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August 12, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-12

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AUGUST 12 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THR~EE

olnson Acts

To

. DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
'- -- - --- ---3

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
present
THE OPERA DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
ka ahd 9ete

I

Control Drought
WASHINGTON (P)-President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered fed-
eral crisis teams into New York, Philadelphia and other big eastern
cities yesterday to help speed hard and fast decisions on what must
be done to meet the threat of an acute water shortage.
"This is a time for action-federal, state and local, public and
private," Johnson said.
The President spoke at a White House conference of governors,
mayors, congressional delegations and other officials called to dis-
cuss the four-year drought that is rapidly becoming an emergency in
the afflicted area.
Johnson announced a series of measures to mobilize federal
aid for longer range projects, including a $4-million water resources

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press.
CHICAGO - The American
Medical Association advised the
nation's doctors yesterday they
would risk prosecution under the
Sherman Antitrust Act if they act
In concert through a medical or-
ganization to boycott the new
medicare program.
The AMA trustees added, how-
ever, that "an individual physi-
cian acting independently and not
in concert with others can law-
fully refuse to accept any person
as a patient who is a beneficiary
under the program."
The AMA Board of Trustees
prepared and released its state-
ment on the medicare program to
the medical profession after dis-
cussion with legal counsel.
ATHENS-The Greek govern-
ment yesterday ordered police to
crack down on street demonstra-
tions sweeping the country since
King Constantine removed Pre-
mier George Papandreou almost a
month ago.
John Toumbas, minister of pub-
lic order in the interim cabinet,
told police to tolerate no further
illegal demonstrations-meaning
any but those in enclosed areas.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The United
States yesterday recognized Singa-
pore as a sovereign and indepen-
dent state, the State Department
announced.
* * .*
BAR HARBOR, Maine-A scien-
tist yesterday reported develop-
ment of a "really promising" new
drug treatment for gout, a pesky
worldwide malady that claims
500,000 victims in the United
States alone.
The treatment employs a chemi-
cal weapon uncovered by happy
accident in treating leukemia, re-
ported Dr. James B. Wyngaarden,
until recently of Duke University
SMedical School.
He reported that the still-ex-
perimental drug-which must be
taken daily in pill form-has
shown powers to end recurrent
attacks of gout in about one-third
of victims after they have used
the drug for a year.
* * *
PRAGUE-A Czechoslovak cor-
respondent's report from Hanoi,
published by the news agency
CTK yesterday, told of mass
evacuations of children and old
people from the North Viet Nam
capital.
He said every house has an air
raid shelter, cars are camouflaged
and anti-aircraft batteries prolif-
erate, but he said there was no
panic. He described life in Hanoi
as "nearly ,normal"
THENEW
Ee0A" wCARPENTER ROAD
Open at 7:00-Close at 10:00
TONIGHT

planning survey "for the entire
northeast from Virginia to Maine."
Consultations
Meanwhile the President asked
his Water Resources Council head-
ed by Secretary of the Interior
Stewart L. Udall to consult daily
with city and state officials in
New York, Pennsylvania, New. Jer-
sey and Delaware, the states rep-
resented at yesterday's emergen-
cy session.
Several participants voiced gen-
eral satisfaction with the confer-
ence, although they told newsmen
no immediate solutions developed
for any immediate problems. They
said prospects for the intermediate
and longer range pi'oblems look
better.
In setting up the daily consulta-
tions among federal, state and city
officials, Johnson asked for re-
ports on what action should be
taken.
Government Mobilizing
He said the federal government
already is mobilizing various de-
partments and agencies to help,
including agriculture, health, in-
terior, power commission, Army
Engineers, and the Office of Civil
Defense.
"Should the council find any ad-
ditional action is required," John-
son said, "I am prepared to do
whatever else is necessary."
The Chief Executive keyed the
meeting by signing into law a
$185-million bill to speed up the
program of converting salt and
brackish water into fresh water.
Johnson said the time has come
to take over from an erratic na-
ture the job of producing fresh
water "when and where we need
it at a price we can afford."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Nichigan, for which TheI
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibiity. Notices should be
sent in TYPWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 12
Day Calendar
National Association of Teachers of
Singing Workshop-Registration, School
of Music, 8 a.m.
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Yehoshua Bar-Hillel, Hebrew Univer-
sity, "Semantics-From a Linguistic
Critic's Point of View": Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, '7:30 p.m.
University Players School of Music
Opera - Humperdinck's "Hansel and
Gretel"; Josef Blatt, music director and
conductor, Ralph Herbert, stage di-
rector: Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Rob-
ert Jones, organist: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital-Carol
Pearson, pianist: Recital Hall, School
of Music, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Attention August Graduates: College
of Literature, Science and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music,
School of Public Health, School of
Business Administration: Students are
advised not to request grades of I or X
In August. When such grades are ab-
solutely imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow your in-
structor to report the 'make-up grade
not later than 11 a.m., Aug. 20. Grades
received after that time may defer
the student's graduation until a later
date.
Recommendation for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wish-
ing to recommend tentative August
graduates from the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts, for Honors
or High Honors should revommend such
students by forwarding a letter to the
Director, Honors Council, 1210 Angell
Hall, by 3 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 19.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513 Administration
Bldg., by 11 a.m., Fri., Aug. 20.
Grades-Summer, 1965: Separate in-
structor lists have been sent to de-
partments for the submission of Spring-
Summer grade reports. All grade re-
ports for six-week summer courses
should be submitted to the Registrar's
Office at the earliest possible date.
Grades for courses ending August 18
should be submitted on or before
August 20. The Registrar's Office will
provide grade pick-up for the central
campus on August 18-20. Grades may
also be submitted directly to the of-
fice during regular office hours at
window A, Administration Bldg. Ques-
tions pertaining to grade reports may
be directed to 764-6292.
Doctoral Examination for Richard Ar-
thur Crawford, Music; thesis: "Andrew
Law (1749-1821): The Career of an
American Musician," Thurs.,rAug. 12,
2019 School of Music, at 2:30 p.m.
Chairman, R. A. Warner.
Doctoral Examination for Sandra L.
Lindsay Horne, Human Genetics; thesis:
"Comparisons of Tryptic Peptide Pat-
terns of Erythrocyte Catalase from Man
Non-Human Primates," Thurs., Aug. 12,
301 Special Projects Res. Bldg., at 10
a.m. Chairman, R. E. Tashian.
Doctoral Examination for Larry Karl
.-,"Peter O'Toole
fascinating!"
-New York
Herald Tribun
TECHNICOLOR@

