100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 24, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THIRE_

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAflE THRFF.

" it ...i li! 1. 11 LrL 1J

Lo

II

i

Hike
(Gontinued from F

Pag

three separate occasio
Democratic Chairman Z
ency has attacked the
labeling the hike "sho
appalling."
"What makes thisc
unexpected and unacce
tion even more incredib
cy said, "is that it follo
on the heels of the larg
priation granted to the'
by state and federal go
in recent years."
But Gov. George Ro
twice defended the
against Ferency's critic
ing the position that th
as an autonomous bo
the right to independe
fees, he has called Feren
ments "sheer poppycock
other in a series of Fe
tasies."
New Rates
When the new tuitio
into effect in the fall,
state residents will be
term at the undergrad
and $190 at the gradu
The corresponding figur
of-state students will b
$550.
However, fees in som
and colleges will be dif
cause of specialized
These exceptions will be
-The law school: $2
and $600 nonresident;
The medical school:
dent and $800 nonreside
-The dental schoo
graduatenand postgrad
grams and the DDS
$400 resident and $80
dent, and
-the public health s
graduate program): $3
and $800 nonresident.

Tuition, Dorm Fees'
ge 1) The $50 residence hall increase
ons State will bring the cost of a triple room
olton Fer- to $895. Doubles will cost $950 and
increase, singles $1010. The category of
eking and "small double," which formerly
cost the same as a triple, has been
completely eliminated.
ptable a- Living Units
le," Feren- The across-the-board hike ap-
ows closely plies to all but four living units.
rest appro- Although with few exceptions
University freshmen are required to live in
vernments residence halls, some students
with sophomore standing or above;
mney has voluntarily signed up last Spring
University for residence hall accommodations
ism. Tak- in 1965-66. Administrators felt
e Regents, that their decision to return might
ard, have have been different if they had
ntly adjust known about the rate increase, so
icy's state- the housing office notified them
" and "an- that they could cancel their con-
rency fan- tracts during the two-week period
following the fee hike.
The housing office has not yet
n rates go processed all replies from such
fees for students. ZOLTON FERENCY

WhIteuer JO .wear... Wherevrer you go, there's a

1
i

Welcome to MICHIGAN

Sensation new style for making

you beautiful.

sys...-

.. ffr ': .. :C}
is i .i yiV
r " 'I, _

*' 1
e,:erS
A.S' :::'::::.
1 S

$174 per
uate level
uate level.
es for out-
e $500 and
ne 'schools
fferent be-
programs.
e:
60 resident
$400 resi-
ent;
I (clinical
luate pro-
program):
0 nonresi-
chool (the
50 resident

a
:.:
:;.

Heyns, Top 'U' V-P,
Wooed byBerkeleyv
(Continued from Page 1)
tacit-could be made now. But short of the presidency, Heyns could
not advance much farther in the University hierarchy than he already
has.
A Detroit News editorial, and many faculty here, advocated he
be made explicitly the number two official at the University, through
the resurrection of the title of "chancellor." Others felt he should
be assured of greater cooperation and support for the many projects
he has initiated here.
Private Meeting |
A week after the California of-

