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August 13, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-13

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 13,.1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE T]

a

FRIDAY,~~~~~~_ AUUS 13_95_EMCIG NDIYP(E'

#AJ a-" iiJJ

SYRIA, ISRAEL FIGHT:
k UN Agents Halt Border Clash

' DAMASCUS, Syria (JP)-On their
third attempt, United Nations
truce supervisors yesterday halted
,a three hour tank and artillery
duel across the border between
Syria and Israel.
A Syrian spokesman, claiming
"heavy losses" on enemy gun posi-
tions and tanks, reported Syrian

losses as four soldiers and two
civilians wounded. Syria claimed
an Israeli tank was set aflame.
(In Tel Aviv, an Israeli army
spokesman said four persons-
three Arab girls and an Arab
woman-were killed when shells
landed in a Bedouin camp. An-
other Arab girl, a baby and two

F,
Committee.Votes Broader
Minimum Wage Coverage
WASHINGTON (P-Pushing far beyond administration requests,
the House Education and Labor Committee voted'yesterday to apply
a $1.15-an-hour federal minimum wage to 1.3 million agricultural
workers.
This raised to more than 6 million the number of workers which
the committee would bring under the minimum-wage law now
applying to 29.6 million.
President Lyndon B. Johnson asked that its application be
extended to 4.6 million, not including farm hired hands, migratory
workers and sharecroppers whom
' } ~the committee voted on yesterday.

Israeli soldiers were reported
wounded. He said three SyrianJ
tanks were hit by Israeli fire and?
went up in flames. A Syrian re-i
coilless gun position was destroy-s
ed, he added, and he called Syrian
losses "severe," but gave no de-
tails.
(A UN spokesman at Tel Aviv
said supervisors issued three
cease-fire orders before the shoot-
ing stopped.)
No Air Conflict;
A Syrian spokesman here said
Syrian and Israeli planes flew
over the battle area but did not
make contact.
(The Tel Aviv spokesman said
Syrian positions opened machine
gun and tank fire and "our forces'
returned fire.")
The clash occurred at the site
of Syrian operations to divert the
headwaters of the Jordan River.
Syrian forces held their fire
when UN truce supervisors in-l
tervened, but the Israeli positions
continued firing, the Syrian;
spokesman said.,
"Our field artillery and tanks
answered by intensive bombard-
ment of enemy artillery and tank'
positions. Fire was seen erupting
from one enemy tank," the
spokesman said.
He said the shelling continued
until the truce supervisors nego-
tiated the cease-fire.
An Israeli communique said the"
incident started when a Syrian
position opened machine gun and.
tank fire toward a tractor operat-
ing in the demilitarized zone in
the Jordan River area.
The fire was returned by an
Israeli covering unit, so that a
full-fledged tank and artillery
duel developed between the hill
positions on both sides until truce
supervisors intervened and ended
the shooting.
The area is reported quiet. It
was the scene of repeated border
clashes during the last few years.

Goldberg Confers with
Thant on Assessments
UNITED NATIONS (.'P)-Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg con-
ferred yesterday with Secretary-General U Thant, the Soviet repre-
sentative and other UN diplomats before flying to Washington to
make final a new United States policy on past-due peacekeeping
assessments.
UN diplomats believe the U.S. will announce Monday that it
is abandoning its attempts to deprive the Soviet Union, France and
11 other members of their General Assembly voting rights because
they refuse to pay the assessments. But Goldberg insisted that the

House OK's

Public Works Bill

A labor subcommittee has ap-
proved extension of the law to a
total of 7.2 million workers and
the full committee will vote on
the remaining categories Monday
before going on to the question of
raising the minimum wage for
most workers from $1.25 to $1.75.
This increase has been approved
by the subcommittee.
Chairman Adam Clayton Powell
(D-NY) said the new coverage
was approved yesterday by bi-
partisan votes with little opposi-
tion.
The largest remaining groups
for which extension of coverage
will be considered include em-
ployes of automobile and farm-
implement dealers, numbering
about 600,000, and workers in
agricultural processing plants,
totaling about 250,000.
Johnson made no recommen-
dation on the amount of the in-
crease in the minimum wage, say-
ing that Congress should deter-
mine this.
The subcommittee voted a three-
stage increase, to $1.40 in 1966,
$1.60 in 1967 and $1.75 in 1968,
for workers now covered.
The newly covered workers, ex-
cept those in farming, would start
at $1 next Jan. 1, go to $1.15 after
six months and then rise in an-

