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May 27, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-27

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THURSDAY, MAY 27, 1965

THE iNlt HIr A m nA TT.v

,..RSDA ,MAY 27,_1965. - .ra J.Y i. i UA s 3 ri U ZPlC ALJ..

PAGE THE

TO BE REPLACED:
Troops Leave Republic
SANTO DOMINGO (P) - Six ter-American Force (IAF). The
hundred United States Marines-IAF was authorized by the Orga-
the first to land in the embattled nization of American States.
Dominican Republic - were the The departed Marines were re-
first to leave yesterday. They rep- placed by 600 Brazilian, Hondur-
resent the first trimming of U.S. an, Nicaraguan and Costa Rican
military strength in proportion to troops, the first IAF Latin Amer-
the arrival of Latin American ican contingents to arrive here.X
here. The departure of the Marines.
Units of the 3rd Battalion, 6th followed a night of renewed clash-
Marine Regiment boarded helicop- es between U.S. troops and rebels
ters at a polo field which the Ma- stationed in downtown Santo Do-
rines had set up in the interna- mingo.
tional zone amid the Dominican 22 Incidents
civil war. A U.S. spokesman said there
The White House announced were 22 incidents, the sharpest of
Wednesday that American forces which came as a rebel force tried
have evacuated 6,514 persons, in- to infiltrate the U.S.-controlled
eluding 2,282 American citizens3 supply corridor that cuts through
and 2,475 persons claiming the the capital.
Dominican Republic as their coun- The rebels were turned back
try of origin. after an exchange of fire.{

Denounces
Soviet Bases
In Viet Nam
WASHINGTON (R)P - Secretary
of State Dean Rusk, disclosing a
further Soviet missile involvement
in, Viet Nam, said yesterday it
would be a great mistake if Mos-
cow and Peking should think "that
a larger war on their side would
remove us from Southeast Asia."
At his first news conference in
two months, Rusk said there may
be a second surface-to-air missile
site in the immediate area of Ha-
noi.
"We understand that in one of
these sites, there is amissile-as-
sociated equipment," Rusk said
under questioning.
Officials said that the term mis-
sile-associated equipment refers to
such things as launch platforms,
gantries, derricks, launching pads
and similar apparatus needed to
put a missile into firing position.
limi- So far as presently known, there
are no Soviet missiles in place and
night ready for firing, officials said.
Col.
who U.S. Ambassador Maxwell D.

U.S., Red Chinese Confrontation Nearing

By CLARENCE FANTO
Special To The Daily
NEW YORK - Indications are
mounting that a major confron-
tation between the United States
and Red Chinese or Russian forces
may be in the offing in Viet Nam.
Although there have been no
official reports or statements from
Washington to bear out this con-
tention, sources in Moscow re-
port that the Soviet Union and
Communist China may be patch-
ing up their ideological and poli-
tical differences because of U.S.
policy in Southeast Asia.
Cyrus S. Eaton, an 81-year-old
Cleveland businessman who has
met frequently with Communist
leaders in the past, has warned
that there is "increasing anger
and bitterness" in Communist
countries about the U.S. bomb-
ings of North Viet Nam. Eaton has
just returned from a two-week
visit to three Communist coun-
tries. He also met Soviet Premier
Alexei Kosygin in a 90-minute in-
terview last week.
Quotes Kosygin
Eaton, who favors U.S. disen-
gagement from Viet Nam and an

Viet Nam, the attacks "have left 300,000 "volunteers" may be pre- West at this time. Yet, its futu
us no alternative but to fight," paring to enter the conflict. leadership of the Commun
Eaton quoted the Soviet leader. Observers note that North Viet world, its prestige compared w
Although Eaton has not yet Nam and Communist China are China's, and fulfillment of
presented his report to officials both committed to a Viet Cong promise to defend North Viet Ni
in Washington, it has been reli- victory in South Viet Nam. For depend upon a strong response
ably reported that the Pentagon Communist China, a defeat would U.S. raids over that nation.
is planning a call-up of Army Re- not only constitute a severe psy- Construction of Soviet an
serves should a sudden increase chological blow but would indicate missile installations on the pe
in the number of U.S. forces in -failure of China's policy of support imeter of Hanoi is reportedly pi
Viet Nam become necessary. of "wars of national liberation." ceeding at a rapid rate. Ma

i

Provide Bulk
The U.S. will continue to pro-
vide the bulk of the men and ma-
terial for the newly created In-
DIAL 662-6264
3 COMPLETE SHOWS
DAILY AT 1:00-4:30 & 8:00

Another departure Wednesday
involved President Lyndon B.
Johnson's special assistant for na-
tional affairs, McGeorge Bundy,
who returned to Washington to
give the President a first-hand
Report on the impasse over ar-
ranging a coalition government in
Santo Domingo.
In Washington, Secretary of
State Dean Rusk told a news con-
ference the Communist threat in
the Dominican Republic has been
"substantially reduced." However,
'Across
Campus
FRIDAY, MAY 28'
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present "Shoulder Arms,"
starring Charlie Chaplin, in the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The University Players,
Department of Speech Production,
will present Carl Oglesby's "The
Hero" in Trueblood Aud.

