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August 10, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-10

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0, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PA

GE TH

Viet Con

Downs U.S.
66-Day Seige

Plane

in

Voting Law May Bring
Change in Registration
MONTGOMERY OP)-The new voting law can bring revolutionary
changes in the political affairs in 11 Alabama counties whereNegroes
now have a population majority but few votes.
A 12th county also has more Negro than white residents, but
Negroes already have a voting majority there and hold public office.
If the eligible but unregistered Negroes in the 11 other counties
take advantage of the newly enacted law in substantial numbers,
they can gain the balance of power-and even a voting majority-
in time for the election of county officials next year. There is no
chance for a statewide Negro plurality at the voting booth within

SAIGON ()-Viet Cong guer-
rillas shot down a United States
Air Force F100 fighter and snipped
at a government road-clearing
party yesterday to maintain a
66-day-old siege of the special
forces camp at Duc Co, 220 miles
northeast of Saigon.
Briefing officers gave this ac-
count of other activity:"
Government forces killed 17 Viet
Cong and captured nine in a
sweep near Ba Gia, four miles
west of the coastal city of Quang
Ngai, while they suffered no
casualties.
A thousand men of the U.S.
Army's 1st infantry division de-
stroyed 18 Viet Cong huts, 13
bunkers and two bridges in a
weekend push through a stretch
of jungle east and southeast of
their base at Bien Hoa, 12 miles
northeast of Saigon. No guerrillas
were'sighted.
Continued Harassment
The Viet Cong, continued har-
assment of government outposts
and watchtowers from 100 to 120
miles southwest of Saigon in
Chuong Thien province, firing on
five with mortars and small arms
in the night. No casualties were
reported on either side.
U.S. Air Force planes were
credited with destroying 365 build-
ings and sinking a number of
sampans during 126 sorties against
the Viet Cong in the 24-hour
period ending at 6 a.m. Similar
strikes were carried out by U.S.
Navy and Marine Corps planes.
The Vinh Army barracks, hit
repeatedly last week, was again a
major objective in raids on North
Viet Nam.
Attacked-Barracks
Sixteen U.S. Navy planes at-
tacked the barracks. Pilots said
they destroyed 10 buildings, dam-
aged. six, knocked out an anti-
aircraft site and left the area,
ablaze.
Spokesmen claimed the raiders
returned safely.
Radio Hanoi declared six were
shot down.
The U.S.. presented South Viet
Nam's Air- Force with its first
jet planes, four B57 Canberra
bombers.
Brig. Gen. Nguyen Cao Ky, the
premier who still commands the
air force, flew the first B57 past
U.S. and Vietnamese officials who
assembled for the ceremony at
Saigon's Tan Son Nhut airport.
Military officials reported U.S.
armed forces in Viet Nam, build-
ing toward a total of 125,000,
numbered about 82,400 last Thurs-
day.
Other Developments
Among developments elsewhere
concerning the war:

r Red China charged that U.S.
warships and planes attacked
Chinese fishing vessels off Hainan
island July 19 and Aug. 2 and
that a vessel hit in the first attack
is missing with six crewmen. A
broadcast dispatch of the New
China News Agency declared "they
are piratical acts, openly sabotag-
ing the peaceful work of fisher-
men at sea, and are deliberate
provocations against the Chinese
people."
North Korea's Communist
party newspaper Rodong Shin-

moon declared North Korean's are
determined to share life and death
with the Vietnamese "in the
struggle against the U.S. imperial-
ist aggressors, the common
enemy.'
r Cambodia's chief of state,
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, said on
a visit to Paris that his country
would not tolerate the presence of
Viet Cong troops. He denied a
Saigon charge that his neutralist
government is helping to supply
Communist forces in Viet Nam.

the foreseeable future, unless
white voters stay home. For the
state as a whole, the Negro ac-
counts for only about 35 per cent
of the population.
But in 12 counties, there are
more Negroes than white resi-
dents, ranging all the way from a
bare 50.7 per cent majority in
Monroe to 83.5 per cent-or more
than 5 to 1, in Macon.
However, for some unexplained
reason, in two of the 12 counties
-Monroe and Barbour-the num-
ber of white residents of voting
age is greater than the Negro
voting-age population. At least it
was when the last census was
taken in 1960.
So, unless there has been a
significant change, there is little
immediate likelihood of a Negro
majority in those counties.
In Macon, whose county seat is
Tuskegee, Negroes elected city and
county officials last year and
probably will put others in office
in 1966.
Negro registration has increased
noticeably since Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr. began his civil
rights campaign in Selma last
January and ultimately spread it
across the state's soil-rich Black
Belt.
But even with those gains, fewer
than 20 per cent of the Negroes
21 years of age and older can vote
in most of the counties where
they outnumber white residents.
Macon is the notable exception.
An estimated 4,200 Negroes and
only 2,900 white voters are regis-
tered in the county.

Registrars
To Go South
WASHINGTON W)-The federal
government sped two registrars to
each of nine deep ,south counties
yesterday. Today they will begin
registering Negroes to vote under
the new voting rights act.
The counties in Alabama, Loui-
siana and Mississippi were desig-
nated by the justice department
as launching places for federal
activity under the new act.
One of the most familiar racial
trouble spots of recent years ap-
peared on the list: Dallas county,
Ala., of which Selma is the seat.
It was racial turbulence there last
spring that produced much of the
impetus which brought passage of
the new act.
Atty. Gen. Nicholas Katzenbach
said the other counties in Ala-
bama are Hale, Lowndes and
Marengo. The three parishes in
Louisiana where federal exam-
iners will set up shop today are
East Carroll, East Feliciana and
Plequemines. The two affected
counties in Mississippi are Le-
Flore and Madison.'
The department announcement
did not identify the registrars.
The attorney general said he is
ready to designate other southern
counties for activity by federal
examiners but withheld this ac-
tion "in view of indications of
compliance, particularly in Geor-
gia.

UNITED STATES PARATROOPERS march through the scorched
Vietnamese jungle on a mission to clear out hiding Viet Cong
rebels. None were found. The Viet Cong, however, shot down a
U.S. fighter in sharp action yesterday.,

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day,
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 10

STUD=NT BOOK SGRVICG
will open for the Fall term at
1319 South University
We will sell texts for less
and buy for more
We still need good used texts,
for all introductory courses
Best prices in town!
Call 761-0700, 761-0758, 663-1297

Day Calendar
National Association of Teachers of
Singing Workshop-Registration, School
of Music, 8 a.m.
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Linguistic Institute Forum Lecture-
Yehoushua Bar-Hillel, Hebrew Univer-
sity, "Semantics-From a Linguistic
Logician's Point of View": Natural Sci-
ence Aud., 7:30 p.m.
General Notices
Summer Hopwood Awards: All manu-
scripts must be in the Hopwood Room,
T AsAngell Hall, by 4:30. p.m. on
Thurs., Aug. 12.
Recommendation for Departmental
Honors: Teaching departments wish-
ing to recommend tentative August
graduates from the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts, for Honors
or High Honors should revommend such
students by forwarding a letter to the
Director, Honors Council, 1210 Angell
Hall by 3 p.m., Thurs., Aug. 19.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513 Administration
Bldg., by 11 a.m., Fri., Aug. 20.
Attention August Graduates: College
of Literature, Science and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music,
School of Public Health, School of
Business Administration: Students are
advised not to request grades of I or X
in August. When such grades are ab-
solutely imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow your in-
structdr to report the make-up grade
not later than 11 a.m., Aug. 20. Grades
received after that time may defer

the student's graduation until a later
date.
Doctoral Examination for Jack Dia-
mond, Pharmacology; thesis: "Effect of
Various Drugs on Rat Uterine Motility
and Phosphorylase Activity," Tues.,
Aug. 10, M6314 Medical Science Bldg.,
at 10 a.m. Chairman, T. M. Brody.
Doctoral Examination for Jan Wayne
Jacobs, Education; thesis: "Leadership,
Size, and Wealth as Related to Cur-
ricular Innovations in the Junior High
School," Tues., Aug. 10, 3206 UHS, at
3 p.m. Chairman, L. W. Anderson.
Opening Tomorrow: The University
Players of the Department of Speech
present the Opera Department of the
School of Music in "Hansel and Gretel."
This immortal operatic masterpiece will
play a total of five performances in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre: Wed.-
Sat., Aug. 11-14 at 8 p.m.; and a
matinee performance at 2:30 p.m. on
Sat., Aug. 14. Tickets are $2.00 and $1.25
for Wednesday and Thursday evenings,
plus the Saturday matinee; $2.25 and
$1.50 are the prices for Friday and
Saturday evenings. The box office will
be open today from 12:30 until 5,
and until 8 p.m. on performance dates.

Degree in Bus., Public
Admin., Educ., Phych.,
exper. pref.

Foreign

,or Personnel
or rel. 1 yr.

Visitors

ENDING WEDNESDAY
FeatureStarts at 1]:00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:20

Dial 662-6264

PARAMOUNT PICTURES PrarmN
-JOHN DEAN
Of EIWER
LYER- MCHAEL ANDERSQN.JR. -EARLHOWMAN-JERELAE
£-AEa'.ik . wa I mI ent I vA

"Peter O'Toole
fascinating!"
-New York
Herald Tribune
TECHNICOLOR®

The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 784.2148.
Park Choon-ho, curriculum and text-
book officer, Ministry of Education, Re-
public of Korea Government, Seoul,
Korea, Aug. 10-17.
Miss Zenida Atienza, instructor in
speech and drama, University of the
Philippines, Diliman, Rizal, Philippines,
Aug. 15-18.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
TUES., AUG. 10-
City of Flint, Mich. -' Accountant
Trainee. Min. 2 acctg. courses-acctg.
degree not req. Also Personnel Tech.
DIAL 8-6416
ENDING WEDNESDAY
"A GREAT MOVIE'
- Life Magazine

POSITION OPENINGS:
Superwood Corp., Duth, Minn.-R. &
D. Chemist for hardboard & wood fiber
mfr. Degree in chem., bkgd. in or-
ganic. Knowledge of wood chem. or
resin tech. desirable.
Harper Hospital, Detroit-Medical So-
.cial Worker. Immed. opening for: man
or woman, M.S.W. No exper. req.
Ford Motor Credit Co., Dearborn -
1. Organization & research position
in treasurer's office. Math major. B
plus avg. Trng. or exper. in Data Proc-
essing. 2. Bus. Admin. grad for leas-
ing dev. div., some acctg. & econ. Ex-
per. helpful.
Fleming, Medura & Conrad, Assoc.-
D.P. Programmer. Immed. opening. De-
gree in math or engrg. Computer ex-
per. req. Age 23-30.
City of Muskegon Hts., Mich.--Civil
Engr. Degree in CE desirable. Will con-
sider exper. in surveying & drafting,
or rel. No exper. required.
Mid-States Broadcasting Corp., East
Lansing, Mich.-Position for recent ac-
counting grad. Some exper. desirable
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Reg-
ular meeting Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m., Room
3D, Michigan Union. Speaker, Dr. Er-
nest Campbell, minister, First Presby-
terian Church.
THE NEW
0na4.mo.CARPENTER ROAD
Open at 7:00-Close at 10:00
ENDS TONIGHT
"THE TIME TRAVELLERS"
and
"LOST WORLD OF SINBAD"
STARTS
TOMORROW

JONN WAYNE
KIRK DOUGLAS
PATRICIA NEAL
TOM TRYON
PAULA PRENTISS
BRANDON de WIDE
JILL NAWORTIN
DANA ANDREWS
&NENRYFONDA

STAKI INCA 1 MUK3UAT

"YOU CANNOT
AFFORD TO MISS IT!
TBE 'DAVID AND LISA' OF THIS YEAR"
-New York Herald Tribune

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:35
6:20-9:00

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH THIS WEEK !
present
THE OPERA DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
in

PLUS-

MIT~l A MAN"

I

i

I

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