100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 04, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1965-08-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IDACIV lip'"Qr, L

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THMCIGNAL

P.AUL HRE

i

$1.75 Minimum

Wage

!AJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:

With

Wider Coverage

Tiger Win Marked
By Nine-Run Rally

Proposed in New Bill

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON--A House La-
bor Subcommittee yesterday ap-
proved a landmark bill that would
increase the federal minimum
wage to $1.75 and would cover
6.1 million more wage-earners
than present laws.
The bill would extend coverage
for the first time to farm, hotel,
hospital and laundry workers.
The new coverage exceeds the
recommendations of President

Lyndon B. Johnson, who had ask-
ed for 4.6 million more wage-
earners to be covered. The sub-
committee increased that to 6.1
million by adding 800,000 more re-'
tail and service employes and 700,-
000 farm workers.
No Double Time
The subcommittee rejected a
Johnson proposal that double time
be paid for overtime in an effort
to discourage its use and spread
employment.

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The House sped to the Senate yesterday for
final congressional approval a landmark bill intended to make sure
southern Negroes are not blocked from voting.
The Senate, is expected to act on the measure tomorrow, sending
it to President Lyndon B. Johnson to sign into law.
PRETORIA, South Africa-The color bar in South Africa's gold
mines is to remain, Premier Henri Verwoerd's government decided

Johnson made no recommenda-
tion for a wage increase. "He left
it to the judgment of Congress,"
said Rep. James Roosevelt (D-
Calif), chairman of the subcom-
mittee. "And we have exercised
our judgment."
Roosevelt said the subcommit-
tee realized it was taking a revo-
lutionary step in urging that fed-
eral wage legislation be extended-
to agricultural workers and de-
cided to move slowly. Only pro-
duction workers were covered by
the original measure with retail
and service employes being added
in 1961. About 29.5 million work-
ers are now covered.
Coverage
The subcommittee p r o p o s a 1
would cover all migratory farm
workers, tenant farmers and
sharecroppers, and the hired
hands on farms employing five or
moreworkers. This would amount
to about 40 per cent of farm em-
ployment, Roosevelt said.
The subcommittee set three dif-
ferent schedules for increasing
wages. Those presently getting the
$1.25 would go to $1.75 in three
annual steps. The ndwly covered
nonfarm workers would start at
$1 next January and reach $1.75
by 1970. The farm workers would
start at $1.15 next July and go to
$1.25 two years later.
Roosevelt said the full Educa-
tion and Labor Committee would
take the bill up next week. He
predicted it would be quickly ap-
proved and be ready for, House
action by the end of the month.
The largest number of newly
covered workers - 2.5 million -
would be brought in by a change
in the definition of .a chain-type
establishment. At present such es-
tablishments must gross $1 million
a year and their individual units
more than $250,000 before their
employes are covered. The sub-
committee would lower the estab-
lishment's cut-off to $250,000 by
1968 and the individual unit's to
$150,000.1

SOVIET CHIEF DELEGATE Semyon K. Tsarapkin briefs newsmen after his speech at yester-
day's meeting of the I7-nation disarmament conference in Geneva. Tsarapkin's speech, where he
told the conference that a nuclear force proposed by the United States in Europe is "absolutely
unacceptable" to the Soviet Union, made the outlook for progress toward disarmament appear dim.
1'Polemics' Mar Weapons Meet

yesterday. White miners had
threatened to strike if the min-
ing companies' attempts to break
the color bar were not stopped.
After a cabinet meeting, Mines
Minister Jan Haak said one rea-
son for the decision was increas-
ing pressure from the white min-
ers. He said mining companies re-
cently experimented in upgrading
black miners. N
Under South African "job pres-
ervation" laws, most skilled and
semi-skilled jobs can only be fill-
ed by white. But an acute man-
power shortage has resulted in
large numbers of nonwhites get-
ting jobs formerly reserved for
whites only.
RAWALPINI, Pakistan - The
Communist Chinese ambassador,
to Pakistan said yesterday. Peking
will make more economic aid
available to Pakistan.
The Pakistani government, an-
gered by the postponement of a
World Bank aid consortium meet-
ing at United States request, was
also reported to be seeking extra
aid from the Soviet Union.
SPINAGAR, Kashmir - A team'
of experts will fly to Moscow soon
to negotiate the purchase of So-
viet submarines for the Indian!
navy, Defense Minister Y. B.
Chavan said yesterday.
* * *
GREENSBORO, Ala.-Less than
half the 93 Negroes who took
Alabama's new simplified voting
test here made a passing mark,
the chairman of the Hale County
Board of Registrars said.
Mrs. Sue Seale; board chairman,
said only 39: made a passing grade
of 60 or better.