McGEORGE BUNDY
he said it was not entirely e
nated.
Bundy had met Tuesdayr
with the rebel president,
Francisco Caamano Deno,

told a Wednesday news conference
that his talks with Bundy were
"very helpful" and had "substan-
tially improved chances for a so-
lution."
In the past, Caamano has said
he would step down in favor of a
coalition government. However, his
rival president, Brig. Gen. An-
tonio Imbert Barrera, who heads
the opposing civil-military junta,
has said he will not step aside
and that the rebels should sur-
render.,

Taylor and Premier Phan Huy overall policy of accommodation
Quat initialed a foor for peace with Communism, quoted Kosygin
agreement under which the U.S. as telling him the Soviet Union
will send South Viet Nam $6.8 mil- would pool its armed forces with
lion worth of food-25,000 tons of China to strike at U.S. forces in
rice and 7000 tons of milk to ease Viet Nam unless the U.S. alters its.
shortages caused in part by Viet policies there, particularly its
Cong activity and 1964 floods in bombing of North Viet Nam.
the northern provinces. "The burden of Kosygin's re-
Meanwhile, U.S. bombers con- marks was that the United States
centrated much of their attention had declared war on the Soviet
yesterday on a single section of Union," Eaton said.
North Viet Nam's seaward spine, Since the Soviet Union has
the Vinh area. guaranteed the defense of North

Production Increase
Hanson W. Baldwin, military
editor of the New York Times, re-
ported recently that an increase
in production of weapons and
modern jet bombers is also in the
planning stages.
In another development, he re-
ported that the Navy is prepared
to resort to the draft for the first
time next month if its manpower
shortage is not alleviated by vol-
unteers. Up to this time, the Ar-
my has been the only branch of
the military service to make use
of the draft. A draft call of 17,-
000 men has been issued for June,
the highest since the days of the
Cuban missile crisis in 1962.
Prof. Hans Morengthau of the
University of Chicafo, an out-
spoken participant of the recent
Washington "teach-in" on Viet
Nam, has also warned of possible
Soviet intervention. Writing in the
New Republic recently, he pointed
out that future Soviet leadership
of the Communist bloc nations
depends on a strong response to
the U.S. attacks on North Viet
Nam. To Moscow, restored unity
in the Communist world is even
more important than the policy
of "peaceful coexistence" with the
West, Morgenthau said.
Tangible Signs
Meanwhile, there are tangible
signs that Communist hinese
forces may be preparing t" inter-
vene in Viet Nam. All civilian
travel on the main railway line
connecting Peking with southern
China has been prohibited for
three weeks to allow the move-
ment of troops and supplies.
Western observers in Hong Kong
have suggested that Peking has
already massed troops and equip-
ment near the North Vietnamese
border and was ready- to send
them across on short notice, Reu-
ters news agency reports.
A joint military command, con-
sisting of Communist China, North
Viet Nam, the Viet Cong, and the
Pathet Lao (the Communist forces
in Laos) has also been created,
leading to speculation that at least

I4
}

Severe Setback
Such a defeat would constitute
a severe setback in China's ideol-,
ogical and political quarrel with
Russia as well as in her efforts
to gain support from Communist
satellites and parties in Asia and
Africa.
For North Viet Nam, a defeat,
after prolonged bombing attacks
by the United States, might well
result in a governmental reshuffle
in which younger, pro-Peking men
would gain power at the expense
of Ho Chi Minh, who takes a
neutral position in the Sino-Soviet
dispute.
North Viet Nam has also mount-
ed a major propaganda effort for.
home consumption, assuring its
people of eventual victory and re-!
unification with the South.
The Soviet Union is caught in
a difficult position. Its internal
economic needs would seem to,
preclude a major conflict with the

Soviet technicians and advisera
will help man the installations.
No Acknowledgement
While the United States ha
not acknowledged the imminent
;hreat of Russian and/or Chinese
intervention on the side of the
Viet Cong, it is planning a majoi
increase in U.S. forces stationed
in South Viet Nam.
Military sources in Saigon re-
port that 20,000 additional U.S.
troops are due to arrive at a
coastal base soon, boosting the to-
tal number of American forces in
the nation to well over 60,000,
Further troop increases will be
effected as necessary during the
expected heavy fighting next
month as the monsoons envelop
South Viet Nam with heavy rain
and fog.
The weather will greatly ham-
per U.S. air operations, and it is
thus eptected that the Viet Cong
will atemPt to gain major mili-
;ary s~itories during the period.

