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May 12, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-05-12

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 1965
If Wessin Decides

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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5

To Quit, Junta

Head Ready To Accet Resignation
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican
Republic (/)-While debate raged
in the United Nations over the
United State's Dominican policies
yesterday, the head of the Do-
1 minican Republic's military-
civilian junta left it up to Brig.
Gen. Elias Wessin Y Wessin
whether he should resign to meet
the rebel demands.
Brig. Gen. Antonio Imbert Bar-
reras, president of the junta, said<
he knew nothing of a report from
the U.S. embassy that Wessin had
resigned as commander of the
training base at San Isidro, 203
miles east of Santo Domingo.a
Col. Francisco Caamano Deno,
provisional president of the rebels,
has been demanding' Wessin re-
sign and leave the country, hold-
ing him mainly responsible for
air attacks that took more than
1,000 lives early in the revolt
that began April 24.
Reported To Have Resigned ' .
Wessin was repoitted to have ... '. :_
resigned under U.S. pressure Mon- -Associated Press
day night, but then changed his A REBEL TANK STANDS IN the rebel held sector of Santo Domingo as tension continued to grip
mi .G' the Dominican Republic. The head of the civilian-military junta agreed to accept the resignation of
"The question of Gen. Wessin's Gen. Elias Wessin if he offered it. The rebels consider the first step toward a peaceful solution of the
resignation is a matter between
Gen. Imbert and Gen. Wessin," crisis.
the U.C. embassy said in a state- was going to resign at 4 p.m. approval would complicate the ef- Velazquez' resolution would in-
ment. Monday. We now understand that forts of the Organization of vite Thant to follow closely events
"We did understand from of- he, is reconsidering his decision." American States to restore peace in the Dominican Republic "and
ficial sources that Gen. Wessin m ha ....i....i.......r:ii" 7 --- ----- , M, ..*. ~r---n.-11n-.---.

Students Get
Monentary
Assistance
WASHINGTON (P)-Forty-one
colleges and universities each
awarded $1 million or more in fi-
nancial aid to their students dur-
ing the 1963-64 academic year.
Another 74 institutions each
handed out from $500,000 to $999,-
999 in scholarships, loans and
jobs,
These figures, from a report
issued last night by the Educa-
tional Testing Service, show that
helping their students get through
college has become a multi-million
dollar business for the nation's
institutions of higher learning.
The testing service said the
1,221 colleges and universities par-
ticipating in the survey awarded
more than $251 million in student
aid.
But the report admittedly re-
veals only part of the true situa-
tion.
It does not include awards made
by national scholarship programs
such as the National Merit Schol-
arship Programs, state scholar-
ship and loan programs, work-
study grants, or even loans and
jobs which students get after ar-
riving on campus.
The $251 million reported by
the Education Testing Service
went to 454,000 students. The
average student award was $553.
About $120 million was in scholar-
ships, $85 million in loans, and
$45 million in jobs.
Although private colleges which
were not church affiliated gave
the most scholarships, they were
also the most expensive schools
to attend according to the report.
The report also noted that the
Eastern "Ivy" schools gave the
largest . scholarships, but also
pointed out that these schools had
the largest endowments.

BURMESE PROBLEM:
Want Tribes Closer to Center

s

By PETER BOOG
Associated Press Staff Writer
RANGOON-A mailed-fist and
velvet-glove campaign is under-
way to bring Burma's indepen-
dent-minded minority tribes closer
to the central government.
At stake, says one government
minister, is "Burma's very exist-
ence."
The five minority states that
help make up the Union of Burma
-and which play a key role in the
defense of Burmese borders-are
the Chin, Kachin, Kayah, Shan
and Karen regions.
The Chin Hills border India, and
the Kachins share a 1,200-rile
frontier with Communist China.
The Kayahs face Laos, while the
Shans and Karens are along the
boundary with Thailand.
The states have a turbulent
World News
.Roundup
By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-The Soviet govern-
ment yesterday expelled an Ameri-
can diplomat on charges of whip-
ping up racial discontent among
African students with gifts of food
and liquor.
"I deny the charges," said the
diplomat, Norris D. Garnett. The
United States embassy backed him
up.
Garnett, 33, a Negro cultural
attache, was expected to leave
within a week.
Izvestia, the government news-
paper, accused Garnett of bribing
African students "to make slan-
derous statements" against the
Soviet Union.
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson said yesterday
that his job development program
has created a potential of more
than 25,000 new jobs since it be-
gan in February.
* * *
LONDON - Foreign Secretary
Michael Stewart claimed yester-
day Indonesia recently has de-
ployed substantial army reinforce-
ments in Indonesian Borneo and
Northern Sumatra.
Addressing the North Atlantic
Council of ministers the British
statesman asserted, however, what
he called "the blatant aggression"
of President Sukarno's regime
against Malaysia would fall.
Stewart called upon NATO
members to ban the shipment of
all arms and other forms of aid
to Indonesia.