By The Associated Press
GENEVA-Prospects for prog-
ress on world disarmament seem-
ed more remote than ever yester-
day as the United States and the
Soviet Union clashed about Viet
Nam at the 17-nation disarma-
ment conference here.
Chief Soviet negotiator Semyon
K. Tsarapkin said his country will
never sign a treaty to halt the
spread of nuclear weapons as long
as the West continues with its
Plans to create an Atlantic nu-
clear force.
He followed this up with a
violent attack on American "ag-
gressive imperialism" in Viet Nam
and, elsewhere, claiming that the
U.S. has "one million officers and
men--more than one-third of its
total military force" in foreign
bases.
West German Blackmail,
He also accused West Germany
of applying blackmail against the
West in seeking to satisfy what he
called its desire for access tQ
nuclear weapons via the proposed
Atlantic nuclear force.
The clash reduced hopes of
getting the Russians to agree to

a British-sponsored draft treaty
to halt the spread of nuclear
weapons. Westernl differences over
the draft, are still being ironed
out, but it is expected that it will
be put before the conference as a~
jointuWestern proposal within the
next two weeks.
The Soviet Union has thus far
flatly rejected the Western argu-
ment that an Atlantic nuclear
force would constitute an active
arms control measure by putting
non-nuclear powers such as West
Germany virtually under the con-
trol of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization nuclear powers.
More Proliferation
The Soviet Union claims such a
forc would give West Germany
access to nuclear weapons and di-
rectly or indirectly would result in
further proliferation.
William C. Foster, head of the
U.S. Arms Control and Disarma-
ment Agency, deplored what he
called Tsarapkin's "propaganda,
villification and distortion."
He said Viet Nam has nothing
to do with disarmament and that
the U.S. is determined to sup-
port a nation "whose Only offense

is its determination to% live in
peace and freedom."
Backing
Foster was strongly backed by
Italian delegate Francesco Caval-
letti, who accused Tsarapkin of
introducing "polemics and venom"r
into the talks.
British Disarmament Minister
Lord Chalfont has expressed hope
that the tough Soviet line may
be just a negotiating position. But
since arriving for the reopening
of the conference July 27 Tsarap-
kin has given no indication that
the Soviet Union may be prepared
to modify its uncompromising at-
titude.
In his attack on the United
States Tsarapkin said: "How can
we count on improvement in the
international situation or on prog-
ress in this conference while the
U.S. continues with a large-scale,
punitive war to suppress the na-
tional movement in Viet Nam?"
He repeated his assertion that,
the evacuation of foreign bases,
should have priority over a trea-
ty to halt the spread of nuclear
weapons.

By The Associated Press
The. Detroit Tigers exploded for
;nine runs in the fifth inning,
'routing rookie Steve Hargan, who
was making his first major league
start, and went on to a 12-7 vic-
tory over the Cleveland Indians
last night..
Ron Hansen's bases-loaded tri-
ple produced all the White Sox'
runs as Chicago nipped the New
York Yankees 3-2.
Pitcher Earl Wilson socked a
three-run homer and his Boston
teammates added four triples as
the Red Sox subdued Kansas City
10-5.
American League-leading Min-
nesota, playing without injured
Harmon Killebrew, split a double-
header with Washington, winning
the first game 4-3 but dropping
the second 4-2.
Senator third baseman Don
Zimmer, who made two errors on
one play allowing the Twins to
score the deciding rung in the first
game, slammed a two-run double
that helped Mike McCormick pick
up his sixth victory in the night-
cap.
Bill Faul,. Ray Washburn and
Vern Law all turned in shutouts
in the National League.
Faul hurled a two-hitter and
struck out nine as Chicago blank-
ed Philadelphia 2-0.
Washburn set down Houston 7-
Oin the second game of a double-
header after the Astros had tak-
en the opener from St. Louis 10-7.
Houston won the opener with
Jim Wynn's three-run homer the
big blow. Bob Aspromonte also
drove in three runs and 18-year-
old Larry Dierker, who was the
winning pitcher, hit his first ma-
jor league home run.
Law allowed just three singles
and blanked the Mets for the third
time this season 7-0.
Leo Cardenas' 11th inning
'M' Cagers Win
Another Game'
PORT SAID, Suez Canal Zone
0')-Michigan's touring basketball
team romped to an easy 66-47
triumph over the Suez Canal Zone
team yesterday, the American's
second straight victory.
Michigan, runner-up to UCLA
in the national championships,
led all the way, had a 29-16 half-
time advantage and wasn't pressed
in the last half.

Minnesota
Baltimore
Cleveland
Detroit
Chicago
New York
Los Angeles
Washington
Boston
Kansas City

W
67
60
59
58
57
52
48
46
39
34

L
39
43
44
45,
46
56
56
61
64
66

Pet.
.632
.583
.573
.563
.553
.481
.462
.430
.379
.340

GB
16
18
21~
26 V
30

throwing error with the bases
loaded allowed two Giant runs to
score and helped San Francisco
to a 6-3 victory over Cincinnati.
Baltimore narrowed Minnesota's
American League lead to 5?
games with a 5-2 victory over Los
Angeles.
Lions Sg
End Kramer
DETROIT I--End Ron Kram-
er, who recently bought his option
from the Green Bay Packers, sign-
ed a one-year contract yesterday
with the Detroit Lions, the Lions
said.
By way of compensation, ac-
cording to Lions Coach Harry Gil-
mer, the Packers will get Detroit's
first draft choice next year.
Major League
ta dins
A1MERICAN LEAGUE

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 4-2, Washington 3-4
Chicago 3, New York 2
Detroit 12, Cleveland 7
Boston 10, Kansas City 5
Baltunore 5, Los Angeles 2
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Cleveland (n)
Boston at Kansas City (n).
Washington at Minnesota (n)
New York at Chicago (n)
Baltimore at Los Angeles (2, t-n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

y'....;.
4

Los Angeles
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
San Francisco
Philadelphia
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Chicago
YHouston
New York

W
62
60
57
56
54
55
53
51,
45
34

L.
45
46
45
46
50
53
53
59
59
72

Pet. GB
.579
.566 1I, z
.559 23
.549 31
.519 6/4~
.509 71
.500 8 z
.468 12
.433 15
.321 271/1

=ENDRIKVERWOERD
Across
Campus,
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center will present a
film preview, "Danial Webster," in
the multipurpose room of the
UGLI.
81:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech University Players will.
present Shakespeare's "Measure
for Measure" in Mendelssohn
Theatre.

'} .Yt.1Y .}.}\41 ~A' AM ."f.Mlt"SK'A7.".1T l.M. f. itlt'f:.". ~A4':MA"f.M:::.L':::.1"ALM:f.Mf.VY.MJJA :"11.Y."f "..1":W::S" i4M::i4L1M"'Y.ii :41M, :^ {s.^.M
'.{. " MA4"a'1:1 .}. :.... A"NA':1f{.. f.. .. . .":'.. .AK4.. ..!^1, . .'{:;.'{:: . Y1" ": ':1 : '":Y. .t' ::':'' .' . '':: .'1 !:. . qY1 SJ. t::.":::f. "::.::. 11;.1."@111, p '.A^.{
.....1,J,. .::....~. ..t.....~".' .'Y:::1LL":At.1.......h{1.1iA1 ':".Y"4Xt A'M1AY.....Alf'JN: B. :a.. L: a": ^;. s.M ' A.a.a^s:::, r ::a ;:".MV:a " ; a. e rti ka t .
" " l.r...A......,."^:ti':."::":':t:.ti:t ~::::^::L.4'~..11 .................."L........ "YR"
1
r
DAI,,LY.OFFI,,CI*AL BULLETIN
b.
1y
i1 . ..", .. ..,~~ .MA4 S".i L ,:... ...... 4 :" .......M: Jf:^f .:MJ" L":.. .......,. 1
" M "S~. .'f. a" A^.t t"MA '"1MJ. "1hhMl.MfA", . yM " " ti D,11 M.1.. " L4^A^ 1 1t4^.t i " t4Mf :LMA':1i" s'Yl: A1"JT .l. A.. VtIA " MlVlt"M " "JJA^.MS':1f11 4'ti
N yy 1L. .. .., ' L .-. . ..1J . 1:Y:titi1L. ,.f.1 . :i"V1....:1'": t ', .1 ..'J....... t+f:ti{ :'''.. 1..
"'::y 7, .:' JfA"4 '~.i':'"'. 1:444411M~J }.. ..""1.:4 a 1 J:A A~ \1. ..111r"."J:.":. fl:"..........t.... A........ : L11 .
fA".... .L".1MA"fA"....tt:}> CA.... .: : :.i1Y " ..1~ ..... t. ........ M.... .. ....
Att. ...ln.... 11a....... 1. .L.'.. ". .; 1.'i .±
aYA" .L :f.{'N'A'tA "M'f' u *'^ 't''''A ' c" d:2aa E"A";:. ., .t...... ..
."rA ......... aw,... ..... .-... .. ..", . ". ..A.LL.:.".".t....A.".M:.".^::.vr.::: r::e; """" .Ar.":.v:,"ia tuM:xYa}aa "t PkS11,,atalLt:An1"A1n::}:ii" 'a4. r::ti :.4,^1v h" ' h.>va1h1

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 3 (11 inn)
Chicago 2, Philadelphiao 0
rittsburgh 7, New York 0
Houston 10-0, St. Louis 7-7
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
San Francisco at Cincinnati (n)
Los Angeles at Milwaukee (n)
Houston at St. Louis (n)

Roses are red
Violets are blue,
1here's wishinga
Happy Birthday to You

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 4
'Day Calendar
Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"Daniel Webster": Multipur-
pose Room, Undergraduate Library, 1:30
p.m.
Musical Youth International Concert
-Band and Chorus, Lester McCoy, con-
ductor: Promenade, School of Music,
7 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Carol Ober, clarinetist: Recital Hall,
School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Tonight Is Opening Night for the Uni-
versity Players' production of Shake-
speare's "Measure for Measure" which
will play today through Sat., Aug. 4-
11, at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The Box Office will be open for the
remainderof this week, 12:30 until the
8 p.m. curtain. Tickets are $1.50 or $1
tonight and Thursday, $1.75 or $1.25
Friday and Saturday.
Seats are still available for Hum-
perdinck's "Hansel and Gretal" which
will play Aug. 11-14 at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. This opera will be
performed by the Opera Department
of the School of Music as part of the
University Players' Summer Playbill.
General Notices
Recommendation for Departmental
Honors: Teaching, departments wish-
ing to recommend tentative August
graduates from the College of Litera-
ture, Science and the Arts, for Honors
or High Honors should revommend such
students by forwarding a letter to the
Director, Honors Council, 1210 Angell
Hall, by 3 p.m. Thurs., Aug. 19.
Teaching departments in the School
of Education should forward letters
directly to the Office of Registration
and Records, Room 1513 Administration

Bldg., by 11 a.m., Fri., Aug. 20.
Student I.D. Cards: Any new summer
term students who plan to continue in
the fall term and did not receive a stu-
dent I.D. card should make applica-
tion for a card at Window A of the
Registrar's Office. Any students who
lost their cards or need a new one be-
cause of name change should also make
application at window A. It is strongly
recommended all cards be secured prior
to the end of the summer term. A stu-
dent I.D. card is required of all reg-
istrants for the regular term.
Doctoral Examination for Albert
Theodore Steegmann, Jr., Anthropol-
ogy; thesis: "Relationships between Hu-
man Facial Cold Response and Dimen-
sions of Facial Form: An Experimental
Study in Physical Anthropology," Wed.,
Aug. 4, 2411 Mason Hall, at 9 a.m.
Chairman, J. N. Spuhler.
Attention August Graduates: College
of Literature, Science and the Arts,
School of Education, School of Music,'
School of Public Health, School of
Business Administration: Students are
advised not to request grades of I or X
in August. When such grades are ab-
solutely imperative, the work must be
made up in time to allow your in-
structor to report the make-up grade
not later than 11 a.m., Aug. 20. Grades
received after that time may defer
the student's graduation until a later
date.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
Dr. Vessal, University of Tehran, Teh-
ran, Iran, Aug. 4.
Cheong You, member of National As-
sembly, Republic of Korea, Aug. 6-8.
Placement
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint-
ments with the following:
WED., AUG. 4-
Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., Hart-
ford, Conn.-Seeking degrees in Gen.
Lib. Arts, Econ., Educ., Law, Lib. Sdi.,
Math, Public Health, etc. Positions in
insurance including home office, claims,
sales, acctg., surety bonds ,etc. Loca-

tions throughout U.S.,
TUES., AUG. 10-
City of Flint, Mich.-Personnel Tech-
nician. Degree in bus. admin., public
or personnel admin., educ., psych. or
rel. 1 yr, exper, pref.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Bodine Electric Co., Chicago-Various
engrg. positions including: 1. Sr.. Ap-
plication Engr., ME or EE pref. 6-12
yrs. exper. 2. Jr. Application Engr. ME
or EE, 2 yrs. exper. 3. Mech. Engr. ME,
5-10 yrs. exper. 4. Elect. Engr. EE, 2-3
yrs. A.C. engrg. exper.
Michigan Dept. of Health, Lansing -
Engrg. positions open in Div. of Occu-
pational Health-air pol'lution control
& indust. hygiene engrg. Also Chem-
ist, exper. in indust. hygiene & air
,,pollution chem.
E. F. Houghton & Co., Detroit-Tech.
Sales Trainee. Degree in Chem. or
Mech. Engrg. Indist. sales 'exper. help-
ful.
Oakland Community College, Union
Lake, Mich.-Accountant. Immed. open-
ing. BBA minimum. Exper. req.
State of Michigan-l. Public Health
Nurse Consultant, degree in public
health nursing or nursing degree plus
9 mos. trng. in public health nursing.
2 yrs. exper. 2. Suggestion Award
Coordinator. BA plus 4 yrs. exper. in
personnel, trng., budget apalysis or rel.
Application deadline Aug. 23.
Local Engrg. Firm-Engrg. Assistants.
Immed. openings for men & women. 1
yr. position. Engrg. bkgd. helpful. No
exper. req.
Laidlaw Brothers, Div. of Doubleday
& Co., River Forest, II1.-Sales Repres.
Immed. opening for grad to sell text-
books to schools. 4-5 yrs. teaching and/
or school admin. exper. N.E. Mich. ter-
ritory, headquarters in Flint.
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Boyne Mountain Lodge, Boyne Falls,
Mich.-Needed. Waitresses & bus boys
after Aug. 18. Part or full time. Details
at 212 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have vacan-
cies for the 1965-66 school year:
Clio, Mich. - Algebra/Geometry/J.H.
basketball/football.

East Detroit, Mich.-Voc. Ind. Arts -
welding/sheet metal; J.H.-Math (also
H.S.), Engl.; H.S. English.
Lombard, Ill. -- H.S. Guidance and
Counselor (MA or near).
Midland, Mich. - Speech Correction,
H.S. English.
Milan, Mich.-11/12 Shop Class.
Stockbridge, Mich.-Elem. Type B
Spec. Ed., J.H.-Soc. Stud., Math; Jr.
& Sr. High Type A Mentally Retarded.
* * *
For additional. information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, Educ.
Div., 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
Use of This Columi for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB.
* * *
The Tutorial & Cultural Relations
Project will have a meeting, Thurs.,
Aug. 5 at .7,:30 p.m. in Room 3B of
the Michigan Union to discuss prob-
lems'and progress of sumner tutor.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw: Book review; 9 p.m.:
"Hymn of the Universe" by Teilhard
de Chardinn Wed. evening devotion, 10
p.m.

II

I-M Scores
SEMI-FINALS
Math 7, Psych "A" 2
Economics 14; Prescott 10
TODAY'S GAMES
N. C. Grads vs. Bio Chem
TV Center vs. Dental School

1

DIAL 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT

, ,.

LAUREN

III

,
r
e
EE
y0C
G

ANY
TIM
You can do your banking by mail
-day time, night time

niirmce On. CARPENTER ROAD
LOCATED 2 MILES SOUTH OF
WASHTENAW ROAD
NOW SHOWING
THE SCREEN BLAZES WITH THE
STORY BASED ON THE
BLISTERING BEST-SELLER!
HIARLOW Color
-PLUS--

I

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Full Time & Evening Employment
MEN 18-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week and
occasionally on Saturday, you can maintain your studies and still enjoy
a part-time job doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $67.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or 7 to 9 p.m. Monday-Friday. No other
timesr
We are also interested in full-time employment.

CIVITAN
JAZZ BAND

t

Amk

{1
a

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan