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August 11, 1965 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1965-08-11

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 1965

THE MICHIGAN RAIL' Y

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11, 1 9 6 5 THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~GE THREE

.

Registration, Legislation

Mark

Vote Drive Success

SELMA (P)-Prospective Negro
voters jammed Federal registrars'
offices in three Southern states
yesterday signing up under the
new voting law.
At the same. time the Depart-
ment of Justice moved to erase
poll taxes in three states.

Both actions were part of the
administration's program to make
it easier for Negroes to vote.
Hundreds of Negroes turned out
to register in Selma, the west
Alabama town which, became an
early symbol of the voting rights
struggle. Others packed into the

-Associated Press

small post office at Greensboro,
center of the most recent civil
rights struggle in Alabama.
Overcrowded
At Canton, Miss., so many Ne-
groes turned up at the registrars'
headquarters that some were ask-
ed to come back later. They were
assured that voting rolls would
still be open.
The voting examiners-some of
them Negroes-are part of a spe-
cial Justice department team sent
to nine counties in Alabama, Mis-
sissippi and Louisiana under the
new law signed Friday by Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson.
Meanwhile yesterday, the Jus-
tice department sued to abolish
the poll tax in Texas, Virginia
and Alabama. The move was an-
other step in implementing the
voting rights act of 1965.
Hearing
The department asked that the
cases be heard as soon as possible
by three-judge courts.
Separate but similar suits at-
tacking the state poll tax were
filed in U.S. District Courts in
Austin, Tex.; Richmond, Va., and
Montgomery, Ala.
Congress directed in the Voting
Rights Act that the Attorney Gen-
eral test the constitutionality of
poll taxes in court suits. The
twenty-fourth amendment to the
Constitution forbids any require
ment for payment of a poll tax
in order to vote in Federal elec-
tigns, but the amendment does
not extend to state elections.
Sheriff
Fifty Negroes were waiting to
apply at Selma, when the Federal
Building opened. The building is
across the street from the Dallas
County Courthouse and the office
of Sheriff, James Clark, who ar-
rested more than 3,000 civil rights
demonstrators earlier this year.
Large posters in the building
exhibited warnings of how the
1965 Voting Act makes it a crime
for anyone to "intimidate, threat-
en or coerce any persons from
performing duties" under the new
law.
Another read: "If you want to
vote in a state or local election,
you will have to pay a poll tax.
You may pay it to the examiner."
Poll Taxes
Ekaminers were collecting poll
taxes pending results of the court
tests.
A Negro minister from nearby
Orville, the Rev. Lorenzo Harrison,
says he has tried six times to
register. He has had two years of
college.
Federal examiners, who have re-
fused to answer any questions
from newsmen, told Negroes that
registration would take place six
days a week and that they would
stay as long as needed.

NATIONAL GOALS:I
Committee To Set
'Great Society' Plan
WASHINGTON (P)-President Lyndon B. Johnson is mapping an
effort to spell out the strategy of future domestic programs with a set
of long-range goals for the nation.
Its details are being worked out now, but a top Johnson aide
said yesterday the President envisions a study that will determine how
United States resources can best be used to achieve a wide variety of
aims at home.
"This is an attempt to set up certain hard goals," said White
House Press Secretary Bill D. Moyers.
Getting There
Johnson sketched his plan in broad outline Monday as he signed
a $280 million health research bill. He said a task force of U.S.
leaders from government and private life will seek to tell the nation

By JOHN CANTWELL
Associated Press News Analyst
SINGAPORE-Indonesia is ex-
pected to step up its campaign to
crush Malaysia now that Singa-
pore has left the young federation.
President Sukarno is likely to
view Singapore's separation Mon-
day as a green light to step up
military operations and an indi-
cation that Malaysia is on the
rocks.
The "other war" in Southeast
Asia probably will increase in
gravity, with consequent increas-
ed demands on the British and
Commonwealth forces who are
Malaysia's chief protection.
"Malaysia can expect an on-
slaught from Indonesia in the

coming week." a high military
source said after the split in the
federation was announced.
The source said Indonesia now
is likely to shift its sights away
from this big southeast Asian city.
"The Indonesians might be
tempted to have a go at British
bases here," the source said. "But
if they think they can get Singa-
pore on their side-and Singapore
Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew has
said he wants to cooperate with
Indonesia-they might call a tem-
porary halt to their attacks on
Singapore."
Most military authorities in
Singapore-Britain's biggest base
east of Suez - were pessimistic
about the effect Singapore's sep-j

A FEDERAL EXAMINER watches as Mrs. Ellen Floyd of Booth-
ville, La., registers to vote in Buras, La. She became one of 1,-
144 Negroes registered in nine southern counties and parishes
yesterday on the first day of federally supervised registration.
DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE:
U3.S. Refuses To Abandon
Bases in Forei n Nations
GENEVA (P)-The, United States rejected yesterday a Soviet
claim that no disarmament progress can be made until all foreign
bases are evacuated. It charged that Russian policy is motivated by
the desire to leave weak nations at the mercy of Communist aggres-
sion.
The chief U.S. negotiator at the 17-nation disarmament confer-
ence, William C. Foster, said the U.S. seeks no bases in Viet Nam or
anywhere else. But it has no intention of abandoning smaller and
weaker nations to "the form of aggression which Communists now
call wars of national liberation." Foster appealed to the Soviet Union

.