history since Burma achieved its
independence 18 years ago. Their'
jungles and uplands have been
the scene of bitter fighting be-
tween government troops and rebel
tribesmen seeking more autonomy
from Rangoon.
Failure to bring these states
into line and the resulting threat
of secession was one major reason
for the overthrow of civilian Prime
Minister U Nu by Gen. Ne Win in
1962.
Since then, Ne Win and his
military-socialist government have
focused attention on the states.
Intensive Drive
For over a year, an intensive
army drive has been in progress
to try to crush the rebels.
The rebels still pose a formid-
able force of more than 15,000,
despite defections and surrenders
under military pressure.
But lack of political cohesion
among the tribal groups and a
growing shortage of arms and
ammunition have diminished their
ability to fight.
Explains Strategy
One military commander, ex-

ENDING TONIGHT
"ZORBA
The Greek"
Shows at 6:40 and 9:08
THURSDAY
"A hypnotic,
engrossing
film 1"
-Crowther, N. Y. Times
"A CINEMA MASTERPIECE!
A powerful, luminous
and violent
existential thriller!"
-Time Magazine

plaining government strategy,
says the aim is to avoid massive
onslaughts which might win popu-
lar sympathy for the rebels, and
concentrate instead on harrassing
tactics, including swift thrusts
against known rebel bases.
This strategy has worked well.
The number of surrenders last
year topped the 5,000 mark, with
1,255 more during the past two
months alone.
Economic Program
Hand-in-hand with the military
drive is an economic development
program designed to convince the
tribes that their future lies in
cooperation with the government.
Short-term planning includes
helping farmers in the five states
raise profit-making crops and
find a market for them, giving out
loans and technical assistance and
building up village industries.
Long-range five-year plans are
being charted for each state to
tap known but hitherto untouched
potential. Recent exploration in
the Shan state revealed a region
which has 34 million tons of high
grade mineral ores.

h~e rebels rallied arouna Bosch
in launching their revolution.
The United States rejected yes-
terday a Uruguyan proposal that
the UN Security Council call for
an end to hostilities in the Do-
minican Republic and give Sec-
retary-General U Thant a watch-
dog role in the situation.
"Complications"
Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson
told the 11-nation council that

and permit the Dominican people
of choose freely their own govern-
ment.
At the suggestion of Uruguay
and Jordan the council put off
additional debate until tomorrow.
The Uruguayan resolution was
introduced by Ambassador Carlos
Maria Velazquez, who has accused
President Lyndon B. Johnson of
invoking a new "Johnson Doc-
trine" in Latin America. Uruguay
has been critical also of OAS de-
cisions in the Dominican crisis.

to take such measures as ne may
deem appropriate for the purpose
of reporting to the Security Coun-
cil on all aspects of the situation."
But Stevenson countered that
the resolution would not be wise
and that "it might hamper rather
than promote a solution in the
Dominican Republic." He said also
that the resolution contains an
inference that the council was not
encouraging the OAS in its ef-
forts.

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aI
OcPhone 761-0001
i aE n large
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Sponsored by
FRIENDS of the ANN ARBOR
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I

DIAL 5-6290
"'CAT BALLOU'
IS A GEM-
By ALL MEANS
SEE 'CAT BALLOU' !"
-STEVEN HALLER,
MICHIGAN DAILY
s that w-out
whopper of ;...
wese ntere
UCOMIA a HAROLD
"NNESBUT HECHT
in COLUMBIA COLOR
Shows at
13, 5, 7,9 P.M.
Feature 20 Minutes Later
COMING
"NONE BUT TH E BRAVE"

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
.'::.:r....... :"" ::::.......:::":::t::e:t..:::l:.: ".:v...:"::'r.:ti{"is4:"r:{":":{{"}:": . ".......-... . .... . . .

"Enthralling! ,Right
up there with the
French and Italians
in nudity and
erotic passion!"
--Thompson, Journal American

__ . b

The Daily Official Bulletin as an
official publication of The Univer-
sitl of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 12
Day 'Calendar
Federated Garden Clubs of Michigan
Conference-Registration, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:30 a.m.
Administration of National Parks and
Equivalent Reserves Short Course-1040
Natural Resources Bldg., 8:30 a.m.
Center for Programmed Learning for
Business Workshop-Geary A. Rummler,
director, "Using, Evaluating, Selecting,
and Writing Programmed Materials":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Lecture: Prof. James Duesenberry,
Harvard Univ., "The Strategy of Fed-
eral Reserve Policy," Wed., May 12, 4
p.m., East Conference Room (4th floor),
Rackham Bldg.
Lecture: Prof. Herman Chernoff, Stan-
ford Univ., "Sequential Analysis and
Control Theory," Wed., May 12, 4
p.m., 3010 Angell Hall.
Dept. of Speech Tryouts for "Triple
Threat," second University Theatre pro-
duction of IIIA, Frieze Bldg., 4 p.m. and
7 p m.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Organizations who are planning to be
active for the Spring/Summer Term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Affairs by May 26, 1965. Forms
are available in Room 1011 Student
Activities Bldg.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Reg-
ular weekly meeting, lecture-discussion:
"Can God Be Known?" Speaker: Ward
Wilson, Wed., May 12, 7:30 p.m., Room
3-D Union.
Organization of Arab Students, Lec-
ture by Dr. M. Mehdi on the Palestine
Question, Thurs., May 13, 7 p.m., Third
Floor Conference Room, Michigan Un-
ion.
SUMMER THEATRE
WORKSHOP
Graduate & Undegraduate
College Credit Program
3 to 6 Term Hour Credits.
CO-SPONSORED BY
Mich. State University
and
Circle in the Park
Summer Theatre-Grand Rapids

Doctoral Examination for Richard Eu-
gene Flanders, Anthropology; thesis:
"A Comparison of Some Middle Wood-
land Materials from Illinois & Michi-
gan," Wed., May 12, 4017 Univ. Museum
Bldg., 2 p.m.
General. Notices
Parking: Effective immediately, Lot
N-18, Huron at Glenn, will be re-
stricted to staff paid permit parking.
Student Organizations: Registration
of recognized student organizations
planning to be active during the
Spring/Summer Term must be com-
pleted by May 26, 1965. Forms are
available in the Office9of Student Af-
fairs, 1011 Student Activities Bldg. Priv-
ileges such as the use of the Organi-
zation Announcement column in The
Michigan Daily, use of meeting rooms
in University buildings, assignment of
Student Activities Bldg. facilities, etc.
are available to registered organizations
only.
American Chem. Soc. Lecture: Dr. Pe-
ter Yates, Dept. of Chemistry, Univ.
of Toronto, "Recent Work in Organic
Photochemistry," Thurs., May 13, 8
p.m., Room 1300 Chemistry Bldg.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
U.S. Public Health Service-John An-
drews will interview seniors & grad
students Wed., May 19, for Public
Health Program Repres. Degrees in Gen.
Lib. Arts, Journ., Public Health, Speech,
etc. Positions located in most large
U.S. cities. Please call 764-7460 Bureau
of Appointments for appointment.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Alaska State Legislature, Juneau -
Budget & Fiscal Analyst-MA Poli. Sci.,
Public Admin., Econ. or rel. area. Ex-
per. may be substituted for MA. Work
with finance comm. of legislature.
Massachusetts Indemnity & Life In-
surance Co., Detroit-Sales Agent,BA
any field, exper. not req.-will train.
Prefer married man age 20-30, with
sales ability.
National Tuberculosis Assoc.-Various
openings throughout the U.S. for Exec.,
Program & Ass't. Directors. Also 1.
Assoc. Dir., degree, pref. MA, admin.,
public health, or educ. plus 5 yrs.

admin. exper. Located in Wayne County
Mich. 2. Prog. Dir., degree in educ.,
health or rel., some grad study in pub-
lic health plus 2 yrs. exper. located in
Pontiac.
State of Michigan-Training School
Counselor, degree, min. 30 hrs. Soc. and/
or psych. Exper. not req., but grad
study or 1 yr. counseling or soc. work
exper, qualifies for higher rating. Ap-
lication deadline June 7.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB--
City of Paris, San Francisco, Calif.-
Needs College Board Repres. to work
from July 28 to Aug. 28. Pay ranges
$2/hr. Details at 212 SAB.

Books, Baked Goods, Antiques,
White Elephants, Records,
Picture Frames, &,Coffee Shop

GOOD BOOKS
BOB MARS HALL'S
BOOK SHOP
211 S. State St.
OPEN 7 NIGHTS EACH WEEK
til 10 P.M.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Full Time & Evening Employment
18-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week end
occasionally on Saturday, you can maintain your studies and still enjoy
a part-time job doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $67.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. Monday-Friday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment.

GROOM E'S
BATHING BEACH
SAFEST BEACH
in Southern Michigan
Refreshment Center
Ice Cream - Sandwiches
Soft Drinks
Complete Line of
Bathing Suits for Sale
10 Miles North of Ann Arbor
via U S 23
Whitmore Lake, Michigan

Saturday, May 15
8:30-5:30

On porch
of Library

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