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:35
6 :20-9:00
1

Flanigan, Communication Sciences;
thesis: "A Cellular Model of Electrical
Conduction in the Mammalian Atrio-
ventricular Node," Thurs., Aug. 12,
M6314 Medical Science Bldg., at 9:30
a.m. Chairman, H. H. Swain.
Special Notice to Staff Members, Stu
dents and Univ. Personnel: Applica-
tions for ushering at concerts in Hill
Aud. during the 1965-66 season will be

Foreign

Visitors

The following are the foreign visi- j
(Continued on Page 4)

hhL

accepted at the Box Office in Hill Aud.
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Mon., Aug. 23
through Fri., Aug. 27 and on Mon.,
Aug. 30 and Tues., Aug. 31. See Mr.
Warner.

i

UNIVERSITY TOWERS
will be completed for

by Engelbert Humperdinck
English translation by Josef Blatt
IN LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
TODAY-SATURDAY at 8 .p.m. SATURDAY MATINEE at 2:30 p.m
Tickets $2 and $1.25 tonight and matinee,
$2.25 and $1.50 Fri. and Sat, eves.
Box Office open 12:30 until the 8 p.m. curtain

Velour
and
stretch,
they're
newsy!

FAI

OCCUPA

Icy

now

leasing

a ANN ARBOR'S TALLEST APARTMENT
BUILDING
a Closest to center of Campus
a Plenty of storage space
* Kitchen and dining facilities
" Decorator furnished
a Designed for students
a Student lounge
0 Pool and patio

..

1'

All Sides.

See

Steel Accord
Without Strike
PITTSBtJRGH R)-A feeling of
optimism persists in this steel city
despite reports that tightlipped
basic steel negotiators, racing a
Sept. 1 strike date, are still dead-
locked over money issues.
"No one is talking crisis. Don't
look for federal mediators until
they do," an informed industry
source said yesterday. "Nobody be-
lieves now there will be a strike.
There just isn't any such talk
right now."
This opinion was echoed by
spokesmen for nearly all the ma-
jor steel producers. The most cau-
tious comment came from one of
the biggest steelmakers.
"We're not worried - yet," said
a spokesman, putting the emphasis
on yet.
The union is seeking wage and
benefit increases of 17.9 cents an
hour for each year of the new
contract. The industry has offered
a two per cent increase or about
nine cents.

On Aug. 15, 4 p m. to 8 p.m., the Towers is giving a Mixer at
Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, 707 Oxford. If you have not been
able to find an apartment, stop in.
MODEL APT. OPEN : 9:00 am TO 5:00 pm MON-SAT
7:00 pm TO 9:00 pm MON-FRI EVENINGS
universitylowers
SOUTH UNIVERSITY AT FOREST
ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN 761-2680

(
*T
SI-
M1}A
t s
k
i1

.4.

A

[[/// /
~ Q

"PACKED WITH ACTION FROM
BEGINNING TO END." -Kate Cameron,
DAILY NEWS

FEATURE STARTS
AT 1:00-3:35
6:15.AND 9:05

r

STRIPPED OF EVERYTHING-
THEY LIVED AND LOVED AND FOUGHT
AS IF THERE WERE NO TOMORROW...

i

I

They're great for slop-
ping around, just plain
comfiness without that
sloppy look.
The cotton velour hor-
izontally ribbed shirt
with zip - front turtle
neck. Turquoise, red,
or black. 36-40.

SPREAD OUT THE
BEACH TOWELS...
GRAB YOUR GALS-nd
*,-GO-(e BIK~INlII

"ONE OF THE
FINEST ACTION
PICTURES YOU
WILL EVER SEE
IT'S ALL-STAR
ALL THE WAY."
-Hedda Hopper

I

I

FlqiiMM

Matching
pants in

DIAL
8-6416

nylon stretch
plain knit
90

numm5*

.1.
; A DRAMATIC JOURNEY
WELL WORTH TAKING!"9
-NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE
N4 ARTS PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

Il

I

or rayon/nylon diag-
onal ribbed stretch
pants 7/8-17/18

--PLUS-

z' "FAST-MOVING
yY ENTERTAI NMENT
f.: INTERLOCKING
STALES OF VICE,
VALOR AND
PACIFAIC."
. -TIME MAGAZINE

ol/is

I s I

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