U.S. position would not be deter-
mined until after further con-
sultations. He and Secretary of
State Dean Rusk will draft rec-
ommendations today to lay before
President Lyndon B. Johnson.
Before Monday
A decision by the President is
expected before Monday, when
Goldberg is to address the special
33-nation committee on peace-
keeping operations.
Goldberg spent the day in New
York consulting representative
delegates, including some from
each of the main geographical
regions.
The new U.S. chief delegate
spent 70 minutes with Thant and
other UN officials, including Un-
dersecretary Ralph J. Bunche, the
top ranking American in the UN
Secretariat.
Refuse To Pay
The Soviet Union, France and
the other 11 nations have refused
to pay the peacekeeping assess-
ments on the ground they were
illegal because they were approved
by the General Assembly instead
of the Security Council.
The U.S. contended that under
Article 19 of the UN Charter they
faced loss of their voting rights
in the General Assembly.
Most diplomats expect the U.S.
to come up with a plan that
would not abandon its legal posi-
tion, but could open the way for
voluntary contributions by the
Soviet Union and other debtor
nations. The contributions would
permit normal functioning of the
Assembly and ease the precarious
financial position of the world
organization.

WASHINGTON (P)-The House
passed a $3.25 billion public works
development bill yesterday after
beating all attempts to cut it.
The measure has been labeled
by its sponsors as a long step to-
ward wiping out pockets of un-
employment and subnormal in-
come in almost every state.
Opponents, mainly Republicans,
branded it a "boondoggle" and
said it would not accomplish the
claimed objectives.
The Senate passed the bill June
1 after boosting it $750 million
above the amount proposed by
President Lyndon B. Johnson. The
House made no change in the
money total but approved com-
mittee alterations which the Sen-
ate is expected to accept without
too much argument.
Voting for the bill on the final
roll call were 215 Democratic and
31 Republicans; against it were 45
Democrats and 93 Republicans.,
In a final gesture, Republicans
lumped some of the rejected
amendments into a package and
forced a roll-call. They lost by vote
of 224 to 163, wth 48 Democrats
and 115 Republicans supporting
the move and 211 Democrats and
10 Republicans opposing it.
The bill is an authorization

AMENDMENTS DEFEATED:

measure spelling out the scope of
the program but not financing it.
A separate appropriation would be
needed to put it into operation.
Sponsors of numerous amend-
ments made only token fights as
it became apparent that admin-
istration forces, with some Re-
publican help, were in complete
control.
The only major amendment
adopted was approved by the bill's
floor manager, Rep. John A. Blat-
nik (D-Minn). Its sponsor was
Rep. Bernard F. -Sisk (D-Calif )
It broadened the formula for mak-
ing depressed areas eligible for
aid by adding about 100 counties
in 29 states. It was adopted by
standing vote of 90 to 56.
Sisk's amendment also increas-
ed from $400 million to $500 mil-
lion annually the amount of
grants that could be made to
finance public works projects in
eligible areas. But it limited that
phase of the program to four
years instead of the five in the
original. bill, thus retaining the
same money total. The grants
could be for as much as 80 per
cent of a project cost.
In addition to the $2 billion for
direct grants, the , bill would
authorize $850 million for long

SECRETARY-GENERAL THANT

term loans and loan guarantees,
$125 million for technical aid to
depressed areas, $75 million to
promote multistate cooperative
programs, and $200 million for
joint projects undertaken by
groups of areas.
Most of the authorizations would
be for five years.
Sienatre Unit
Gives OK to
14B Repeal
WASHINGTON (P)-Legislation
to repeal Section 14B of the Taft-
Hartley Law, which allows states
to outlaw the uion shop, ad-
vanced through a Senate labor
subcommittee yesterday.
But it ran up against a jam
of other administration-backed
bills in the full labor committee,
and Sen. Pat McNamara (D-Mich)
said he did not know when that
body could take it up.
The subcommittee approved the
bill 7 to 1 after voting unanimous-
ly to include a provision designed
to benefit persons who have con-
scientious scruples against join-
ing a union on religious grounds.
The "conscientious objector"
amendment was sponsored by Sen.
Wayne Morse (D-Ore). It provides
that a person who is a member
of a religious sect with tenets op-
posing union membership or an
individual with such scruples
could be exempted from the union
membership requirement if he
agreed- to pay the equivalent of
union dues to a charitable fund.
If the union could not agree on
such a fund, he could be exempt-
ed altogether.
Sen. Winston Prouty (R-Vt)
failed in an attempt to have two
amendments attached to the bill.
Prouty's amendments would have:
--Allowed an election to rescind
a union shop to be decided on the
basis of a majority of those voting.
The present requirement is a ma-
jority of those eligible to vote.
-Provide that the National La-
bor Relations Board could not
invalidate the ,results of a repre-
sentation. election on the basis of
expressions of views by an em=
loyer where these contain no
threats of reprisal or force or no
promises of benefits.