DAILY OFFICIA L BUL LE TIN -
., ::k Jv."}r".v : L .t.t' . . ::..t.; : .g r...:..:R ..:r .... ... JS v^.^t:

U-M PLAYERS-Dept. of Speech
OPENS TOMORROW
THE' HERO
by Carl Oglesby
8 P.M.-TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
Fri.-Sat. All Seats: $1.00
Box Office Open 12:30-5 (Until 8 p.m. performance nights)
OPETNMEETING
8:00 P.M. THURSDAY, iAUD A
REPORT ON NATIONAL TEACH-IN,
and PLANNING FOR FURTHER ACTION

,.U

'"" h

I

PETER ELKE
SELLERS SOMMER

ENDING TONIGHT
?Q: SHIRLEY MacLAINE
PETER USTINOV
RICHARD CRENNA{
AS Jx otpOF RR
CMB0 UE UNMASOPE
FR I DAY-
BURT LANCASTER
IN THE SUSPENSE
STORY
"THE TRAIN"
DIAL 8-6416
SHOWS AT 7 & 9 P.M.
"Bergman, with his
first color film, proves
as masterful as with
Hback and white. A
mischievously amus-
ing free-style frolic.
playfully throwing
darts at critics, fame,
censors and female

2ND FEATURE
Meet the zaniest
characters ever gathered
under one bed!
7\
DAVID NIVEN
IPETER SELLERS
ROBERT rAGNER
CAPUCINEi.
THE PINK PANTHER .
CLADIACRDNL
AsThe Prncess
UCNICOLOR

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
siti of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in -TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; flay
Calendar items appear oince only.
Student organtration notices are not
acc~pted for publication.
THURSDAY, MAY 27
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar-Paul Pi-
gors, professor of industrial relations,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
"The Management of Employe Disci-
pline": Michigan Union, 8 a.m.
General Notices
Regents' Meeting: June 18. Commu-
nications for consideration at this
meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than June 4.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Pontiac Osteopathic Hospital, Pontiac,
Mich.-Bacteriologist, man or woman,
degree and/or extensive exper. in Bac-
teriol. Start July 1.
City of Oakland, Calif.-Jr. Engineer,
BSCE. No exper. req. Handle des., con-
struction, inspection & maintenance of
city facilities.
Merck & Co.; Rahway, N.J.-Opening
in toxicology area of Research Lab.
Trng., exper. & strong interest in ex-
perimental embryoiogy. Located West
Point, Pa.
State of Utah, Salt Lake City-Job
Trng. & Placement Specialist in vocat.
rehab. & services to visually handicap-
ped. Degree in Bus. Mgmt., Personnel,
Indus. Rel. plus 2 yrs. exper. Grad
study may substitute for exper.
Local Organization-1. Personnel &
Labor Relations Trainee, BA exper. not
req. 2. Chemists, BS or MS esp. poly-
ner. 3. Tech. Aides, 2 yrs. college chem.,
degree not req.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
S* s
Christian Science Organization, Reg-
ular testimony meeting, Thurs., May 27,
7:30 p.m., Room 3545, SAB.
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with
instruction, Fri., May 28, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
RENTALS
of
TELEVISIONS
TAPE RECORDERS
HI-Fl's
All Types Lowest Rates
Ain Arbor Radio & TV
1319 So. Univ. NO 8-7942

Addison-Wesley Publishers, Birming.
ham, Mich.--Field Reprer. for Tech.
Book Div. BA, pref. 1-2 yrs. sales exper.
Age 26-28. Sell books to tech. insti-
tutes. Territory covers S.E. Mich. & N.W.
Ohio.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Ann Arbor Co-op.-Man, age 20-21;
water safety instructor's certificate to
work recreation area Sat. & Sun.
Wood Conversion Co., St. Paul, Minn.
-Grad student in physics or elect.
engrg. Assist mgr. of acoustical lab.
Sherwood Forest Camp, Minn.-Girls.
Counselors in sailing, canoeing, & trip-
ping, and riflery. Mi. age 19. June 19-
Aug. 19.

Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Application for these' jobs
can be made in the Part-Time Em-
-ployment Office, 2200 SAB, during the
following hours: Monday through Fri-
day, 8 a.m. until 12 noon and 1:30
until 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or full-time tem-
porAry work, should contact Robert
Parker, part-time interviewer, at 764-
7283.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin
board in Room 2200, daily.
--Excellent opportunity for someone
able to work 20 hours per week on
a permanent basis. Qualifications
for position include: knowledge of
bookkeeping, typing skill and an
interest in working with figures.
Main duty will be the responsibility
of handling departmental account-
ing and bookkeeping procedures.

By
The Faculty-Student Committee
in Vietman

U

Details available at
ment, 212 BAB.

Summer Place-

if

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Full Time & Evening Employment
18-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week end
occasionally on Saturday, you con maintain your studies and still enjoy
a part-time job doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $67.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. Monday-Friday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment.

to End the War

admirers."

-Cmi

ingmar
-egman's
fistFil 1m in Color
amLL
DISTRIBUTD a.JANUS FILMS
--COMING SUNDAY-
"LOVE THE ITALIAN WAY"

I

I

I

I

I

g tsytwits.ss=ess= ..s.w==swsw=== wswsswwwwww. i.ss=w.wa..
* I
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
SHOULDER ARMS
also on the same
program a varied series
of short films including'
Walt Disney's LEMMINGS
& ARCTIC BIRDS (color)
BASHFUL BALLERINA with
Imogene Coca

A8

two briliant ways to take

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Ij,; ;

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