Expect More Malaysian War

V

"where we are, where we are go=0
ing and how we are going to get
there."
He mentioned two specific items
on the task force agenda: educa-
tion and health. Moyers said the
study bill will encompass the en-
tire range of domestic programs.
Johnson said "We must do this
because . . . we must advance daily
or we will fail eternally."
Johnson said he will be choos-
ing the task force members with-
in days.
Like Ike
Moyers said he does not know
when details of the program will
be made public.
In broad outline; it sounded
similar to former President Dwight
D. Eisenhower's Commission on
National Goals. That was a bipar-
tisan, 11-man commission of lead-
ers in labor, industry, science and
public affairs. Its thick report on
national aims was issued near the
end of Eisenhower's administra-
tion.
One Copy
One copy went to then-Presi-
dent-elect John F. Kennedy, about
three weeks after he was elected.
Some people criticized its find-
ings as vague, and little has been
heard of it since.
Johnson created task forces last
year to deal with education, pov-
erty and a variety of other topics.
Theii major aim was to aid in
the preparation of legislation pro-
posed this year.
"They were tactical," Moyers
said. "This task force and enter-
prise will be strategic in nature."
Housing
Yesterday Johnson indicated
that housing programs would play
a large role in his plans. "We
must make sure that every family
in America lives in a home of dig-
nity, in a neighborhood of pride,
a community of opportunity and
a city of promise and hope.
"We have the resources in this
country. We have the; ingenuity.
We have the courage - and we
have the compassion. I am deter-
minted we shall seek - and we
shall obtain-foi all the people of
all the nation," he concluded.

4>

fI

aration from Malaysia will have
on the morale of those resisting
Indonesian aggression.
"We have seen the first crack
in Malaysia," one said.
Military authorities believe Aug.
17, Indonesia's independence day,
probably will spark the biggest,
most determined attack yet on
Malaysia. Aug. 31, Malaysia's in-
dependence day, is another likely
date for attack.
On the two independence days
last year Sukarno sent paratroop-
ers and other forces into the
Malaysian mainland. Both these
incursions were crushed by se-
curity forces - Malaysians, Brit-
ish, Australians and New Zealand-
ers.
Since then Sukarno has sent
numerous guerrilla teams into
mainland Malaya. In recent
months he has been concentrat-
ing on Singapore.
Sea of Flames
Bombings became commonplace.
Two weeks ago an attempt was
made to blow up the entrance to
the U.S. consulate. Sukarno
threatened to turn Singapore into
a "sea of flames" if Britain step-
ped up aggression against Indo-
nesia, as he put it. Indonesian
Defense Minister Abdul Haris Na-
sution said Singapore must be de-
stroyed before Malaysia could be
crushed.
Sukarno will probably now shift
his sights from Singapore to the
Malayan mainland and Malaysia's
Borneo states of Sarawak and
Sabah.
The Indonesians are expected to
land regular troops and infiltra-
tors in Southern Malaya by boat.
They may try to drop paratroops
into certain areas on the penin-
sula.
Atomic Weapons
Some military observers believe
they might use guided missiles
against strategic military bases. A
recent report said Russia has sup-
plied Indonesia 12 Komar-class,
gunboats armed with surface-to-
surface missiles capable of carry-
ing atomic warheads. Indonesia
has announced that they are work-
ing on an atomic bomb.
In Borneo, the Indonesians are
expected to send more troops
across the jungle border and to
speed up their attempts to stir
up internal trouble.
They have allies in Sarawak,
where some 25,000 Chinese are be-
lieved to be pro-Peking, anti-Ma-
laysia and prepared for armed
revolt.
Indonesia recently stepped up its
training of Chinese from Sarawak,
on its side of the border in guer-
rilla warfare.

