic star
tical science, economics,
history, psychology, educa
oted that other departments.
members,
ve signed Many are known in
abolition educational circles as top
e Speak- and brilliant teachers.
SIMILARLY, students
lured and in the free speech mover
stant, as- include many top scho
picketed student leaders-scores
Board of dents of the Stadium Sct
Dormitory, dozens of hov
men are grams participants, ten1
ainly not present Student Senater
We do Phi Beta Kappas and a
;hem are Wilson fellow.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:

an tern
s of poli- Their demands for a Speakers'
English, Rule change have been supported
ation and by the Conference Committee of
the Teaching Staff, the Graduate
Council, the Student Senate,
national Alumni Distinguished Teaching
scholars Award winners, the vast majority
of voters in two Student Senate
'l referendum elections and several
involved pastFaculty Council votes.
nent also
lars and MORE IMPORTANT to us, but
of resi- evidently distressing to the Dis-
holarship patch editorial writer, is the fact
nors pro- that the Speakers' Rule has spark-
past and' ed vigorous campus debate of the
members, p grposes and responsibilities of a
Woodrow good university and how well Ohio
State fulfills them.
ThedDispatch believes this "fo-
mentgd unrest" has "degraded"
the month of May on campus. It
yearns for a return to the "com-
fortable normality" of panty raids
"or other steam-venting activity."
Frankly we believe that among
the most normal and desirable ac-
tivities for intellectually awake
university students and faculty
members are discussions and de-
oment of bates of university problems and
ot think- other important issues.
y of stu-
are not PROTEST, FREEDOM of dis-
ors, but cussion and a general striving to
fessors; it improve personal and community
ople who conditions are American demo-
s univer- cratic ideals.
Belief in them once made in-.
dependence from England both
to David, necessary apd possible.
etter and Students and faculty members
ain cam- who have led the fight against
and will the Speakers' Rule and for an im-
proved academic atmosphere at
he nega- Ohio State have acted not only
sually the within the historical framework of
American democracy, but also in
thebest spirit of its most cherish-

40

Is the 'Pop-Left' Taking Over:

To the Editor:
LAST WEEK'S editorial calling
for the resignation of J. Edgar
Hoover on the grounds that he's
still fighting Communism de-
serves comment if for no other
reason than it so well illustrates
the vapid, semi-conscious intellect
and ideology of Ann Arbor's grow-
ing pop-Left.
The group of individuals to
whom this editorial appeals, while
in no sense intellectuals or ac-
tivists, eagerly grasp every op-
portunity to echo the cliches
which fill this editorials
CLEARLY, Hoover is well over-
due for retirement; his statement
about Martin Luther King is suf-
ficient proof of this.
However, this should not permit
either intellectuals, the academic
community or the nation as a
whole to ignore the fact that a
great portion of the world's popu-
lation is controlled by totalitarian,
repressive governments, a number
of which are Communist, and that
these governments are, by their
very existence, a threat to the in-
dividual and national liberty of
millions of persons who may very
well not want liberation through
the kind offices of Peking or the
Kremlin.
IF WE ALL get together, sing a
few folk songs and tell ourselves
that totalitarian governments
don't really exist-maybe it will
come true.
But until the time that this
occurs, I suggest that a more ap-
propriate function for those who
hope to earn the title of political
intellectuals is to provide mean-
ingful dissent such as the Teach-
In which, at least, was conducted
by experts and was innovative,
informative and occasionally pro-
vocative.
-James McEvoy, Grad

To the Editor:
I AM A doctoral student at the
University and have spent time
teaching and studying at other
colleges and universities in the
country, including the University
of California at Berkeley.
Like many others I have been
watching these campus protests,
riots, teach-ins and what-have-
you.
And it has never failed to dis-
gust me that these people, who
truly are the favored and privileg-
ed, who have so terribly much to
be grateful for, both to their uni-
versity and their country, should
act insuch a manner.
Today I received a letter from

my 17-year-old brother, a mem-
ber of the United States Army,
which pretty well expresses the
thoughts of one "outsider" and
which I should like to pass on.
"I'VE ALWAYS thought of the
University of Michigan as a stable
but liberal school. However, from
the reports I've heard I think you
should disown the school and the
diplomas and honors it conferred
on you.
I am a liberal but the action of
these people makes me somewhat
ashamed that you are a part of
such a university.. If.I ever hear
of you going to meetings like this
I'll disown you as a sister .. !"

I AM SURE at the m
writing this, David was n
ing of the great majorit
dents and faculty who
negativists and protest
rather positivists and prof
is the latter type of pe
truly represent what thi
sity 'stands for,
So while I write this t
we might reflect on his l
consider the impact cert
pus actions have had,
have, on outsiders.
It is unfortunate that t
tivist-protest faction is us
most vociferous.
-Virginia M. Morzent

MATTER OF FACT:
Asian War i s- Rough Business'

By JOSEPH ALSOP
HONG KONG-The first reports
of hard fighting in the north-
ern provinces of South Viet Nam
were coming in as this reporter
packed to leave Saigon for home.
It now appears, from the way
the battles are developing that
the Communists' rainy-season of-
fensive is being mounted substan-
tially earlier and, on a larger
scale than had been foreseen.
Before much more time has
passed, therefore, events are like-
ly to answer the stern question:
"Who has been overconfident?"
PRESIDENT JOHNSON and his
planners have clearly been very
confident indeed since the Presi-
dent took his crucial decision to
bomb North Vietnamese targets
after the incident at Pleiku.