rorld News Roundup

By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - The United
Steelworkers Union accused the
basic steel industry yesterday of
risking a "shutdown of steel pro-
duction rather than consider real-
istically the urgent, critical needs
of steelworkers."
An editorial in the union's
monthly publication "Steel Labor"
criticized the industry for what it
called frittering away bargaining
time and for being obstinate,
shortsighted and self-defeating.

Although the publication went
to press several days ago, a un-
ion spokesman said its criticisms
"still stand." The comment was
the first clear indication that top-
level talks, going on in an undis-
closed location, were still dead-
locked.
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla.--Astro-
nauts Gordon Cooper and Charles
Conrad yesterday entered their
final week of training for the
eight-day Gemini 5 flight which

REP. ADAM CLAYTON POWELL
Aeross
Campus.
FRIDAY, AUG. 13
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."
SATURDAY, AUG. 14,
8 p.m.-The University Players

DAILY OF'FICIAL BULLETIN

hopefully will erase any linger-
ing doubts on whether man can
live in space for the time it takes
to rocket to the moon and back.,
Cooper, 38-year-old Air Force
lieutenant colonel, and Conrad,
35-year-old Navy lieutenant com-
mander, will run through a full-
scale rehearsal today, the last
major milestone before the sched-
uled Aug. 19 blastoff of their Ti-
tan 2 rocket.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
passed without discussion and by
voice vote yesterday legislation
giving Congress members more lib-
eral fringe benefits.
** *
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.-The dep-
uty director of the 1963 March on
Washington said yesterday that
the civil rights demonstrator will
eventually need to be replaced
by a new breed of volunteer.
"Today we are , going to have
to sit down and become thinkers
as well as actors," Bayard Rustin
said during a panel discussion at
the annual convention of Martin
Luther King Jr.'s Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference.
Read
Daily
Classifieds

will present Humperdinck's "Han- nual steps to $1.25, $1.40, $1.60
sel and Gretel." and $1.75.
GEORGE WEIN PRESENTS FESTIVAL PRELUDE *
DETROIT'S
CONCERT
GREATEST
SUNDAY, AUG. 15-COB0 ARENA 8 P. M.
004 0
CBASIE O RBEK
1"s, DAVIS Q /jkGILLESPIE /.
* s 'Carmen MRA[ *, SMITH
- .. . -.- -...-- .-- -.-.. --- -- - - -- - -- --- -
ALL SEATS RESERVED: $3-$4-$5-$6 MAIL ORDERS,
FESTIVAL PRODUCTIONS, INC. C/O COBO ARENA BOX OFFICE
DETROIT 26. ENCLOSE STAMPED, SELF-ADDRESSED ENVELOPE.
TICKETS ON SALE-DISCOUNT RECORDS 'K
F "K
300 S. State, ANN ARBOR
1'w

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily, assumes no editor-
ial responsiblity. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 13
Day Calendar
National Association of Teachers of
Singing Workshop-Registration, School
of Music, 8 am.
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
University Players School of Music
Opera - Humperdinck's "Hansel and
Gretel"; Josef Blatt, music director and
conductor, Ralph Herbert, stage di-
rector: Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Paul
Young, trombonist: Recital Hall, School
of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Events Saturday
"National Association of Teachers of
Singing Vocal Workshop-Registration,
School of Music, 8 a.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Ray-

mond Marchionni, pianist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 4:30 p.m.
University Players School of Music
Opera - Humperdinck's "Hansel and
Gretel"; Josef Blatt, music director and
conductor, Ralph Herbert, stage direc-
tor: Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Composers Forum-
Recital Hall, School of Music.
Events Sunday
School of Music Degree Recital-Ken-
neth Snipes, pianist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club, Folk dance with in-
struction, Fri., Aug. 13, 8-11 p.m.,
Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sunday morning, Aug. 15:
9:15, Bible Class, "Hymns of Faith"
(ps. 91); 10:30 a.m., Service, Vicar
Stephen Stein to preach his final ser-
mon. All welcome. ,

General Notices
Special Notice to Staff Members, Stu-
dents and Univ. Personnel: Applica-
tions for ushering at concerts in Hill
Aud. during the 1965-66 season will be
accepted at the Box Office in Hill Aud.
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Mon., Aug. 23
through Fri., Aug. 27 and on Mon.,
Aug. 30 and Tues.; Aug. 31. See Mr.
Warner.
Doctoral Examination for Michael
Stephen Spritzer, Chemistry; thesis:
"Polarography and Voltammetry in
Nonaqueous Media," Fri., Aug. 13, 3543
Chemistry Bldg., at 11 a.m. Chairman,
P. J. Elving.
Doctoral Examination for Jerry Lor-
en McLaughlin, Pharmacognosy; thesis:
"Identification and Biosynthesis of Cer-
tain Alkaloids of Lophophora williamsii
(Lem.) Coult," Fri., Aug. 13, 4032
Pharm. Res. Bldg., at 1:30 p.m. Chair-
man, A. G. Paul.
Doctoral Examination for Peter Rob-
erts Klaver, English Language & Lit-
erature ;thesis: "The Meaning of the
Term Wit in English Literary Criticism:
1680-1712," Fri., Aug. 13, 2601 Haven
Hall, at 3 p.m. Chairman. H. V. S.
Ogden.
Doctoral Examination for Perry
Cliffe Daniels, Music: Performance;
(Baritone); recitals in lieu of thesis,
Sat., Aug. 14, 3046 School of Music, at
10 a.m. Chairman, Ralph Herbert.
Doctoral Examination for Raymond
John Schneider, Speech; thesis: "A
Study of the Television Program 'Cam-

era Three'," Mon., Aug. 16, 2020 Frieze
Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman, K. E.
Andersen.
Doctoral Examination for Hussein
Zaky Mohamed Barakat, Mechanical
Engineering; thesis: "Transient Natural
Convection Flows in Closed Contain-
ers," Mon., Aug. 16, 2026 Heat Trans-
fer Lab., N. Campus, at 10 a.m. Chair-
man, J. A. Clark.
Doctoral Examination for Julian
Charles Boyd, English Language & Lit-
erature ;thesis: "Deep and Surface
Structure in the Accusative and In-
finitive Expressions in Modern Eng-
lish," Tues., Aug. 17, 2601 Haven Hall,
at 9 a.m. Chairman, H. V. King.
Doctoral Examination for Kendle
Murray Wainio, Nuclear Science; thesis:
"Calculated Gamma Ray Response
Characteristics of Semiconductor Detec-
tors," Tues., Aug. 17, 315 Auto. Lab.,
N. Campus, at 2 p.m. Chairman, G. F.
Knoll.
Doctoral Examination for Richard
Willson Crain, Jr., Mechanical Engi-
neering; thesis: "P-V-T Behavior in the
Argon-Nitrogen System," Tues., Aug. 17,
220 W. Engrg. Bldg., at 9 a.m. Chair-
man, R. E. Sonntag.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., .Aug. 14,
9 a.m. at downtown Post Office, Main
and Catherine. To take test question-
naire must be completed. Details and
applications available at Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Carrier R. & D. Co., Syracuse, N.Y.
(Continued on Page 4)

*1 :

U d

HAVE A DATE EVERY
SATURDAY NIGHT'
You'll finally be able to afford to, if you get
a Honda.
Trade in your gas-eater for a thrifty Honda.
50. Up to 200 miles per gallon, and at least
that many laughs. Maybe more.
Hondas are just the ticket for campus traffic
and campus parking, and you'll notice a big
difference in your pocketbook; too. It'll
bulge for a change.
And so will your date book.

I

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1

DIAL66
662-6264 j;1 Z S U

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at 1 :00-3:35
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BEACH TOWELS...
GRAB YOUR GALS-and
Go-GO-e0o BIKINII

"Peter O'Toole
4. S
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-New York
Herald Tribune'
TECHNICOLOR@

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STANLEY HOLLOWAY- BURGESS MEREDITH - FRANCHOT TONE,- PATRICK O'NEAL- CARROLL O'CONNOR
$UM PICENS- JAMES MITCHUM- GEORGE KENNEDY- BRUCE CABOT- BARBARA BOUCHET
STARTS AUGUST 19TH

-PLUS-

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPARTMENT OF SPEECR
present
THE OPERA DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
TONIGHT (8 p.m.) and TOMORROW (2:30 & 8 p.m.)
in

- -3 - -------- . ...

AM i

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