-Associated Press
INDONESIAN VOLUNTEERS drill at a training center in Jakarta. Indonesian President Sukarno is
expected to use them in redoubled attacks on Malaysia now that Singapore has left the Malaysian
Federation. Indonesian troops have been training Chinese in nearby Sarawak and are armed with
Russian gunboats.
W.Forld News Roundup

r Across
Campus
WEDNESDAY, AUG. 11
8 p.m.-The University Players
will Present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel" under the musical
direction and conduction of Prof.
Josef Blatt of the music school
and under the stage direction of
Prof. Ralph Herbert of the music
school.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet
will give a concert in Rackham
Aud. It will feature Angel Reyes,
violin; Gustave Rosseels, violin;
Robert Corte, viola and Jerome
Jelinek, cello.
tTHURSDAY,- AUG. 12
7:30 pjn.-Prof. Yehoshua Bar-
Hillel of Hebrew University will
discuss "Semantics-From a Lin-
guistic Critic's Point of View" in
Rackham Aud.
8P ~m-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."
- FRIDAY, AUG. 13
8 ptm.--The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."
SATURDAY, AUG.14
8 p.m.-The University Players
will present Humperdinck's "Han-
sel and Gretel."

to consider urgently the threat of
world wide nuclear proliferation.
Viet Nam
"It is not the kind of threat
that can be averted by the ac-
tions of any one country, nor can
it be averted by focusing our at-
tention on any single country,"
he said, referring to the Soviet
preoccupations with Viet Nam at
the talks. "This must be as clear
to the Soviet Union as it is to my
government."
He accused the Russians of ig-
noring the United Nations Char-
ter in denianding the withdrawal
of all foreign troops as a condi-
tion for disarmament agreement.
"The Soviet ,proposal . . . fails
completely to acknowledge the
right of states to provide for their
own defense by entering into
agreements for the stationing of
troops .and bases of friendly coun-
tries on their territories," Foster
said.
Protection
He accused the Russians of de-
liberately ignoring this so as to
favor their own interests, which
seek to forbid smaller or weaker
countries from protecting them-
selves through arrangements with
other nations.
At previous sessions of the dis-
armament conference, the Soviets
had focused attention on United
States actions in Viet Nam. Some
neutral observers charged the So-
viets used "polemics" about Viet
Nam to slow down the disarma-
ment talks.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-A House com-
mittee approved legislation yester-
day to give the federal govern-
ment broad authority over pro-
fessional boxing matches broad-
cast by radio and television.
The bill was introduced follow-
ing the Cassius Clay-Sonny Liston
bout in Lewiston, Maine, in May,
which ended in a controversial
one-round knockout,
The measure would establish a
three-man Federal Boxing Com-
mission, to be appointed by the

President, with authority to li-
cense-or refuse licenses-to prac-
tically anyone involved in a fight,
including promoters, managers,
referees and the boxers themselves.
WASHINGTON - The House
Science and Astronautics Commit-
tee cleared for House action yes-
terday a bill that may lead the
way to adoption of the metric
system of weights and measures
in the United States.
Introduced by the committee
chairman, Rep. George P. Miller
(D-Calif), the bill would author-
ize a three-year study by the Com-
merce Department at a cost not
to exceed $2.5 million.
** *
NEW DELHI - Indian troops
and police clashed with groups of
armed "Pakistani infiltrators" at
several places in Kashmir yester-
day and, there were one or two
pitched battles, a government
spokesman reported.

Press dispatches from Karachi,
Pakistan, said heavy fighting was
in progress in the Sprinagar and
Poonch areas of the border prov-
ince claimed by each nation.
At UN headquarters in New
York, a spokesman said Secretary-
General U Thant has made a per-
sonal appeal to both India and
Pakistan to exercise restraint.
* * *
BIRMINGHAM-The Southern
Christian Leadership Conference,
riding a crest of civil rights vic-
tories, pointed its annual con-
vention toward a new dimension in
the Negro struggle--"The Grand
Alliance."
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
SCLC president, said before Mon-
day's opening session that his
group feels it is time to stress
alliances-with labor unions, re-
ligious organizations, the academ-
ic community, and liberal thinkers
-in implementing gains.

1 I

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULETI

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturdayand Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 11
Day Calendar
National Association of Teachers of
Singing Workshop-Registration, School
of Music, 8 a.m.
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
University Players School of Music
Opera - Humperdinck's "Hansel and
Gretel"; Josef Blatt, music director and
conductor, Ralph Herbert, stage di-
rector: Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Stanley Quartet Con-
cert-Angel Reyes, violin; Gustave Ros-
seels, violin; Robert Courte, viola; Jer-
ome Jelinek, cello: Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Summer Hopwood Awards: All manu-
scripts must be in the Hopwood Room,
1006 Angell Hall, by 4:30 p.m. on
Thurs., Aug. 12.
Grades-Summer, 1965: Separate in-
structor lists have been sent to de-
partments for the submission of Spring-
Summer grade reports. All grade re-
ports for six-week summer courses

should be submitted to the Registrar's
Office at the earliest possible date.
Grades for courses ending August 18
should be submitted on or before
August 20. The Registrar's Office will
provide grade pick-up for the central
campus on August 18-20. Grades may
also be submitted directly to the of-
fice during regular office hours at
Window A, Administration Bldg. Ques-
tions pertaining to grade reports may
be directed to 764-6292.
Doctoral Examination for Jon Michael
Wefald, History; thesis: "From Peas-
ant Ideals to the Reform State: A
Study of Norwegian Attitudes toward
Reform in the American Middle West,
1890-1917," Wed., Aug. 11, 3906 Haven
Hall, at 9:30 a.m. Chairman, John Hig-
ham.
Doctoral Examination for Leslie
Thomas Breidenthal, Music: Perform-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
s * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Wednesday evening, Aug.
11: 9 p.m., book review, "The Chris-
tian Meaning of Money"; 10 p.m., in-
formal devotion, Vicar Steve Stein,
speaker, communion to be celebrated.
All welcome.
Young Republicans, Fall membership
meeting, all welcome, Aug. 12, 3 p.m.,
2535 SAB.

cqY ., yA', 'y '. y''". LYr 'r+,"h '.";'"'trP:vrr,{? ?. g.4 }a.;
7i1'Y "..'H 4 ' Y 1' O}:.1Y: 'h"::ti{'CA{"::: '%4'i'iYi: L:'

"Can I get
every money and
banking service
at one place?"
r mft m...m._.._ m.. ___............
YES,
at our Bank.
Visit us for ONE-STOP
Banking..

ance (voice); recitals in lieu of thes-
is, Wed., Aug. 11, 2324 School of Mu-
sic, at 4:30 p.m. Chairman, J. M. Mc-
Collum.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps Placement Test-Deter-
mines in what capacity you can best
serve. Test will be given Sat., Aug. 14,
9 a.m. at downtown Post Office, Main
and Catherine. To take test question-
naire must be completed. Details and
applications available at Bureau of Ap-
pointments.
POSITION OPENINGS:
U.S. Civil Service Comm., Wash., D.C.
-Careers in soc. work including 1. Soc.
Worker. M.S.W. Higher rating for ex-
per. 2. Soc. Work Assoc. & Soc. Service
Repres. BA, 3 yrs. welfare exper., or
equiv. comb. educ. & exper.
Ford Motor Credit Co., Dearborn -
Jr. Accountant. No exper. necessary.
Could be student-hours 3:30-midnight.
Carter's Ink Co., Cambridge, Mass. -
Research position-emphasis in electro-
chem. dev. PhD or near in Physical
Chem.
Gilliland Construction Co., Alpena,
Mich.-Openings in road construction.
Engrg, bkgd. desirable or mech. in-
clined. No exper. required.
City of Saginaw, Mich.-Ass't. City
Attorney. Law degree plus Mich. Bar
admission. Help administer new city
income tax law, prepare & try munici-
pal cases, etc.
Ideal Industries, Inc., Sycamore, Ill.
-Immed. openings for mech. & elect.
engrs. Degree, 4-10 yrs. des, & dev. ex-
per.
Atwood Co., Rockford, I. - Prod.
Des. & Dev. Engr. BS ME or equiv., ex-
per. in metal stampings, etc. Knowl,
of tool & die work desirable.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
"Peter O'Toole
t t iS
' :eiU- FA A . .tM ln

STUDLNT 300K S9RVICG
will open for the Fall term at
1319 South University
We will sell texts for less
and buy for more
We still need good used texts
for all introductory courses
Best prices in town!
Call 761-0700, 761-0758, 663-1297

I

U

I

DIAL 8-6416
"YOU CANNOT
AFFORD TO MISS IT!
THE 'DAVID AND USA' OF THIS YEAR"
-New York Hemi ril 7b~.
' NIOTING I
BUT A MAN"
and-
Thursday
"TAXI FOR TOBRUK"
and "STORK TALK"
EnLu m" On CARPENTR ROAD
Open at 7:00--Close at 10:00
TONIGHT
SPREAD OUTTH E
BEA CH TOWELS...
GRAB YOUR GALS-and
GO-GO-GO BIKINII
1
-I
)i
uITE6
SCREENy
ARTS.
ira.

Dial
662-6264

ENDS TODAY
"THE SONS OF
KATIE ELDER"

STARTING THURSDAY
STRIPPED OF EVERYTHING-
THEY LIVED AND LOVED AND FOUGHT
AS IF THERE WERE NO TOMORROW...

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The 1965
Danish Christmas Plates
will be rare again this year.

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