The new tuition structure elim- fer, President Hatcher and the
inates a differential, in effect since Regents met privately and decided
1962, between charges for upper- to make no special move to retain
classmen and lowerclassmen on Heyns. "The decision is being left
the undergraduate level. Brablec, completely up to Heyns," Presi-
with the support of Mrs. Murphy, dent Hatcher said after the closed
fought unsuccessfully to maintain meeting.
this graduated fee scale. The next day, he reported that
For residents the new fees rep- Heyns had asked that no "patch-
resent per term increases of $34 work administrative reorganiza-
for freshmen and sophomores, $19 tion" be enacted on his behalf.
for juniors and seniors, $15 for Heyns did not acknowledge this
graduate students, $25 for students directly, but declared that "I
In the dental school programs list- have been very moved by the
ed above or in the medical school many eloquent expressions of sup-
and $20 for law'students. For non- port for my work here from fac-
residents, the increases are $20 for ulty, students and my adminis-
Juniors and seniors and $50 for all trative colleagues in the schools
other students. and colleges, and these statements
Highest in State will weigh heavily in my final de-
Under the new fee schedule, the cision. The challenge and appeal
University will have the highest of the University comes from
tuition charges of any state school these statements, not from pos-
in Michigan, assuming none of the sible changes."
other nine state institutions raise Tenure Highlights
fees before the 'fall term. In 1964- Heyns' unusually intense sup-
65, the University ranked seventh port within the University has re-
for resident freshmen and sopho- sulted from several aspects of his
mores, third for resident juniors three-year tenure in the academic
and seniors and first for nonresi- affairs vice-presidency.
dents. -Heyns is known as a "faculty
Although administrators expect man." He was a graduate student,
the tuition hike to bring in extra then a member of the psychology
gross revenue of roughly $1.75 mil- faculty, then dean, in the Univer-
lion, the University's net gain will sity's literary college, and thus has
be somewhat less; this is largely close relations with many faculty
due to the $250,000 increase in members. In the vice-presidency,
student aid funds, $150,000 of he has established a reputation
which was added explicity because for consulting the faculty fre-
of the tuition increase. quently in making policy deci-
sions-an extremely popular prac-
tice among a faculty very pro-
Breakl Rules- tective about its own prerogatives.
'= He is known as an .innovator,
an administrator concerned with
O n O rdinance improving the University rather
than just keeping it functioning.
(Continued from Page 1) -Though his job generally iso-
lates him from direct contact with
to authorize what the legislature students, those interested in Uni-
has forbidden, or forbids what versity affairs generally see him
the legislation has authorized, as one of the "student's friends"
There is nothing between the pro- in the bureaucracy.
visions of the state statute and During much of the furor, Heyns
the local ordinance which might himself retreated to a summer
prevent* their effective co-exist- cottage to ponder the California
ence," Breakey explained, offer. On returning, he proclamed
Appeal? himself undecided. But campus
Asked if he - would appeal pundits are betting that the Uni-
Breakey's decision, Kelley replied versity will soon be in the market
that he has not been directly in- for a new vice-president for aca-
volved and neither had the state's demic affairs.
Civil Rights Commission nor any
state agency.
"The litigation," Kelley contin-
ued, "involved local law and local
individuals. We would therefore
be unable to make a determina-
tion, at this point, as to whether
or not we would intervene, until
we have considered the court's
findings. We will then make a de-
termination as to the state's in-
terests in an appeal."
Informed sources close to the
case have speculated that in view
of Kelley's past stand, he will be
forced to appeal this case, makingU
a test case of it.

PRESIDENT HATCHER
Book Store To
Give Discounts
continued from Page 1)
Yale, Texas and Stanford.
Why have such ventures not
been successful at the University?
The main reason, many say, is
a 1929 Regents' bylaw, that for-
bids the University to help "co-op-
erative mercantile organizations
within University buildings" or al-
lowing "circumstances that will
give such enterprises advantages
in the way of lower rents, freedom
from taxation, or other co-opera-
tion on the part of the University."
Schure said that if, by a change
in the Regents' bylaw, the group
could, it would turn over the store
to the Student Government Coun-
nil.
He said that the reason most
other cooperative bookstores with
similar intentions had failed was
because the students did not care
enough to support the ventures.
This left Schure with two al-
ternatives-to agitate for a stu-
dent-owned store or start a strictly
discount business. He chose the
latter.
Schure said previous cooperative
bookstores and book exchanges
have attempted to operate without
adequate finances.

'a .4x
.u
;: c:,'

.: <
; .::
:},:.
:::....:..::::.s:,
sir? 'F: 'i:Y;? ,
.;..5" .psi _ ..
k
{iii ? .
. " Yi
ar

acqueline
and
nnie Shoes

",Oe

to
1499

M
1
l
1
1
i
.I
r>
X
y1
1
A
t1
i
7
i
{
(t[
1

Q
-

I

Heel...4HeeI..the gang'N all here!
Curvy heels, chunky heels . . . every height you love' Pick your styles for campus or
career in plushy suede or polished smooth leather uppers basking in summy in Autumn's
shades. Join the fun . . . collect fashionable little heels. $6.99 to $14.99.

NOW

3

- COUNT 'EM

-3

306 SOUTH STATE

Michigan's Coed's
Favorite Shoe
Department for 1 8 Years

ON THE CAMPUS

GREAT STORES TO SERVE YOU
9 HI-Fi & STEREO EQPT., REPAIR & ACCESSORIES
at 304 S. THAYER-across from Hill Auditorium,

I

I

i!

I - e ,_ ,_ _ - ldmmh

I

- - - m- - - a -

Back to Top

© 2018 Regents of the University of Michigan