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August 24, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

Looser Regulations Passed at U-

The demonstrations at the Uni-
versity of California's Berkeley
campus last fall resulted this sum-
mer in new regulations which give
University of California students
more freedom and the chancellors
of the nine campuses more inde-
pendence.
The new regulations, passed by
the California regents at their
July meeting, affect nearly every
issue that sparked the Free Speech
Movement demonstrations in the
fall.
They liberalize old regulations
on rallies, fund-raising, student

on the Berkeley campus alone.
The report devoted a consider-
able portion of its 85-page length
to the idea of decentralizing the
administration of the university's
ten campuses-an idea implement-
ed by the Regents there this sum-
mer. The report recommended
that each campus be the equiva-
lent of the commonwealth, with
much local autonomy.
When the Byrne report came
out, it met with great criticism, es-
pecially among the regents, a con-
servative body. One board mem-
ber commented at the time of the

The FSU has run into criticism
from students who charge that it
can never maintain the momen-
tum needed to get things done at
Berkeley. Other critics have said
that it can never muster the mem-I
bership needed to bargain with'
the administration.
This summer saw the beginning
of the sentencing of the 653 dem-
Dnstrators convicted after the pro-
tests last fall, and the sentences
Were stiffer than expected. All
will be appealed.
The first batch of sentences
ranged from county jail sentences
for two of the leading Free Speech
Movement demonstrators to fines,
suspended sentences and proba-
tion for the rest.
The stiffest penalties handed out
by Berkeley Municipal Court Judge

Rupert Crittendon were to Mi
ael Rossman, 24, a Free Spe
leader who was given 90 days
jail and two years probation
arrest resistance, and to Step:
De Canio, a non-student editoi
the controversial off-campus m
azine "spider," banned because
alleged obscenity.
The defense attorney for
convicted students described th
as "victims of a deplorable sit
tion which their elders permit
to develop," and called for "
habilitation rather than retri
tion."
Crittendon, on the other ha
emphasized that "no person
no group, no matter how righte
or morally defensible they :
their case to be, may place the
selves above the law."

I

1

I,

(D L

Berkeley Sparked Student Protests Here

S- ". government, political activity and
off-campus speakers. They also
give the chancellors increased gov-
ernmental authority.
Prohibition
--IThe new regulation on student
freedom of activity-the issue that
was the main cause of the fall pro-
tests-prohibits' the student from
'conduct which significantly in-
tereferes with university teaching,
RSDAY, ~ ~ &L w tfulresearch, administration, and the
OPENS THU RSDAY, August26thwith a full stockuniversity subsidiary responsibil-
ties," or which endangers the
stock of school supplies and new and used textbooks safetyaf'the university n
ity or of campus visitors for uni-
versity-related events.
f orall Freshman courses. A university spokesman said the
l anguage was intentionally vague
so that the chancellors could in-
terpret the rules in keeping with
the needs of each campus. Previ-
ous rules were far more explicitly
SNORfreedom, for example in one case
prohibiting all political, activity
1319 S.University 761-07(00which had ramifications off-cam-
pus.
Protestors complained that such
restrictions forced students to be-
come "second-class citizens" in or-
der to get a diploma.
We have tre lowest prices in Ann Arbor. COMPARE! Theneremations stemmed
from the recommendations of the
Byrne report, which was done at
the request of the Regents. It was
the result of an extensive investi-
Come to SBS and pick up a complete list of publishers gation of the Berkeley situation
and of the events leading to it and
prices for allh '.Cth einstitution's handling of the
rres fralFesman texts. See how much you will )?'Otests.
X.sgve. Nowhere else in AA are new texts sold below pub- Highest onthe list of the re-
port's recommendations were those
1' leeking to provide a system cap-
iihers lst. able of dealing with administra-
tive and governmental problems of
the gigantic, geographically scat-
m2$ d university, which nouw nuai-
bers over 70,000 students, more
than 27,000 of whom are located

report's release, that most mem-
bers would not "take the report
very seriously."
However, the Regents finally ap-
proved many of its ideas-em-
bodied in the new regulations-..
after a short power fight in which
moderate members outvoted a
conservative bloc.
Topic
A principal topic of the Byrne
report and a concern of the reg-
ents over the last year-the Free
Speech Movement-dissolved early
this summer, butrwas immediately
replaced by an organization called
the Free Students Union.
The new Free Students Union
has taken as its aim a more
permanent and stable Berkeley
student movement-a movement
which can eventually actmas acol-
lective bargaining unit for the stu-
dents.

VOICE-SNCC-UMSEU
LABOR DAY WEEKEND RETREAT

September 4-6
Friday through Sunday

U. of M.
Fresh Air Camp

Discussion and debate on
University Reform, Student
Economic Welfare, Civil
Rights, Viet Nam, and what
YOU can do in these movements.
RECREATION, FILMS
TOTAL COST-$5.00
Sign up at Registration-Call 761-1320

s A ,,

II

MIPORTANT NIEWS

National Bank
can help you have
a HAPPIER SCHOOL YEAR!

1"^
,, .,
f

b
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Q
U

'FOR ST UDENTSI'
WANTINIG
TELEPHONE SERVICE
Due to the high seasonal demand for service,
we'd appreciate your placing your order ast
soon as possible to avoid any unnecessary
delay in installation.
For the convenience of University students
wishing to order telephone service this fall,
Michigan Bell's Business Office will remain

LOANS
to undergraduates
from onv stt

LOANS.
to, graduate
d~,m~ Pvvd

I

ylstuaenT ana
in the Union faculty members

CHECKING

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SAVINGS

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FOREIGN
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This

is in addition to our regular hours of 8 to 5
Mondays through Fridays.
To place your order, just call 453-7900.

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