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August 24, 1965 - Image 41

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

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TUESDAY, AUGUST 24, 1965
Diverse Opportunities

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE
L U

comprises the Medical Center
complex, north of the women's
dormitories on the hill.
Students desiring to enter the
school must show 90 hours of
undergraduate work in the sci-
ence-oriented pre-medical pro-
gram.
Nationally known for its ex-
cellence, the school has an ex-
cellent hospital and faculty.
The dean is William Hubbard.
Music
The Music School is unified in
a new North Campus building. It
contains over 700 music majors
and 80 faculty members, and is
the second largest music school in
:he country.
It offers a standard four-year
undergraduate program as well'as
a graduate program leading to
bachelor and master of music de-
grees.
Its, faculty members have won
several national and internation-
al prizes, and frequently give free.
concerts. The University Glee Club
won the Welsh International Eis-
tenddford at Llangellen, Wales.
The school's summer program
at Interlochen is well known, and
the dean is James B. Wallace.
Natural Resources
The ,University has the nation's
first school of natural resources,
established in 1950.
Offering degree programs in
wildlife management, fisheries,
conservation, forstry and wood
technology, the school is situated
in the Natural Resources Bldg. on
East University, north of the en-
gineering buildings.
Many of the top officials in gov-
ernment and private forestry and
conservation bureaus are Univer-
sity graduates.
Nursing
The basic program of the Nurs-
ing School consists of a four-year
program combining general and
professional education and lead-
ing to a bachelor of science de-
gree in nursing.

Student Nurse Prepares To Hand over Scapel

The one year old'medical surgi-
cal program which leads to a mas-
ter of science degree is expected
to attract more students this year.
This unit is sluated in the Medi-
cal Center complex, and the dean
is Rhoda Russell.
Pharmacy
The Pharmacy College was es-
tablished' in 1876.~ It Provides a
five-year program for a bachelor
of science degree in pharmacy, a
six-year professional program for
a doctor of pharmacy, and two
graduate programs.
The curricula include special
studies for hospital and profes-
sional pharmaceutical work andj
also for industrial technology.
The $1.2 million Pharmacy
Bldg. dedicated in 1961 provides
modern facilities and planning for
research activities. The dean is
Tom D. Rowe.
Public Health
In order to prepare professional
workers, to offer sin-service train-
ing to existing public health
workers and to conduct research,,
this school was established in
1951.

As a graduate school, it offers
programs leading to masters de-
grees in public health and indus-
trial health and doctor of pub-
lic health.
Research projects by the school's
faculty members include a $144,-
000 five-year study of virus drugs
and another study of factors asso-
ciated with nutrition.
While situated in the Public
Health Bldg. new space is be-
ing provided by the adaptation of
the former residence hail, Victor
Vaughn. Myron F. Wegman is the
dean.
Social Work
The school of social work is
found among the various language
centers and the classrooms are in
the Frieze Bldg.
It is a graduate school with a
two-year program leading to a
masters degree. Most of the unit's
work is done with funds received
from the federal government. One
of these projects, supported by a
$22,000 grant from the Dept. of
Health, Edudcation and Welfare,
involves a. study of possible cures
and educational programs for
juvenile delinquents. The dean is
F. F. Fauri.

SI
.
.!
.i:

JBSCRIBE NOW
764-0558

WELCOME
Class of '69

WELCOME your visitors at the beautiful new

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Honors Program-'U' Elite

rI

Wy ROBERT KLIVANS
After eight years of operation,
the Honors Program, the Univer-
sity's attempt ;to challenge its
gifted students, can be judged a
success, according to Prof. Adon
Gordus, associate director of the
Honors Council.
Gordus said that 95 to 98 per
cent of honors students continue
their education in graduate school
or join the Peace Corps. This, he
said, reflects the system's em-
phasis on academic. excellence.
The Honors Program is the
"largest and most comprehensive
in the country" according to Gor-
dus. It already offers close to 220
courses to the honors student.
"I don't know of another program
that has more than 50," Gordus
pointed out.
Admission Criteria
About 12 per cent of the in-
coming freshmen are invited to
enter the Honors program. Ad-
mission is generally based on a
1350 coxpposite score on the Schol-
astic Aptitude Tests and a high
gradepoint.
Students may also enter the
program later in their academic
careers if they achieve a high
average.
The Unified Science Program is
an extension serving mostly the
literary college and some engin-
eering students. Composed of two
years of mathematics, physics and
chemistry, it attempts to estab-
lish a strong foundation for sci-
entific knowledge. In addition, a
tutorial cdurse offers the students
an opportunity to serve as a re-
search assistant in a faculty mem-
ber's project.

Blagdon Houses in Mary Markley
Hall.
Housing
Because of the student response
to honors housing, Hunt House
and Frederick House in South
Quadrangle will become Honors
units this fall.
The initiative take by the Hon-
ors Council can be seen in the
new campus literary magazine
Offset which was inspired and
managed by Honors students.
According to Gordus, thn Hon-
ors Council is always striving to
find new innovation which will
improve its programs. He pointed
to the summer reading program
in which a student may get Uni-
versity credit for reading books
away from the campus as an ex-
ample of this force.

PLUS 4 AT.THE-INN
RESTAURANTO COFFEESHOPO! "LIBRARY" COCKTAIL LOUNGE
LOCATION: North side of Jackson Avenue, just west of 1-94
(Detroit Expressway) on the west side of Ann Arbor.
.... . ............... ............................;......,. ..,.y:.:.V:V:.4.J:.V::4.. i:t.:... . .::: ..::^:V.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .J:I,.y'..,..A
v ,, ;V. r...........WV.
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....V.V. .t.V. ... . ..... ........4....................:.::J: .: . '...t.V.... ":.4. :f..'.*.'....%..tfL 4 .Vl . .'. "' J:.tr:". Jr.:T :{ ::a...:
:v.?.:". ...4 pr. . ....: . ."" : .Js ....l.."....^.....::::v:v W::JL::..1..r f:":.iRr:""r'a:".?:'". atL , «....i ""::I...a. fJa ..
.. .;..4.".. LSC {",:::.""":r".d :S"hWir":,r':":":. ::... .......^.. ...^...". :14:::r :. ..:

If

THE NATION'S
INNKEEPERI

-REG. U. S PAi {ff...

1 - --

ADON CORDUS

Also extending in the field of
music( the Honors Program spon-
sors special seminars, recitals and
directed research.
Designed to supply tne student
with a maximum depth exposure
to a variety of courses during his
first two years, the Program of-
fers a field of concentration in
which the student is confronted
by detailed research assignments
and personal contact with famed
faculty.
Outside the purely academic
sphere, the Honors Council unu-
der the direction of PrMf. Otto
Graf has been trying to estabhsh
a residential community of schol-.
ars. Honors Housing, initiated sev-
eral years ago occupies Frost and

The

Center

of Campus Activity..

THE
The L

ICHI GA

including-
Grill, Barber Shop,

U

NOTICE TO FRESHMEN:.
One counseling service the University of Michigan
does not provide is helping you choose the place
where your clothes will be properly Dry-cleaned and
laundered. To help you avoid the mettlesomeness by
trial-and-error, we cordially invite you to stop in
and become acqua.inted with us-the right place for
you-for service as you like it-WHEN YOU like it!
,EVERYTHING you bring in is thoroughly cleaned and
expertly pressed; cuffs are brushed and tacked, missing
buttons replaced, rips mended-All these extras are
included in our regular, moderate prices.

er
U

Ynion

of fers a multitude

of facilities

'
#.
1

"r-,

Dinin;g .Room,

Cafeteria,

Michigan Union

Bowling Alley, Swimming Pool, Billiard Room, Listening Rooms,
Student Offices, Meeting Rooms, Pendleton Library.

The "MUG"--for a meal or a coffee date . .

For relaxation--a game of pool

i

p : . >_ :_ i ______,"'_e'_..______.________# li

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