American troops have been sent
to South Viet Nam and more are
on the way; but no serious effort
was made to bring the newly ar-
rived troops into contact with the
enemy prior to the beginning of
the Communist offensive.
There has been talk of ever-
widening "oil spots" of protected
countryside around the U.S. mili-
tary enclaves at Da Nang and else-
where. But this is nonsense.
EVEN THE Da Nang "oil spot"
is a mere pinpoint in the uncon-
trolled immensity of the surround-
ing province. And the jungle-
covered mountains that rise from
the plain only a few miles from
the Marine base are unchallenged
Viet Cong territory.
There has been talk, too, about
the "punishment" inflicted on the
Communist North by the bombing
attacks.
But both the areas and the
targets attacked have been so
carefully limited that the northern
bombing campaign, so far, has
rather resembled an attempt to
inflict a serious wound by biting
a man in the toe.
AGAINST the American confi-
dence revealed by these signs, one
must balance the ringing, an-
nounced confidence of the other
side. In an interview with K. S.
Karol, for instance, the Chinese
Communist vice premier; Marshal
Chen Yi, recently declared roundly
that "the Vietnamese people are
perfectly capable, with their own
forces, of driving the American
aggressors from their territory."
Since there are good reasons to
believe that the enemy's confi-
dence is real, it is worth having a
look at its probable sources.
The firepower of an enemy
"main force" battalion more often

estimation of the enemy "main
force" units is always hard.
For except when attacking or
moving up to attack, "main force"
units are normally based in moun-
tain and jungle redoubts that have
generally been beyond reach of
the South Vietnamese army.
FROM THE PATTERN of the
fighting in the northern provinces,
it appears that Gen. Thi's esti-!
mate of the enemy "main force"
units facing him was closer to
reality than the estimates of the
Americans who heard him with
some skepticism.
Furthermore-and this is per-
haps the key point-there is no
longer any doubt that the "main

force" units in the South are being
continually reinforced from North
Viet Nam.
Gaps in the ranks of units that
are still officially Viet Cong bat-
talions have long been filled with
infiltrated northern regular
troops.
IN ADDITION, whole forma-
tions of the North Vietnamese
army have been invading the
South in recent months.
The entire 325th Division is
present, and more may well have
crossed the border or be on the
way.
In short, what is now beginning
can be a very rough business.
(c) 1965, The Washington Post Co.

p

5

FEUFFER

AW iO
WH bAT5
MEW5~)
FROH
OMcRAS

57
5.
I,

FrcaTIMO Ca1O;' hUTO&)t6Hr
IN' NEW 3YORKSHARGEUM. IHC
OQVWkN)ME3TOF THE LWI.JTG7
STATS HAS FIL.Ut A STMG
PROTC'T WIP TE COVERP-
MEMT OF GHANJA C AIHIW)
THAT IT ACiTi2 lt CAiLY Wk
O!SFATCHIM3 TLWOVOSAMP
MAP 1065 -TO PROT~Cr 1HE
HOT61, THC657A A NDPOTHECR
STP'ATE&C PO&)T§ /10THE
COHM00)TYr

iIl

HAS AONOLC
TO DROPk
5AK)D PAR
I N)EO THE
TO Pf~oTE
OF WOS
Jt$TA
THEY C
FPPOF1
TlAIJ

410TIH*-E -r E
EUT OF ISRAC(,
)UCE9P Palls
ONE~ THOU-_
AT;COP5
Eopou6 Hs OF
ti AIJP &BRNkX
CT HO%$E
;HIP.
\s s5XoJ A;
CET BACK~
VI&T Fh1
WPJ1 APAAJ

A Good Societ Includes
Some Social Hypocrisy
THE STATE has no business legislating virtue, indeed, one of the
symptoms of totalitarianism is the persistent attempt of the state
not just to punish its citizens for wrongdoing, but to change their
nature, to make them what its rulers conceive to be good.
But patently the state has the' obligation to protect the young
against the public acts of the vicious.
This means that, in the matter of the sale and display of
pornography, the state, the apparatus of the law, should have two
effective policies. It should strictly forbid making pornography acces-
sible to the young: "No One under 18 Admitted."
BUT AS FOR pornography for adults, the law should rest content
with a simple hypocrisy: "Keep it out of the marketplace, sell it
under the counter, and the law won't bother you."
An assumption underlying such policies is that a certain amount
of official hypocrisy is one of the operative principles of a good
society. It is hard to imagine a civilized society which would not
disapprove of adultery, for the maintenance of the family as an
institution is one of the prime concerns of society, and adultery

--

i FVRTHFRP!EUEOPMHJTS
Ff9&)CH PAPATIQOO9$ HAVE'
RI11 CC CPATJO 3 dF

Pke5V6U!T X O &-
SOt\ CODS U65
To ItiStST -NAT
D) Of< (S AB

( a-s

r

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan