100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAIL

wv.nvp.qnAV- TWAV K. 14199

Y LL;1t.'QTAY7 UMAX 5,19

3

RESTON ADDRESSES GRADUATES:
Urges Dedication of Life to Peace

MONTHLY MEETING:
Regents Make Appointments

By ROBERT HIPPLER
Co-Editor
Speaking at the University's
commencement, New York Times
Associate Editor James Reston last
Saturday urged the graduating
classes to abandon a life domi-
nated by materialism for one
dedicated to increasing the chanc-
es for peace in the world. "Your
help is needed in public service,
in teaching, in making our cities
and our country slums a more
hopeful place,"' he said.
Reston said that "the problem
of many generations before yours
has been that the average man
felt helpless before the great ques-
tions of the day. This is not true
today."
He emphasized that there is
now a vast army of Americans
working to better the world, con-
sisting not only of diplomats and.
journalists and doctors out in the
world, but also of those who teach
and those "retraining the aband-

oned generation in Appalachia or
bringing clean water to the vil-
lages of Africa and Latin Amer-
ica."
Critical Point
Reston was critical of commer-
cial and material, emphasis in
American life, asserting thats"the
broad commercial superhighways
... bypass everything, including,
I sometimes think, life itself."
"The happiest men and women
I know are not those who are
providing the material things that
clutter up our lives and dull our
minds, or even those who escape
from the struggle, but those who
are engaged in the tasks that
nourish and elevate the human
spirit."
Reston promised the graduating
classes that they would face a
more complicated and often more
frustrating world than that en-
countered by their ancestors--but.
one which would offer them an
unprecedented vista of choice.

"It will be a highly interde- so many useful things to be done
pendent world. . . we will have to and so many opportunities for
learn a lot more than we now young people to do them," Reston
know about the languages and the said.
natures of men and women inW
other parts of the world," he said. World Challenge' w
He added that. the nation will
Reston predicted that the rest face complicated and challenging
of the century would bring "stren- situations in the years ahead. The
uous intellectual competition for a challenge of worldwide revolution
person and even more for his " and Communism "confronts every-
children; therefore if one wants to w .f

A CAMPUS FASHION
WHICH GIRLS WILL LOVE

keep up rather than giving up,
education will have to be a life-
time process."
Life in coming years will con-
tain considerable frustrations, he
said. For one thing, personal pri-
vacy will be at a premium. "It
will be an increasingly crowded
world ... the need for privacy wil
have to be sought and protected,
even more" in the future genera-
tion.
Government Role
High taxation and the cost of
government, in addition, will
mean that "a life devoted primar-
ily to the acquisition of material
things is likely to make even less
sense in the last quarter of this
century than it did before."
Despite the problems the grad-
uates will face, "I have not come
here to be depressing or pity-
ing," Reston said. He noted that
the previous two American gen-
erations had graduated in yearsj
when the last two world wars were
just getting underway-1915 and
1940. In addition, this "may be the
first American generation in a
hundred years with no personal
memory of either a great war or
a great depression."
This generation of graduates
confronts a world that presents
problems, but "seldom, if ever, has
there been a time when there were,

ne wa a , care Ju pro iem
of analysis if we are to reach
sound judgments."
In this context, Reston focused
criticism on recent teach-ins. He
explained that he had been "bom-
barded" with protests from stu-
dents for commentingthat the
teach-ins seemed to him more
like demonstrations than debates.
He explained that the teach-
ins, while serving as excellent for-
ums for interested persons, in- his
opinion limited their usefulness by
eliminating grounds for discussion
of complicated problems.
OLD WAYS DON'T W OR

A memorial service will be held
for Prof. Paul M. Fitts of the
psychology department who died
of a heart attack Sunday. The
service will be held at 2 p.m. at
the Unitarian Church today.
Fitts was serving as a consultant
to the President's Science Ad-
visory Committee and as presi-
dent of the Human Factors
Society at the time of his death.
K:I,

FITTS DIES

iFormulate

New Method

A:
din
litt
pro
J. O
bein
T;
tim
go
tion

The Circle Pin
From 2.95-6.95, gold filled and sterling.
(Engraved at no extra cost)
at

The Week]ACaps
A Capu I

BAY

S arcade

jewelry shop

16 Nickels Arcade-off State St.

THURSDAY, MAY 6
8 p.m.-Crest will sponsor a
travel lecture in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra under the direction of
Eugene Ormandy and featuring
soprano Leontyne Price will per-
form in Hill Aud. This is one of
the May Festival Concerts.
FRIDAY, MAY 7
8:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia
Orchestra, under the direction of
Thor Johnson, and the University

Irish her the best
Give her the finest...
for Mother's Day
SUNDAY, MAY 9th
Please your Mother on this special Sunday with
the lovely Russell Stover GiftBox. Appropriately adorned
with pink carnations, it contains Assorted Chocolates
and Butter Bons-the finest, freshest candies sold.
112 lb. box $2.40 2'% lb. box $3.50
Assorted Chocolates at $1.60 a pound
CHESTER ROBERTS
1203 South University 312 South State
"the sweetest spot in town"

Ch
per
be
Ma
Mu
Bru.
qua
2
Orc
Wil
Hill
Ros
8
Orc
dire
feat
Hill
2
Ore
Tho
ion'
reen
Dic
Aud

I

TRAVEL INC.
AIRLINE
STEAMSHIP
HOTEL
CALL
665-3734
IN THE MAYNARD HOUSE

To Enforce Litter-Law
knn Arbor's anti-littering or- warrant issued by the Municiple
ance will be tougher when a Court in order to enforce the or-
ering violation ticket is ap- dinance.
ved by Municiple Judge Francis Under Ann Arbor's littering or-
Y'Brien. The ticket form is now dinance an offender can receive a
ng prepared. maximum penalty of 90 days in
he ticket will eliminate the jail and a fine of up to $100.
e consuming activity officers The law on litter not only ap-
through to obtain authoriza- plies to public property, but to
i from the city attorney for a private dwellings as well. The
law reads that "the duty of every
owner of property to maintain his
premises in a clean condition"
[0 Com e and not to permit garbage, rub-
bish or other wastes to accumu-
late so as to create a hazard to
According to the city's clean up
chairman dozens of apartment
oral Union Youth Chorus will owners in Ann Arbor are guilty of
form in Hill Aud. Featured will violating the law by failing to pro-
Janice Harsanyi, soprano, vide adequate garbage contain-
ureen Forrester, contralto, ers. Tenants who create the
rray Dickie, tenor, Anshel messes are also indicted for fail-
silow, violin, Joseph De Pas- ing to obey the anti-littering or-
le, viola. dinance.
SATURDAY, MAY 8 Police have also received sev-
:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia eral calls recently about rubbish
hestra under the direction of trucks which scatter their con-
liam Smith will perform in tents on roads and sidewalks as
IAud. Featured will be Leonard they are driven to a dump. This
e, violincellist. action also is a violation of the
:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia litter law and drivers can be
hestra will perform under the prosecuted.
ection of Eugene Ormandy and Another reason the police are
Luring Cesare Siepi, bass, in having difficulty enforcing the
Aud" law is that handbill peddlers
SUNDAY, MAY 9 sometimes violate the law.
:30 p.m. - The Philadelphia The ordinance says handbills
hestra under the direction of must be handed to an occupant or
r Johnson and the Choral Un- owner of a house and cannot be
Youth Chorus featuring Mau- stuck in doorways or dropped on
i Forrester, contralto, Murray porches.
kie, tenor will perform in Hill
. .
Evacuate Band
BE SHE'LL DIE LAUGHING! To Pu t R
ToPuerto nico
RNA LISI SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico - The
University jazz band arrived in
U San Juan yesterday and after
being evacuated from the Domin-
ER ican Republic yesterday.
The band was aboard one of the
IFE United States warships that are
.TED ARTISTS evacuating some 1000 American,
British, Canadian and Jamaican
N DIAL nationals from the republic. }
5-629u Dean James Wallace of the mu-
sic :school said that an embassy
official told him the band stayed
in their hotel rooms when rioting
broke out in Santo Domingo.
Wallace said there was some in-
as/ dication band members might1
have had to leave their instru-
ments behind :in the Dominican
Republic. He said that it was
hoped a charterflight could be
arranged to take the band to Ja-
maica,. the next scheduled stop on
its 100-day Latin American con-
cert tour.
The band returns from its tour
on Sunday.

Two new department chairmen
were appointed by the Regents at
their regular monthly meeting
Friday.
Prof. William B. Willcox was
named chairman of the history
department and Prof. H. R. Crane
was named chairman of the
physics department.
The appointments are effective
July 1 and continue for five years.
Wilcox replaces Prof. John Bow-
ditch, chairman for the past five
years, who had asked to be re-
lieved of his administrative duties
so as to have more time for
scholarly pursuits.
Previous Experience
After receiving a PhD at 'Yale
University in 1936, Wilcox taught
at Williams College until coming
to the University. He has served
as acting chairman of the de-
partment twice.
Wilcox's work in teaching and
research was recognized in 1945
when he was the recipient of the
Henry Russel Award. He also serv-
ed as a Fulbright lecturer at Ox-
ford University from 1957 to 1958,
was a visiting associate professor
at the University of Chicago in
1949, and was a member of the
Institute of Advanced Study in
1946 and 1947.
Crane replaces Prof. David Den-
nison, who has been chairman of
the physics department for the
past ten years. Dennison asked
that he be relieved of the re-
sponsibility so that he may give
more attention to scholarly and
writing duties,,
After receiving his degree at
California Institute of Technology
in 1934, Crane joined the physics
department as an instructor. He
rose to the rank of professor in
1946 after various assignments at
the Radiation Laboratory of MIT
and at Carnegie Institute of
Washington during the war years:
Widely Recognized
He is widely recognized for his
work on a variety of physical
problems and known for his pio-
neering work in the development
of electron accelerators and their
use for measuring particle mo-
bilities.
The Regents also renamed two
departmental chairmen. Prof. Wil-
liam M. Sattler was reappointed
to the speech department and
Prof. Clarence K. Pott was re-
appointed to the Germanic lan-
guages and literatures department.
Appointments
The Regents also made the fol-
lowing appointments at their
meeting.
Robert W. Adams as professor
of international business, effec-
tive July 1. He is manager of the
general economics department of
Standard Oil Co.
Engineering
William J. Anderson as assis-
tant professorf of aeronautical
and astronautical engineering, ef-
fective this September. He is at
the Wright-Patterson Air Force
Base, Ohio.
Elmer G. Berry as professor of
zoology and curator of mollusks in
the Musem of Zoology, effective
June 1. He is a scientist director
in the National Institutes of
Health, Bethesda, Md.
Donald E. Cleveland as associate
professor of civil engineering, ef-
fective with the 1965-66 University
year. He is on the facaulty of
Texas A. & M.
Paula Eldot as assistant pro-
fessor of history, Dearborn Cam-
pus, effective fall term. She is at
the City College of New York.
Spanish
Charles F. Fraker as assistant
professor of Spanish, effective fall
term. He is on the faculty at
Wesleyan University.
John J. Hanlon as adjunct pro-
fessor of public health adminis-
tration, effective April 1. He is
Detroit commissioner of health
and he will serve the University
part-time.
Elton D. Higgs as assistant pro-

fessor of English, Dearborn Camp

pus, effective fall term. He is to
receive his PhD degree from the
University of Pittsburgh this,
year.
John W. Kingdon as assistant
professor of political science, ef-
fective this September. He is com-
pleting PhD requirements at the
University of Wisconsin.
Law
Robert N. Leavell as visiting
professor of law, effective in
August. He is now professor of lawI

at the University of Georgia.
Marlyn E. Lugar as visiting
professor of law, effective in
August. He is professor of law at
West Virginia University.
Robert I. Magnusson as visiting
associate professor of electrical
engineering, effective in August.
He is a professor of applied elec-
tronics at the Chalmers University
of Technology, Goteborg, Sweden.
Robert A. Martin as assistant
See REGENTS, Page 3

*1
9

ALL NAME BRAND YARNS
Sg Making
SNeedlepointQ
t Knitting Supplies
YARNCRAFT SHOP
11 Nickels Arcade Call 662-0303
r ""0 0""> ="0"""0<--0--o= > m s >

I

BAUSCH & LOMB
SUN GLASSS

r

...

BRING THE LITTLE WOMAN... MAY
JACKLEMMON
ill
MURDl
YOUR WI
TECHNICOLORPReuthm UN
MICHIGA

The U.S. Navy picked Ray-Ban Sun Glasses as standard
equipment for the recent "Deep Freeze" expeditions to tle
Anatarctic. The ereason? Unequalled glare protection.
Now you can give your eyes this same fine glare protection.
In a choice of the season's most fashionable frames anrd
colors. Ray-Ban Sun Glasses are available in 19 frame styles,
46 colors, for men and women-lens types for every
outdoor activity, priced from $9.95 to $24.95. Come in-
try on a pair of Ray-Bar Sun Glasses today.
" the Quarry inc.
320 SOUTH STATE STREET, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
"e" dI Uy sA
[Read and1 Use Daily Classified Adts

*

It

figur6

r

o

Back to class?
Go with class!
:. o
GO HONDA!
just the ticket for campus traffic, crowded
parking lots or just plain fun. And, instead of
walking her to class, you can ride her to class!
-Hondas are more fun than a barrel of coeds.
See all the Honda models (there's one just

I

11

I

Dial 662-6264

STARTS TODAY
Shows at 1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00 & 9:05

G-1V
tV ~
r1'

REMEMBER
your one and only
MOTHER
on
Mother's Day, Sunday, May 9
with a
. . . HALLMARK CARD
... Box of BARTON'S CANDY
Lovelv gift from

4I

MEL a
0 0QC C
r bOO
p apQ

I

11

ii

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan